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      How to Create a Company Page on LinkedIn to Promote Your Small Business


      With the rise of social media marketing and the prevalence of social networks in our day-to-day lives, having a presence on a variety of platforms is a must for your company. That means creating and managing multiple accounts, which can be time-consuming.

      Fortunately, building and maintaining a company page on LinkedIn only takes a little extra time and effort. By adding an air of professionalism to your online presence and showing off your products or services, a well-rounded LinkedIn page can help polish and promote your company’s identity.

      This article will explain the many benefits of creating a company page on LinkedIn. Then we’ll show you how to launch one, pointing out the important requirements you’ll need to meet along the way. Let’s dive on in!

      Build a Website to Go with Your LinkedIn Company Page

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      The Benefits of Having an Outstanding LinkedIn Company Page

      As a social media platform designed to help people build their professional networks, LinkedIn is a crucial resource for any business that’s hoping to grow and expand. It can help you get plugged into industry-related news and even share valuable content that promotes your company.

      When compared with individual employee profiles, a LinkedIn company page can be much more effective at showcasing your business as a whole. Of course, your employees’ profiles are still useful as well. They can act as indirect company ambassadors and help build your connections organically.

      On the other hand, a company page is a useful outlet for showing off your business’ latest news, along with your specialized products or services. LinkedIn will help deliver this content to other professionals in your industry to generate buzz and business.

      Another handy feature of the platform is that you can easily monitor the impact of your page. Notifications and visual analytics reports will keep you apprised of how often your company is mentioned on LinkedIn so that you can see the effects of your presence there.

      Plus, this will help you create effective promotional content for your page. You can keep track of trending content to see what’s working, and use custom Call to Action (CTA) buttons to send traffic towards your website. In other words, a LinkedIn company page offers a lot of potential advantages.

      How to Create an Award-Winning Company Page on LinkedIn (In 6 Steps)

      There are quite a few things to consider if you want to create a company page and successfully promote your business on LinkedIn. However, with a little careful planning, it can be worth the investment of time and energy. The steps below will help you effectively plan and build your page.

      Step 1: Ensure That You Meet LinkedIn’s Requirements for Creating a Company Page

      One potential roadblock when it comes to creating your LinkedIn company page is that there are a handful of requirements you must meet to access this feature. For instance, you’ll need to have a personal LinkedIn profile of your own. That account also has to:

      • Be at least seven days old
      • Have a profile strength of Intermediate or All Star
      • Show that you’re currently an employee at the company you wish to create a page for
      • List your company position on your profile
      • Have several first-degree connections (there’s no specific number you must reach, but the more you can include, the better)
      • Be associated with a company email address that has a unique company domain

      In short, if you’re not an active LinkedIn user already, it can be challenging to get a company page started. Fortunately, anyone who’s an employee at your business can create and manage your company page. As long as you have at least one active LinkedIn user, meeting these requirements shouldn’t be too hard.

      The one criteria that might get a little tricky is providing a company email address with a unique domain. Gmail, Yahoo, and other accounts won’t work for this purpose. You’ll need an address like johnsmith@mycompany.com.

      Fortunately, we offer an affordable solution.

      At DreamHost, we provide professional email plans for creating addresses with unique domains. They start at just $1.67 per month per mailbox. You don’t even have to register your domain or host your website with us — this service is available to anyone!

      Get Professional Email @yourdomain

      Promote your website with every message you send when you set up professional email that matches your domain with DreamHost. Plans start at $1.67/mo.

      Step 2: Add Your Company’s Details to Launch Your New Page

      Once your profile (or an employee’s profile) meets all of LinkedIn’s requirements for creating a company page, you can do so by clicking on the Work icon in the toolbar. Then scroll down and select Create a Company Page.

      Creating a new Company Page on LinkedIn.

      On the next screen, choose the tile that best describes your business. After that, you’ll be able to fill in some basic details about your company. Start with your company’s name and then create your custom LinkedIn company page URL. Don’t forget to add your website’s address as well.

      Adding company details to a new LinkedIn company page.

      Next, you can select your company’s industry, size, and type. You have to choose from several drop-down menu options, so you may need to pick the available choice that’s most relevant, especially when it comes to your industry.

      After that, scroll down to upload your company’s logo and add your tagline. These elements are essential for promoting brand recognition through your profile.

      Adding a logo and tagline to a new LinkedIn company page.

      Keep an eye on the Page Preview section to get a peek at how your company page will look. When all your information is correct, check the box to agree to LinkedIn’s terms and then hit the Create page button.

      Step 3: Spruce Up Your Company’s Profile to Attract and Inform Visitors

      After you’ve officially created your company page, you can start adding additional information and brand elements. First and foremost, you’ll probably want to include a banner image. This is a large image that will be displayed at the top of your page, similar to a cover photo on Facebook.

      DreamHost’s LinkedIn company page banner image.

      You can use the small blue pencil icons to edit various features on your company page, including your banner image. You might use a team photo, a picture of your brick-and-mortar location, a popular product image, or a relevant decorative visual.

      Additionally, you’ll want to write a compelling summary of your company for the Overview in your About section. LinkedIn provides limited space here — just 2,000 characters, including spaces — so you’ll want to make every word count. Be sure to highlight what makes your company unique and better than the competition.

      Then head over to the Jobs section of your page. Here you can provide career-related information and job postings.

      Job postings on DreamHost’s LinkedIn company page.

      Since many LinkedIn users take advantage of the platform’s job hunting features, this can help to boost your page’s visibility. Just make sure to keep it updated so you don’t have people applying for positions that are no longer available.

      Step 4: Post Regular Updates to Generate Industry-Related Content

      Now that your page is up and includes all your company’s information and some key branding elements, it’s time to start filling it with content. There are a few ways to go about this. One of the easiest is to use LinkedIn to promote blog content you’ve already created for your business website.

      A blog post on the DreamHost LinkedIn company page.

      This doesn’t require you to generate any new long-form content, and it can drive visitors to your website via your blog. Simply include LinkedIn as a part of your blog promotion strategy, and you’ll have a regular source of content for your company page.

      However, you can also include recent business news, upcoming events, and other company-specific posts to keep your followers in the loop.

      An update on DreamHost’s LinkedIn company page.

      This can be a smart and simple way to demonstrate your authority in your industry, promote events, and even attract more followers. Just remember that, as with a blog, your LinkedIn company page will thrive when filled with relevant content that your followers want to see and read.

      Step 5: Promote Your LinkedIn Company Page to Gain Followers

      Your company page isn’t very useful if no one knows it exists. Especially when you’re first getting it off the ground, promotion will be vital to gathering followers. One of the easiest ways to get started is by adding your company’s location to your page’s About section.

      The Locations section of the DreamHost LinkedIn company page.

      This makes your company and job postings more discoverable on LinkedIn. Your page will be more likely to show up in searches as a result. Using relevant keywords in your page’s content can also help to increase your reach.

      Another key promotional tactic is engaging your employees on LinkedIn. Invite them to list your company page on their own profiles and claim it as their place of employment. This will help you tap into their already existing networks to make connections with others in your industry.

      Finally, it never hurts to promote your LinkedIn page on other social channels. This may mean including links to your company page in your Twitter bio or your Facebook About section. You could also include LinkedIn among your social sharing icons on your website and blog posts.

      Step 6: Showcase Individual Products or Services on Their Own Pages

      So far, we’ve covered all the basics for creating and maintaining a LinkedIn company page. However, you can take your profile to the next level and use it as a way to promote specific products or services, by creating showcase pages as well.

      These are pages dedicated to your company’s products or services. They appear on your company page in the right-hand sidebar, under Affiliated pages.

      The showcase pages on Automattic’s LinkedIn company page.

      You can write a description, share a link, and even post content on each of your showcase pages. If you offer a wide range of products or services, this is a way to provide targeted content for each of your audiences. In some cases, this technique may be more effective than offering generalized content on your company page itself.

      If you’d like to create more traditional, campaign-based content for LinkedIn, you might also consider using the platform’s advertising options. LinkedIn ads are highly targeted and can help you reach other professionals in your industry, generate leads, attract job applicants, and more.

      Linking Up

      You have a lot of options when it comes to promoting your business on social media. With its professional audience and unique opportunities for showing off your products and services, LinkedIn can prove well worth your time.

      This guide has demonstrated how to create a high-quality LinkedIn company page in just six steps:

      1. Ensure that you meet LinkedIn’s requirements for creating a company page.
      2. Add your company’s details to launch your new page.
      3. Spruce up your company’s profile to attract and inform visitors.
      4. Post regular updates to generate industry-related content.
      5. Promote your LinkedIn company page to gain followers.
      6. Showcase individual products or services on their own pages.

      Do you need a business website to go with your LinkedIn company page? At DreamHost, we offer affordable hosting services with robust features and resources to help you create the perfect website for your company. Check out our Shared Hosting plans today!



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      Building Your Own Business Website? Don’t Make These 10 Mistakes


      It can be daunting to get a business website up and running.

      Let’s be real here: if you weren’t a little bit jittery about it, we’d be worried. Not because you can’t do this. You totally can. It’s easy to build a great-looking business website if you use the right tools — and you don’t even have to know how to code!

      No, it’s daunting because your website matters so much to the health of your business. It’ll help you generate leads, drive conversions, and build your brand. But like a first date, there are a lot of ways to screw this thing up.

      “So, you’re paying, right?”

      “I’m a huge Nickleback fan.”

      “Do you mind if my mom joins us?”

      Luckily, avoiding “website don’ts” is much easier than finding love in a hopeless place. In this post, I’ll outline the 10 biggest mistakes you could make when setting up a website for your small business. Avoid these pitfalls and you’ll be on your way to turning visitors into devoted customers. Ah, l’amour.

      1. Failing To Make A Responsive Website

      This is the ultimate beginner’s mistake. So what is a responsive website anyway?

      Simply put, it’s a website that responds to its environment to give the user the best possible viewing experience. In other words, if a user comes searching for your website on a mobile phone, then the site’s layout will display in a different, more accessible way than if they were visiting the site on a desktop.

      We’ve gone in-depth on why mobile-friendly website design matters here on the blog before. But here are the simple facts: 61 percent of users who have trouble accessing a mobile site are unlikely to return. Of those, 40 percent will seek out a competitor’s site instead. And if you don’t create a mobile-friendly website, Google’s going to ding you too.

      The takeaway?

      When choosing a website builder or platform to create your website, make sure you pick one that offers responsive designs. You don’t want to mess around with a stagnant design that will drive away mobile visitors.

      2. Not Customizing Your Theme

      One of the best things about using a content management system is the free themes available at your fingertips. In fact, as soon as you settle on your web hosting company and purchase a domain, you can select the perfect theme to match your brand in mere minutes.

      However, it’s important to remember whatever platform you use, you’re going to have to customize it to match your brand’s style. Otherwise, you’ll be left with a website that looks exactly like thousands of other business sites on the web — a big mistake.

      Happily, with Remixer, our in-house website builder, it’s easy to personalize your site. You can upload and insert your own images (or use our royalty-free gallery, your call), flesh out your unique content, and place menu items where you need them to build your dream website.

      3. Using Jargon

      We get it. You have been working in your field for years and years, and you’re literally a master of your industry. You know what “IPC,” “VC Money,” and “apportunity” stand for, but I’ve got news for you — your website visitors don’t.

      If a visitor lands on your website and the copywriting is full of technical jargon they can’t understand, they’re not going to stick around to parse through your metaphors.

      Remember: the average human has a shorter attention span than a goldfish. That’s a piddly eight seconds. This means when customers find your site, they need to encounter copy that is straightforward and encourages them to take action fast — whether that’s watching a video, entering your sign-up flow, or subscribing to an email newsletter.

      If you need a good example, Dropbox Business slays when it comes to website design and simple copywriting. Let’s take a look at their homepage.

      dropbox business home page

      What is Dropbox Business doing right?

      • The headline is straightforward with no jargon.
      • The subheading tells you what they do in one easy-to-follow sentence. In fact, it’s immediately clear what the company offers.
      • The call-to-action is easy to see (and click)!

      When approaching copywriting and design, be like Dropbox.

      4. Not Thinking About Readability

      Not only does your copywriting need to be sweet and simple, but the design also has to be easy on the eyes.

      And I don’t just mean nice to look at; it also has to be easy to read.

      When you use a website builder, you have free reign to customize your website as you wish, but this doesn’t mean you should part with best practices. To make sure your users don’t get turned off by your design, stick to these rules:

      • Keep Your Font Sizes Consistent — Larger font sizes are a good way to say, “This is important, so pay attention.” Smaller font sizes should be used for more in-depth information. When building your website, don’t go hog wild and use a bunch of different sizes. Stick to three or four sizes.
      • Consider Your Fonts — Papyrus may look cute on your kid’s 5th birthday party invite, but it doesn’t look great on your website. Luckily, most website builders themes will only use fonts that designers have already vetted for readability and looks. One important tip: Sans-serif fonts — the ones without the extra little flourishes — are generally easier to read on the web.
      • Choose Contrasting Colors — When selecting a color palette for your website, make sure the background images don’t drown out your font. Readability has to be the first priority. If you’re design challenged (no shame in admitting that, by the way), Remixer comes with preset color mixes so you don’t have to worry about the subtle differences between Seafoam and Aqua.

      freshbooks cloud accounting home page

      So who is doing readability right? FreshBooks is nailing it.

      • The copy is free of jargon, simple, and straight to the point.
      • Even though their content is more robust than the Dropbox example above, it’s still easy to understand.
      • The colors work nicely with each other, and none of the images detract from the text.
      • The most important messages are in larger font while the supplemental information is in a smaller font.

      Overall, the readability of this website is on the money — which is good because, well, their business is all about the dollars.

      5. Falling For Search Engine Optimization Myths

      Every new business owner hopes to create a website that will sit on the top of the search results on Google, Bing, Yahoo, and every other search engine. And they hope to rank for more than just one keyword.

      However, the truth of the matter is that a good SEO strategy takes time, smarts, and money. Plus, it’s impossible to successfully optimize your homepage for hundreds of keywords. That’s just not how the internet works, and if you try to cut corners, Google knows where you live.

      Seriously, it knows.

      A better strategy is to think about the top keyword for your website and optimize your content to rank for that keyword. Here are a few suggestions:

      • Write Long-Form Content — Once upon a time, stuffing your content with your top keyword would help you rank in the search results. Gone are those days, and just like on that first date we talked about earlier, you’ll actually be penalized for trying too hard. These days, it’s better to simply write your content for the user. Be as comprehensive and helpful as possible and Google will reward you.
      • Structure Your Content with Heading Tags — Heading tags — the top-down <h1> to <h6>s — are often seen as a “meh, not that important” sort of thing, but they really do matter. Headings give structure to your pages, making it easier for both readers and Google bots to consume your content. To get the most SEO bang for your buck with headings, follow this guide from Yoast.
      • Add a Call-to-Action — Your homepage should have a clear call-to-action (CTA). Not only will it help direct your readers to do the thing you want them to do — buy your product, sign up for your service, or subscribe to your newsletter — but it will help Google focus on what is important to you.

      The Moz blog is a solid example of on-point optimization. Here’s what they’re doing right:

      • Clear, strong heading tags in every post.
      • Structured content that is easy to follow, read, and scan.
      • The posts aren’t laden with annoying keywords. Instead, it supports the H1 tag and is helpful to readers.

      6. Going Pop-Up Crazy

      Here’s how I like to think about pop-ups. When someone puts a sign in front of your face, it’s difficult not to pay attention to it. But when someone puts a whole bunch of signs in your face, it’s impossible to pay attention to any of them.

      Helpful pop-ups that serve your readers are a great way to build your business. For example, you can include ONE pop-up asking someone to do ONE of the following: join your mailing list, share a post, follow you on social media, or sign up for an upcoming event.

      But the second you start throwing pop-ups on your website to join your mailing list and share a post and follow you on social media and sign up for your webinar, and . . . you are not serving your visitors — or your business.

      When it comes to pop-ups, be wise. Determine what the most pressing action you want your users to take is and then build a pop-up around that action. Leave the rest out. Simple as that.

      example of pop-up 'super early bird 65% off'

      Digital Marketer, one of the marketing world’s top thought leaders, serves as a great example of using pop-ups wisely.

      • Digital Marketer is an online publication with thousands of daily followers. They use this pop-up to let subscribers know about an upcoming event.
      • Once a subscriber either enters their information or opts out, the pop-up disappears.
      • The pop-up isn’t asking for multiple actions from the subscriber.

      Feel free to use a pop-up on your website. Just don’t go crazy or your website visitors will feel like they’ve shown up at a protest with mixed messages.

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      Join our monthly newsletter for tips and tricks to build your dream website!

      7. Slow Server Times

      Did you know customers will only wait 4 seconds for a site to load before clicking out of the website, according to a study by Akamai Technologies? That means if you want to keep your customers interested, you need to make sure your site loads whip fast.

      The good news is when you build your site with Remixer, you are working with a product that is configured to make load times faster. Remixer’s static pages load whip-fast compared to dynamic ones.

      8. Poor Navigation

      The internet yields nearly 7 billion global searches a day, and websites with intuitive navigation are rewarded with more visitors (and visitors who stick around for longer). If you can’t help your users get what they want immediately, chances are they will move on to a competitor’s site.

      Even if you’re not a professional, there are a few simple things you can do to make sure your design is intuitive for visitors:

      • Use a Theme — The easiest way to create a winning website is to use a website builder. With Remixer, the important structural elements you’ll need for a basic website are incorporated into each of our expert-built themes. That means, all you have to do is choose a design that works with your brand, add your content, and boom, you’ve got a well-designed website — no coding required.
      • Stick to the Standard — Humans are creatures of habit. And most of us are trained to expect vertical navigation on the left side of the page and horizontal navigation across the top of the page. To avoid confusion, keep your navigation standard.
      • Don’t Overwhelm Users — You may be tempted to include several links in your navigation bar. But remember: less is more. Stick to the basics — About, Products, Services, Contact, etc. — in your navigation menu.

      You know what’s coming next, don’t you? A good example! 4 Rivers Smokehouse has a really sleek design.

      • The navigation bar is up top, simple, and easy to read.
      • You know exactly how to take action as soon as you view the home page. “Show me the menu!”
      • The design is simple — and makes you want to dive into a plate of slow-roasted brisket.

      9. Outdated Information and/or Design

      I know we just talked about brisket, but building a website is not like making slow-cooked pork. You can’t set it and forget it! Your website requires regular updates and maintenance for a variety of reasons.

      • Updated Information Helps Customers — If you let your website information get outdated, it will be difficult for customers to find you, order from you, and remain a loyal customer. Don’t leave them hanging!
      • It Keeps Google Happy — Google ranks websites based on a huge algorithm. One major driver of rankings: how fresh and robust is your site’s content? This means you need to frequently add new content to your site (blog posts, anyone?) and routinely spruce up your older pages and posts.
      • Updated Design Keeps Your Brand Relevant — The tech world is constantly innovating, and you need to stay in the game when it comes to design trends and best practices. For example, here’s how Google and Facebook, two of the world’s most popular websites, looked when they first launched. Imagine how successful they would have been if they never updated their look and feel. Yeah, it’s not a pretty picture.
      Google home page in 1996
      Google in 1996
      Facebook in 2004
      Facebook in 2004

      As you continue to build (and grow!) your business, make sure your website keeps up.

      10. Don’t Go It Alone

      Building a website from scratch is a lofty goal, but unless you’re really looking forward to investing in the process, it can be a big drain on your resources. And remember, your time counts as a resource when you’re bootstrapping a small business. If you need a responsive, professional-looking website — and you need it fast — Remixer is the tool for you.

      Need a Beautiful Website?

      Design it yourself with Remixer, our easy-to-use website builder. No coding required.

      You can start with a free responsive theme that’s been put together by our web experts to help you sidestep all the mistakes we’ve outlined above. Our themes are designed to load quickly, look great, and help you easily plug in SEO-friendly content.

      All you have to do is import your content, customize your theme, and then hit ‘publish.’ And if you get stuck somewhere along the way, the DreamHost team is just a chat away. Today is the day to start building your own Remixer site for free.



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      Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Basics: Testing 101


      “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.” – Seneca

      As I covered in another blog post, the first step to any effective business continuity and disaster recovery program is crafting a thoughtful, achievable plan.

      But having a great business continuity and disaster recovery plan on paper doesn’t mean that the work is done. After all, how do you evaluate the efficacy of your plan or make adjustments before you actually need it? The answer: by putting it to the test.

      Disaster Recovery Plan Testing

      I am fond of saying that managed services are a three-legged stool made up of technology, people and processes. If you lose any one leg, the stool falls over. And since an IT department is essentially offering managed services to the wider organization, IT management should think in terms of the same triad.

      Let’s break it down:

      • Technology: the tool or set of tools to be used
      • People: trained, knowledgeable staff to operate the technology
      • Processes: the written instructions for the people to follow when operating the technology. (See another blog I wrote for more information: “6 Processes You Need to Mature Your Managed Services.”)

      For a disaster recovery scenario, you need to test the stool to make sure that each leg is ready and that the people know what to do when the time comes. One useful tool for this is a tabletop exercise (TTX). The purpose of the TTX is to simply get people thinking about what technology they touch and what processes are already in place to support their tasks.

      Tabletop Exercise Steps

      Let’s walk through the stages of a typical TTX.

      No. 1: Develop a Narrative

      Write a quick narrative for the disaster. Start off assuming all your staff are available, and then work through threats that you may have already identified. Some examples:

      • Over the weekend, a train derailed, spilling hazardous materials. The fire department has evacuated an area that includes your headquarters, which contains important servers.
      • Just 10 minutes ago, your firm’s servers were all struck by a ransomware attack.
      • Heavy rains have occurred, and the server room in the basement is starting to flood.

      Now, some questions and prompts for your staff:

      • What should we do?
      • How do we communicate during this?
      • How do we continue to support the business?
      • What are you doing? Show me! (Pointing isn’t usually polite, but this might be a time to do so.)
      • How do we communicate the event to clients, customers, users, etc.?

      Going through the exercise, you’ll likely find that certain recovery processes are not properly documented or even completely missing. For example, your network administrator might not have a written recovery process. Have them and any other relevant staff produce and formalize the process, ready to be shared at the next TTX.

      Continue this way for all the role-players until your team can successfully work through the scenario.  You will want to thoroughly test people’s roles, whether in networking, operating systems, applications, end user access or any other area.

      No. 2: Insert Some Realism

      Unfortunately, we have all seen emergency situations and scenarios, such as the 9/11 terrorist attacks, where key personnel are either missing, incapacitated or even deceased. In less unhappy scenarios, some staff might not be able to tend to work since their home or family was affected by the disaster. For the purposes of a TTX, you can simply designate someone as being on vacation and unreachable, then have them sit out.

      Ask:

      • Who picks up their duties?
      • Does the replacement know where to find the documentation?
      • Can the replacement read and understand the written documentation?

      No. 3: “DIVE, DIVE, DIVE!”—Always Be Prepared

      Just like a submarine commander might call a crash dive drill at the most inopportune time, call a TTX drill on your own team to test the plan. For this, someone might actually be on vacation. Use that to your advantage to make sure that the whole team knows how to step in and how to communicate throughout the drill. You might even plan the drill to coincide with a key player’s vacation for added realism.

      No. 4: Break Away From the Table

      Once you’ve executed your tabletop exercise, now it’s time to do a real test! Have your team actually work through all of the steps of the process to fail over to the recovery site.

      Again, you will want to test that the servers and application can all be turned up at the recovery environment. To prevent data islands, make certain that users can successfully access your applications’ recovery site from where they would operate during a disaster. Here are some questions for user access testing:

      • Can users reach the replica site over the internet/VPN?
      • Can users use remote desktop protocol (RDP) to connect to servers in the replica environment?
      • If users in an office were displaced, could they reach the replica site from home using an SSL VPN?

      No. 5: Bring in a Trusted Service Partner

      The help that an IT service provider provides you doesn’t have to stop with managing your Disaster Recovery as a Service infrastructure or environment. With every INAP DRaaS solution, you get white glove onboarding and periodic testing to make sure that your plans are as robust as you need them to be. Between scheduled tests, you can also test your failover at will, taking your staff beyond tabletop exercises to evaluate their ability to recover the environment on their own. Staying prepared to handle disaster is a continuous process, and we can be there every step of the way to guide you through it.

      Explore INAP Disaster Recovery as a Service.

      LEARN MORE

      Paul Painter
      • Director, Solution Architecture


      Paul Painter is Director, Solution Architecture. He manages the central U.S. region, with his team supporting sales by providing quality presales engineering and optimizing customer onboarding processes. READ MORE



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