One place for hosting & domains

      Choosing

      A Simple Guide for Choosing the Right Hybrid IT Infrastructure Mix for Your Applications


      According to INAP’s latest State of IT Infrastructure Management report, 69 percent of IT professionals say their organization has already adopted a hybrid IT strategy, deploying their infrastructure on more than one platform.

      What’s responsible for the growing popularity of hybrid IT? Simply put, a hybrid IT model allows companies to embrace the flexibility of the cloud while maintaining control over resources that might not be best suited for a cloud environment.

      In this simple guide, I will:

      • Briefly define hybrid IT (and what it’s not)
      • Summarize the three most important factors that will shape your hybrid IT mix
      • Illustrate how popular infrastructure models—like public cloud and bare metal—can be viewed through the lens of these factors

      What is Hybrid IT?

      Hybrid IT is an infrastructure model that embraces a combination of on-prem, colocation and cloud-based environments to make up an enterprises’ infrastructure mix. It’s important to note that while hybrid IT can encompass both hybrid cloud (which uses private and public cloud services for a single application) and multicloud (using multiple cloud services for different applications), it is not interchangeable with these terms.

      Three Considerations for Shaping Your Hybrid IT Infrastructure Mix

      If you’ve thought about making the jump to a hybrid IT model, what factors should you consider for selecting the right infrastructure mix? At the application level, it’s easy to get in the weeds of whether a certain platform or provider will perform better over another. That’s an important process, but it’s not where you want to start your planning.

      When I meet with a new customer or prospect to flesh out a hybrid IT strategy, three fundamental topics chart the course of the solution design process: Economics, management rigor and solution flexibility. Let’s break down each into simple questions.

      1. Is CAPEX or OPEX spending more optimal for your workloads?

      One of cloud computing’s more attractive features is the ability to substitute capital expenditures (CAPEX) for ongoing usage-based operational expenditures (OPEX). It’s likely that OPEX cloud environments will end up covering a sizable chunk of IT workloads in the future, but it will by no means be suitable for all use cases. Adopting a hybrid IT strategy acknowledges that CAPEX intensive models, like on-prem and colocation, will have their place long into the cloud computing era.

      To decide whether OPEX or CAPEX is the way to go, analyze the short- and long-term needs of the application.

      OPEX addresses the needs of ephemeral workloads that use compute and storage resources sporadically. OPEX models are also advantageous for new applications or services where steady state usage levels are yet to be determined.

      When provisioning constant workloads for the long term, however, it’s generally more cost-effective to use CAPEX over OPEX, as the investment would be amortized over the time period it is used or planned for (typically 3 or 5 years).

      2. How much time do you want to put into managing your infrastructure solutions?

      To determine whether managed or unmanaged solutions are a better fit for your company, think about how much time the IT department has to spend handling the day-to-day upkeep of the infrastructure. Consider this: Of the 500 IT pros we interviewed for the aforementioned State of IT Infrastructure Management report, 59 percent of participants said they are frustrated by the time spent on routine infrastructure activities and 84 percent agreed that they “could bring more value to their organization if they spent less time on routine tasks”.

      Depending on how much an enterprise expects its IT team to move the needle forward for the business, managed solutions might be the best fit. In addition, some businesses may have special requirements to address, such as security or compliance, which require outside help from service providers who have expertise in handling and addressing those needs.

      3. How important is solution flexibility?

      Workload characteristics may change over time. Services and applications might need to be adjusted or completely discontinued due to changes in business priorities or merger and acquisition events. Changes in IT leadership and decision makers may shift the focus and priorities, or if a newly launched service is unexpectedly more popular in some geographical areas, it may in turn require shifting resources and focus for the IT team.

      When such unforeseen events happen, unplanned changes to the IT environment will follow suit. As such, it’s important to have a trusted service provider who can help you successfully navigate these changes.

      Spend portability allows you to shift spending or investments from existing contracted services to other service offerings while staying at the same level of spend. For instance, expenses on contracted colocation services may need to shift to bare metal or private cloud solutions based on changing workload needs. To help customers adapt their infrastructure to new requirements and unexpected adjustments, we at INAP launched the industry’s first formal spend portability program, INAP Interchange, for new colocation or cloud customers.

      No matter what provider you choose to partner with, ensure you have flexibility for those unforeseen future changes to your business.

      Choosing a Best-Fit Infrastructure Mix to Manage Change and Application Lifecycles

      Now that you’ve thought about the best budgetary, management models and flexibility you’ll need for your applications and workloads, let’s consider the most common infrastructure deployment models and how they speak to each consideration.

      The following graph plots each type of environment along an X-Y axis. The environments further to the right adhere more closely to an OPEX model, and those plotted higher mean less of the infrastructure management burden falls to the customer.

      It’s likely your hybrid IT mix will end up utilizing several of these options, depending on your application stack. For hybrid cloud use cases, many of these environments may be interconnected, as well.

      CAPEX vs. OPEX

      • On-Premise still is the locale for a substantial amount of IT workloads and applications. With a few exceptions these are almost always fully managed in-house and fall on the CAPEX side of the spectrum.
      • Colocation typically offers space, power and physical security within a reliable data center facility. It may be augmented with remote hands (RH) offerings but can also be extended to a fully managed colo environment by the data center provider or other third-party vendors.
      • Private cloud usually consists of managed physical and virtual hosts, managed network, storage and security in a dedicated environment. The offering can be extended with more premium managed services such as database administration, threat management and IDS/IPS, app monitoring, compliance enablement or even to a fully managed solution by the service provider.
      • Public cloud tends to be an unmanaged offering, though it can be enhanced with additional managed services such monitoring, security, backup and disaster recovery services. For organizations interested in using the public could such as AWS, Azure and GCP, but have no expertise in deploying or managing workloads in such environments, a managed public cloud service may be helpful. It can cover any level of engagement from the initial design and deployment to a comprehensive daily management of the cloud environment.
      • Similar to public cloud on the IaaS level, bare metal also tends to be unmanaged, but can easily be augmented by premium managed services and monitoring. Compared to multitenant cloud, bare metal typically provides greater performance while being more cost effective, making it a destination for those moving away from public cloud for cost or performance reasons.

      Closing Thoughts

      Are you ready to embrace a hybrid IT strategy? Or do you want to review your current strategy? As you reflect on the considerations and solutions outlined in this blog, know that you can reach out to our experts at INAP. We’re here to discuss the best fit solutions for your company. here to check out our locations or chat now to get in touch.

      Interested in learning more?

      CHAT NOW

      Layachi Khodja


      READ MORE



      Source link

      Choosing a Linux Distribution


      Updated by Linode

      Written by Ryan Syracuse

      What is a Distribution?

      Distributions or “distros” can be described as different operating system versions built on top of the underlying Linux Kernel to support a variety of use-cases and preferences. Since all distributions are built on Linux, most are similar and can be used interchangeably. Ubuntu, for example, is the most popular for it’s ease of use and the ability to abstract smaller configuration tasks for you by default. Arch Linux on the other hand does not provide this simplicity in favor of more control, so that you can fine tune the way that your system
      functions.

      Below is a full list of distributions that we provide, and a brief description of each:

      Distribution Description
      Alpine Lightweight distribution popular with Docker and security minded users.
      Arch Powerful and detail oriented, empowers more advanced users to fine tune their configuration.
      CentOS Widely popular in professional and business settings while still being accessible to the average user.
      CoreOS Container-focused distribution, designed for clustered deployments
      Debian One of the oldest distributions in use, popular, steady, and reliable. Regularly updated and maintained.
      Fedora Implements bleeding edge software. Fedora is similar though more advanced than CentOS and great for users who want to use the newest of the new and don’t mind an added layer of complexity.
      Gentoo Advanced distribution designed for power users who want more control over their configuration and are comfortable compiling everything from source.
      Slackware The oldest actively maintained distribution. One of the most UNIX-like Linux distributions available.
      Ubuntu Arguably the most popular Linux distribution, widely regarded for it’s ease of use.
      OpenSUSE Provides powerful tools specific to system administration tasks.

      Note

      Though this list covers most popular distributions, creating a Linode using a distribution that we do not provide is possible. Feel free to follow our Custom Distribution Guide for more information.

      Find answers, ask questions, and help others.

      This guide is published under a CC BY-ND 4.0 license.



      Source link

      CentOS vs Ubuntu: Choosing the Right Linux Distribution for Your Server


      CentOS, Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, RHEL, OpenSUSE, FreeBSD, Manjaro—the list of Linux distributions goes on and on. In fact, there are literally hundreds of distributions (a.k.a. distros) a Linux fanatic can choose from, and while not all stay active forever, 791 have existed since 2001, according to the DistroWatch database.1

      Despite the multitude of options, there are two distributions we see customers requesting most often for their dedicated servers: CentOS and Ubuntu. This post delves into the similarities, differences, and general IT user sentiment for these popular distros.

      Let’s start with a quick look at how these two stack up in terms of known website usage, as reported by w3techs.com:2

      As you can see, it’s a close race. Ubuntu is used by slightly more sites, as well as by more high traffic sites, with CentOS close behind. We’ll unpack some of the reasons why that might be, but first, here’s an overview of each respective distribution.

      Ubuntu Overview

      Based on the Debian architecture, Ubuntu was used early on for personal computers but has since become a household name in server-class computing and cloud environments. Ubuntu runs on the most popular architectures, including Intel, AMD, and ARM-based machines.

      Oh, and a fun fact: it’s named after the South African philosophy of ubuntu, which translates to “human-ness,” “humanity to others,” or “I am what I am because of who we all are.”3

      Ubuntu is known for its frequent update release cycles, which occurs publicly every six months with free support for a particular release for nine months following. Additionally, starting with Ubuntu 6.06, there’s a major release every two years that receives long-term support (LTS) for five years. These releases support hardware and integration for all updates in that series (i.e., 6.0X).

      Relative to other popular Linux distributions, Ubuntu is incredibly feature rich and friendly to developers looking to stay on the cutting edge. That said, it takes more support to stay up to date with the release cycle than some of the other distros, CentOS included. This can sometimes be seen as a con to going all-in on Ubuntu. More features and more releases can mean more complexity.

      Ubuntu utilizes the Advanced Package Tool (APT) using DEB packages for software management.

      Suggested Ubuntu-based alternatives: Linux Mint (desktop), elementary OS (desktop), Zorin OS (desktop), Pinguy OS (desktop), Trisquel GNU/Linux (free software), Bodhi Linux (desktop with Enlightenment) 

      CentOS Overview

      A free variant of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), CentOS is known for its stability and support from their far-reaching community of enthusiasts. This Linux distribution falls in line with enterprise class needs and provides IT users a reliable way to deliver their applications and services. With a less-frequent release cycle than Ubuntu and others, CentOS typically requires less support and development expertise. Major release cycles happen every 2-3 years, which follows the RHEL release cycle.

      CentOS also comes with 7-10 years of free security updates. There’s an attractiveness to the fact that every version can serve for up to 10 years in that you don’t have to worry about major changes that could impact your applications, security, and user experience.

      Relative to Ubuntu, CentOS comes with fewer features, but this also makes it lightweight and consumes less of your compute resources. So if your applications are heavy, this operating system is one less resource-hungry area to worry about and factor into your growth model.

      CentOS utilizes the YUM graphical and command line utility using RPM packages for software management.

      Other RHEL clones and CentOS-based distributions: Scientific Linux, Springdale Linux, SME Server, Rocks Cluster Distribution, Oracle Enterprise Linux (according to distrowatch.com)

      Pros and Cons of Ubuntu and CentOS

      In some cases, a choice to go with Ubuntu over CentOS or vice versa comes down to personal preference. However, there are real pros and cons of each.

      CentOS

      Pros: Highly reliable and stable for enterprise workloads, a free variant of the well-trusted Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), each major version serves or up to 10 years with free security updates for 7-10 years, less support required, lightweight.

      Cons: Less frequent updates, lacks feature richness compared to other operating systems.

      Ubuntu

      Pros: Frequent updates, feature rich, leading edge, developer friendly, stable, support for five years for major releases.

      Cons: Higher resource consumption, less secure out of the box, requires more support to stay up to date.

      For a quick comparison, reference this side-by-side look from our friends at best-web-hosting.org:4

      Take the Next Step

      As a managed infrastructure and cloud hosting provider, we’re fans of all things Linux (and Windows), and hope you found this article helpful. If you’d like to learn more about these Linux distributions, how you can use them on our platform, or just want to talk shop, drop a question in the comments or schedule a free consultation with one of SingleHop’s server OS experts.

       Links, References, Further Reading:

      1. DistroWatch.com: https://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major
      2. Web Technology Surveys: https://w3techs.com/technologies/comparison/os-centos,os-ubuntu
      3. TedBlog: https://blog.ted.com/further-reading-on-ubuntu/
      4. Best-Web-Hosting:https://best-web-hosting.org/centos-vs-ubuntu-2018/

      On-Demand, Enterprise-Class Dedicated Servers

      Power your mission-critical workloads with bare metal services only found at SingleHop.



      Source link