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      Deploying

      Deploying Microservices as Kubernetes DaemonSets and Jobs


      How to Join

      This Tech Talk is free and open to everyone. Register below to get a link to join the live stream or receive the video recording after it airs.

      Date Time RSVP
      August 25, 2021 11 a.m.–12 p.m. ET / 3–4 p.m. GMT

      About the Talk

      Migrating containerized workloads to Kubernetes? See when and how to use Kubernetes
      DaemonSets and Jobs to deploy your application or microservice.

      What You’ll Learn

      • How to distinguish between the different use cases for Kubernetes DaemonSets and Jobs
      • How to create a YAML manifest for a DaemonSet and Job
      • How to create and inspect a Kubernetes DaemonSet and Job

      This Talk Is Designed For

      • Anyone running containerized workloads in a non-Kubernetes environment
      • Anyone looking to gradually migrate to Kubernetes

      Prerequisites

      • You have containerized an application or microservice
      • You have basic knowledge of containers and Kubernetes

      Resources

      Kubernetes for Full-Stack Developers: Community Curriculum and eBook
      Kubernetes on DigitalOcean: Docs and Quickstart
      How to Deploy Your Application or Microservice on Kubernetes
      Kubernetes Docs: DaemonSet
      Kubernetes Docs: Jobs

      To join the live Tech Talk, register here.



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      Deploying MongoDB With Redundancy



      Part of the Series:
      MongoDB Security: Best Practices to Keep Your Data Safe

      MongoDB, also known as Mongo, is a document database used in many modern web applications. As with any database management system, it’s critical that those responsible for managing a Mongo database adhere to the recommended security best practices, both to prevent data from being lost in the event of a disaster and to keep it out of the hands of malicious actors.

      This series of conceptual articles provides a high-level overview of MongoDB’s built-in security features while also highlighting some general database security best practices.

      No matter what precautions you or your cloud provider take to prevent them, computers are always at risk of hardware failure. An important part of managing any computer system, not just a MongoDB installation, is to make regular backups of your important information. By taking and storing backups of your data, you can restore your application to working order if your database server crashes and your original data is lost.

      Just as you should regularly back up your MongoDB data, it’s equally important that you store those backups in a separate location from the server hosting your database. If you were to store your backups in the same data center as your database, both the database and your backups would be unavailable if the data center were to experience a failure and you wouldn’t be able to use the backups to get your application back online.

      Replication is a practice that’s similar to making backups: where making a backup involves taking a point-in-time snapshot of all the data held in a database, replication involves constantly synchronizing data across multiple separate databases. It’s often useful to have multiple replicas of your data, as this provides redundancy in case one of the database servers fails and can also improve a database’s availability and scalability, as well as reduce read latencies. In MongoDB, a group of servers that maintain the same data set through replication are referred to as a replica set.

      The official documentation recommends that any Mongo database used in a production environment be deployed as a replica set, since MongoDB replica sets employ a feature known as automatic failover. This means that if the primary fails and is unable to communicate with the secondary members for a predetermined amount of time, the secondary members will automatically elect a new primary member, thereby ensuring that your data remains available to your application or the clients that depend on it.



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      Deploying Your Python Applications


      How to Join

      This Tech Talk is free and open to everyone. Register below to get a link to join the live stream or receive the video recording after it airs.

      Date Time RSVP
      May 26, 2021 11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. ET / 3:00–4:00 p.m. GMT

      About the Talk

      Stuck trying to deploy your Python applications? Join Mason Egger as he demonstrates how to deploy Python applications to servers, containers, and PaaS.

      What You’ll Learn

      • What are WSGI and ASGI, and why they’re needed
      • How to deploy Python applications using Gunicorn to a traditional web server
      • How to containerize your application for deployment as microservices
      • How to deploy your application to App Platform, DigitalOcean’s PaaS (Platform as a Service)

      This Talk Is Designed For

      Python developers who want to deploy applications.

      Prerequisites

      Knowledge of a Python web framework: Flask, Django, FastAPI, etc.

      Resources

      Python Tutorial Series
      How to Deploy a Django App on DigitalOcean App Platform
      How to Make a Web App Using Flask in Python 3

      To join the live Tech Talk, register here.



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