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      Network Route Optimization Made Easy with Performance IP (Demo)


      Latency. It’s the mortal enemy of virtual dragon slayers, the bane of digital advertisers and the adversary of online retailers. Every end user has experienced the negative effects of latency, and even though they don’t always understand the intricacies of routing traffic through a global network, their responses to that latency can have a lasting impact on the companies whose networks aren’t functioning at peak performance.

      Consider this: More than seven in 10 online gamers will play a lagging game for less than 10 minutes before quitting. As much as 78 percent of end users will go to a competitor’s site due to poor performance. And a one second delay can cause an 11 percent drop in page views, a seven percent drop in conversions and a 16 percent drop in customer satisfaction. For online merchants, even the big boys like Amazon, each one-second delay in page load time can lead to losses of $1.6 billion annually.

      Milliseconds matter. Anyone focused on network optimization knows this. But did you know that Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) only routes traffic through the best path around 18 percent of the time? The lowest number of hops does not equate to the fastest route. And yet seeking a path with the least hops is the default.

      What if there was a better way to find the lowest latency route to reach your end users?

      Find the Fastest Network Route with Performance IP®

      With INAP, finding the lowest latency route doesn’t require you to lift a finger. Customers in our data centers are connected to our robust global network and proprietary route optimization engine. Performance IP® enhances BGP by assessing the best-performing routes in real time.

      This technology makes a daily average of nearly 500 million optimization across our global network to automatically put your outbound traffic on the best-performing route. And with the meshed infrastructure of Tier 1 ISPs and our global network, you don’t have to choose between reliability, connectivity and speed. You can download the data sheet on Performance IP®here.

      “In online games, lag kills,” said Todd Harris, COO of Hi-Rez Studios, an INAP customer. “To deliver the best experience, we have to make sure that gamers are able to play on the best network while using the most efficient route. INAP delivers all of that.”

      Skeptical about what Performance IP® can do for you? Let’s run a destination test. Below, we’ll take you through the test step by step so you can get the most out of the demo when you try it for yourself.

      Breaking Down the Performance IP® Demo

      You can access the demo from the INAP homepage or the Performance IP® page. Get started by entering your website URL or any destination IP. We’ll use ca.gov for our test purposes.

      Performance IP Homepage

      Next, choose your source location. The locations in the drop-down menu represent INAP’s data centers and network points of presence where you can take advantage of the Performance IP® service. Each market has a different blend of Tier 1 ISPs. Performance IP® measures all carrier routes out of the data center and optimizes your traffic on the fastest route to your target address.

      Here, we’re running the test out of our Atlanta flagship data center, but you can test out all of our markets with the demo. We’ll run the route optimization test to our sample website, which is located in California. Once you have all your information entered, click “Run Destination Test.”

      Destination test
      Click to view full-size image.

      As you can see from the result of our test above, the shortest distance is not the lowest latency path. Each Greek letter on the chart represents an automonous system (AS). The Performance IP® service looked at seven carriers in this scenario and was able to optimize the route so that our traffic gets to its destination 21.50 percent faster—16.017 ms faster—than the slowest carrier.

      Destination Test Summary
      Click to view full-size image.

      In the traceroute chart above, we can study the latency for the each carrier more closely. Although in this scenario the best perfroming carrier passed though three automous systems while all of the other carriers passed through only two, it was still the fastest. Note that default BGP protocol would have sent us through any of the other carriers, including the slowest route through Carrier 3.

      Once you’ve had time to adequately study the outcome of the test, click “Continue” to see carrier performance over the last month. This chart measures the percentage of carrier prefixes originating from our Atlanta POP that had the best and worst performing routes for any given day of the month. While individual carrier performance can vary radically, if you’re a Performance IP® customer this won’t be a concern for you. Since the engine measures network paths millions of times a day, Performance IP® sends outbound traffic along the lowest latency path virtually 100 percent of the time.

      The final tab of the demo allows you to study our product line-up and open a chat to get a quote. Performance IP® is available for INAP colocation customers and is included with INAP Cloud products. If you’re not interested in these infrastructure solutions, you can still purchase Performance IP® from one of our data centers and connect it to your environment.

      Run the test for yourself, or chat with us now to get a quote.

      Explore the INAP Performance IP® Demo.

      LEARN MORE

      Laura Vietmeyer


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      DART Box™ – Cloud Seeding Made Easy


      Setting up your backup and disaster recovery data in the cloud—called seeding—is the first step in any business continuity plan. The process has two considerations that we at INAP treat with utmost care: speed and security.

      Our proprietary DART Box™ (Data Acquisition and Recovery Transfer) seeding system is the answer to both, allowing you to safely and securely ship large amounts of data into our enterprise, production-grade cloud storage.

      INAP dart box

      FAQ: Isn’t shipping physical media slower and less secure?

      Not necessarily. While creating your first backup over the internet is optimal for small amounts of data, the rate of transfer depends on the congestion of the public network, providers and routers.

      That’s why large datasets in the terabytes can easily take too long for business continuity migration schedules. For security, encryption is typically a safe bet, but there will always be a small risk of the data being intercepted.

      Transferring Large Quantities of Data? Use the DART Box™ System.

      Large datasets are best seeded with physical media; however, traditional physical media like hard drives, CDs and thumb drives must be encrypted and securely shipped for maximum peace of mind.

      With INAP’s DART Box system, shipping your organization’s mission-critical data is both safe and simple. We send you specially encrypted 6 TB hard drives in a tamperproof box that includes everything needed to get your business continuity plan moving and digitally secure your data. In addition, the box comes with security measures that will protect your hardware from physical tampering or alert you to any attempts.

      dart box contents

      Locally transfer your data, ship it to INAP, and our data center technicians will take care of the rest. The service is provided free of charge with all INAP business continuity plans.

      Remember, this is a one-time operation: Once the seeding process is complete, you’ll only need to remotely back up the data that changes after the initial transfer. Chat with us to learn more about the DART Box and explore our full suite of security, compliance and business continuity solutions.

      Explore INAP Disaster Recovery as a Service.

      LEARN MORE

      Ryan Hunt
      • Sr. Communications Manager


      Ryan Hunt is Senior Communications Manager. READ MORE



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      How to Schedule Posts in WordPress (3 Easy Methods)


      Publishing posts to your blog on a regular basis is essential. However, several issues might get in the way of consistent and optimized publishing, such as a full workload, trouble posting during high-traffic periods, or even the decision to take a vacation. Even expert bloggers need a little R ‘n R now and then.

      Fortunately, if you built your website with WordPress, there are a number of ways you can schedule your posts for publication ahead of time. Scheduling your posts enables you to put fresh content up on your site at regular intervals — without having to actually log in each time.

      In this article, we’ll explain the advantages of scheduling blog posts on your WordPress site. Then we’ll share a few methods for doing so, and go over some tips for troubleshooting issues that may arise during the process. Let’s dive in!

      Why It’s Smart to Schedule Your Blog Posts

      Creating a schedule for your blog posts is the best way to ensure that you always have fresh content. Plus, when you post regularly, readers will always know when to expect new articles. This can help keep them engaged and coming back regularly.

      On top of that, scheduling posts can help you manage your workload. When you have a busy week coming up, you can write your posts ahead of time and set a future publication date and specific time for each. Scheduled posts can also make it possible for you to take a vacation from your blog.

      In addition, assigning publication dates and times is useful for posting during peak traffic hours. Your readers may be most active on your site during a time of day you have to be away from your computer, for example. Automated publication lets you make new posts live at the ideal moment.

      How to Schedule Posts in WordPress (3 Methods)

      Fortunately, there are several ways to schedule posts on your WordPress website, so you can choose the method that works best for you. Let’s look at three of the most common options.

      1. Schedule Posts in the Block Editor

      WordPress has innate post scheduling capabilities, which you can access right from the editor screen. Let’s look at how to set a post up for automatic publication in the Block Editor (which you have access to if your WordPress version is 5.0 or higher).

      Open up the post you want to schedule, and in the sidebar to the right, select the Document tab. Under Status & Visibility, you’ll see that your post is set to publish Immediately by default.

      The Status and Visibility settings.

      If you click the link, it will open a calendar where you can select a future date and time. Once you’ve done so, Immediately will change to your specified publication time in the sidebar. Click anywhere outside the calendar to close it.

      Setting the publication date.

      When you’ve given your post one final read-through and are sure it’s ready to go, click on the blue Schedule button at the top of the editor.

      The Schedule button.

      You’ll have the chance to review and edit your post’s publication date and time and set its visibility status to Private, Public, or Password-Protected. WordPress will also point out any last-minute items you may want to address.

      Previewing the scheduled publication date and time.

      When you’re happy with your settings, select the blue Schedule button again.

      Scheduled post verification.

      You should receive a final notification that your post has been set to publish at the date and time you chose. That’s all you have to do!

      2. Set Up Scheduled Posts in the Classic Editor

      If you’re still using the Classic WordPress Editor, never fear. You can still easily set up scheduled posts. Simply head over to the post you want to schedule and check out the Publish widget.

      The Publish widget.

      Just like in the Block Editor, your post will be set to publish immediately by default. Click on Edit next to Publish immediately, which lets you access the date and time settings.

      The scheduled publication date and time settings.

      There’s no fancy calendar here, but it’s still easy enough to set your desired publication date and time. Just make sure to use the 24-hour clock.

      Then, click on OK when you’re done. After you’ve finalized your post’s details, select the blue Schedule button in the Publish widget.

      The Schedule button.

      You should receive a notification that your post has been scheduled and see its changed status in the Publish widget.

      Scheduled post verification.

      If you need to make any updates, you can do so by clicking on the blue Edit link next to any of the settings. Be sure to hit the Update button afterward.

      3. Use a Plugin to Schedule Posts

      If you want to access more advanced automatic publishing features, you may want to consider WordPress plugins. Let’s look at two of the best options.

      WP Scheduled Posts

      The WP Scheduled Posts plugin.

      WP Scheduled Posts adds an editorial calendar to your WordPress dashboard. You can drag and drop posts to schedule them so setting publication dates is fast and easy. This tool also helps you keep track of all your authors if you have multiple people creating content.

      You can even add new posts right in the calendar — save those great ideas you have for a future date. The plugin is free to download, but if you opt for a premium plan, you’ll gain access to additional features including the ‘Auto Scheduler’ and ‘Missed Post Handler.’

      CoSchedule

      The CoSchedule plugin.

      If you need a more complete content and marketing scheduling system, check out CoSchedule. While you’ll still have to follow the steps for scheduling posts in the WordPress editor as described above, with CoSchedule, you can manage your scheduled blog posts, social media content, and marketing campaigns from a single calendar right in your WordPress dashboard.

      You can download the CoSchedule WordPress plugin for free, but you won’t be able to do anything with it unless you also have a paid CoSchedule account. Plans for those accounts start at $80 per month.

      Troubleshooting Issues With WordPress Scheduled Posts

      Scheduling posts in WordPress is simple, but there are a few issues you may run into. Fortunately, the most common problems have easy solutions.

      Setting the Right Timezone

      First, it’s important to make sure that when you’ve chosen a publication date and time, they’re set to the right time zone.

      The WordPress Timezone settings.

      You can check your site’s time zone settings by going to Settings > General in your WordPress dashboard, and scrolling down to Timezone. There, you can see the time zone your site is currently set to, and change it if need be.

      Handling Missed Posts

      You’ll also want a failsafe in case something goes wrong, and a post you’ve slated for publication doesn’t go live as expected. For this, we suggest looking into a plugin such as Scheduled Post Trigger, which checks for and publishes missed scheduled posts.

      The Scheduled Posts Trigger plugin.

      This way, if your post doesn’t publish automatically for whatever reason, the plugin can still get your content up on your site (even if it’s a little late). If you’re using the premium version of WP Scheduled Posts, its ‘Missed Posts Handler’ feature works in much the same way.

      Unscheduling Posts

      Finally, there may be times when you’ve set up a post for future publication, and then you decide you want to publish it right away instead. To do this in the Classic Editor, head over to the Publish widget and click on Edit next to the date by Scheduled for. Change the settings to the current date and time, and then select OK.

      Unscheduling a post.

      Click on the blue button, which will say either Update or Publish. Once you do, you should receive a notification that your post has been published.

      Publishing an unscheduled post.

      In the Block Editor, this functionality works much the same. Change the scheduled date and time to the current moment, and click outside the calendar to exit the feature. The blue button at the top of the editor will now say Publish.

      Unscheduling and publishing a post. Note the blue Publish button.

      Select it, and WordPress will put the post up on your site immediately.

      Keep Us Posted

      Posting consistently on your WordPress blog is key to your site’s success. Scheduling your blog posts in advance can help you gain more loyal followers, while also making it easier for you to manage your site over time.

      Do you have any questions about how to schedule posts in WordPress? Follow us on Twitter and let us know!





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