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      How To Fix the WordPress Memory Exhausted Error by Increasing Your Site’s PHP Memory Limit


      As you may know, WordPress is built using PHP. This programming language is incredibly flexible, but it also has a few drawbacks. For example, if you don’t allocate enough memory for your WordPress installation, you might start running into the occasional “PHP Memory Exhausted” error.

      In a nutshell, this error means your server isn’t allocating enough resources for WordPress to execute the PHP scripts it needs to function properly. This issue can negatively affect your site’s functionality, but there are several ways you can fix and even prevent it.

      In this article, we’ll show you how to fix the memory exhausted problem by increasing your PHP memory limit. However, first, let’s talk about how to recognize this error and what it means!

      Why You’re Seeing a WordPress Memory Limit Error on Your Site

      As we mentioned earlier, the PHP memory limit error means you’re not allocating enough resources for your WordPress installation to function correctly. The problem usually presents itself with a message such as:

      The memory exhausted PHP fatal error.

      Don’t be scared by the word “fatal,” though. Your website isn’t broken, but you will need to make some changes to your WordPress installation if you want it to work properly. Specifically, you’ll want to increase your PHP memory limit.

      By “PHP memory limit,” we mean the amount of server memory that’s allocated to run PHP scripts. By default, that number should be around 64 MB or higher. In most cases, 64 MB is more than enough, however.

      Most hosting servers provide you with far more memory than that, so increasing the PHP allowed memory size shouldn’t negatively impact your website’s performance whatsoever. In fact, unless you’re using a cheap web host or you set up WordPress manually, your PHP memory limit shouldn’t be an issue at all.

      You can easily check to see what your PHP memory limit is by accessing your WordPress dashboard and navigating to Tools > Site Health > Info. Next, you can click on the Server tab and look for the PHP memory limit entry.

      A website with a high PHP memory size.

      Within the Server tab, you can also check other information such as your PHP version and the PHP time limit. The latter variable, which is in seconds, defines how long PHP scripts have to execute before they time out.

      For now, let’s focus on the PHP memory limit. As you can see, the above example has quite a high limit, which means that the website is unlikely to run into a WordPress Memory Exhausted error.

      If your site has a low memory limit (<64 MB), it’s in your best interests to increase it. There are a couple of ways you can do so.

      Take Your WordPress Website to the Next Level

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      How to Resolve the WordPress Memory Limit Error (2 Methods)

      As far as WordPress errors go, this one has a clear-cut cause and solution. You’re not allocating enough memory for your PHP installation, so you need to increase that number. In this section, we’ll go over two methods you can use: one manual technique and one that requires your wallet.

      1. Increase the PHP Memory Allocated to Your Website Manually

      WordPress enables you to declare your allowed memory size manually by modifying one of two files: .htaccess and wp-config.php. However, changing your WordPress installation’s .htaccess file can lead to site-wide errors since that file governs how it interacts with your server.

      Increasing your PHP memory limit through wp-config.php is, in most cases, the safest option, and it’s remarkably easy to do. All you need is a Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP) client such as FileZilla that you can use to connect to your website.

      Once you access your website via SFTP, open the WordPress root folder and look for the wp-config.php file within it.

      A WordPress wp-config.php file.

      Open that file using a text editor, and you should see something like this:

      Editing a wp-config.php file.

      To increase your PHP memory limit, you can simply add a single line of code anywhere after the <?php tag and before the part of the file that reads “/* That’s all, stop editing! Happy blogging. */”.

      This is the line of code to add:

      define( 'WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', 'XXXM' );

      You’ll need to replace the “XXX” variable within that line with the amount of memory you want to allocate to PHP. As we mentioned before, the absolute minimum you should settle for is 64 MB.

      However, you can also double the number to play it safe or increase it even further. For example, if you set a PHP memory limit of 256 MB, it would look like this:

      define( 'WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', ‘256M’);

      Once you’re set on a number, save the changes to wp-config.php and close the editor. Now return to your WordPress dashboard and navigate to Tools > Site Health > Info > Server to see if the changes went through.

      In some cases, declaring your PHP memory limit manually won’t work because you don’t have the necessary permissions to change that value. If you can’t adjust your WordPress memory size manually, that leaves you with one other option.

      2. Upgrade Your Website’s Hosting Plan

      Typically, if you use a decent WordPress hosting provider, you won’t need to worry about increasing your PHP memory limit. One caveat is that if you’re using shared hosting, you’ll likely face limited resources. So if you’re encountering this error, it might be time to upgrade to a better hosting plan.

      Upgrading your hosting package will usually result in an increase in available PHP memory. That means you’re much less likely to run into a WordPress memory limit error. The only limiting factor is your budget.

      If you can’t upgrade hosting plans right now, it might be worth contacting your provider’s support team and seeing if they can increase your PHP memory limit on their end. If they can’t, it might be time to switch to a better WordPress host that offers high PHP memory limits on affordable plans.

      Skip the Stress

      Avoid troubleshooting when you sign up for DreamPress. Our friendly WordPress experts are available 24/7 to help solve website problems — big or small.

      Want More WordPress Error Tips?

      Once you increase PHP memory on your WordPress website, we can help tackle other issues. We’ve put together several tutorials to help you troubleshoot every error message:

      Want more information on WordPress site management? Check out our WordPress Tutorials, a collection of guides designed to help you navigate the WordPress dashboard like an expert.

      Increasing PHP Memory Limit

      Running into a PHP fatal error can be worrying, but it’s not necessarily a cause for concern. Learning how to increase your PHP memory limit is relatively simple if you don’t mind using an SFTP client and adding a single line of code to one of WordPress’ core files.

      The alternative is to upgrade your hosting plan or opt for a better provider. Most WordPress-friendly hosting options offer high limits by default, so you’ll never run into a PHP memory exhausted error ever again.

      If you’re ready to use a web host optimized for WordPress websites, check out our DreamPress hosting packages! We offer optimized WordPress setups, so you spend less time troubleshooting errors and more time working on your website.



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      How to Fix the Sidebar Below Content Error in WordPress (In 3 Steps)


      Perfecting your WordPress website’s layout can be a lot of work, but it’s also essential for User Experience (UX), engagement, and conversions. Therefore, it can be frustrating when a seemingly random error causes a disruption to your site’s display — such as your sidebar suddenly appearing below the content rather than to the side.

      While there are a few potential causes, it primarily comes down to issues with the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) or Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Fortunately, the issues are relatively easy to fix, so you can quickly get your site back in tip-top shape.

      In this article, we’ll walk through the common causes of this error, then show you how to resolve it in three simple steps. Let’s get started!

      Common Causes of the Sidebar Dropping Below the Content in WordPress

      Sidebars in WordPress are content areas meant to be displayed either to the left or right of the page’s main segment (or sometimes both). They often contain widgets, sign-up forms, links to related posts, or similar content that you’d want to include across your site.

      Due to various bugs or errors, your sidebars may sometimes appear at the bottom of the page, rather than to the left or right. Needless to say, this can easily ruin a well-designed website.

      The primary cause of this behavior is problems with either the HTML or CSS on your site. It is usually a result of direct changes you’ve made to your site’s code, such as a theme or plugin file.

      For example, perhaps there is an extra or undisclosed <div> tag on the page. The problem could even be attributed to incorrect width and floating settings in your CSS. Fortunately, fixing this error is easy enough.

      Skip the Stress

      Avoid troubleshooting when you sign up for DreamPress. Our friendly WordPress experts are available 24/7 to help solve website problems — big or small.

      How to Fix the WordPress Sidebar Below Content Error (In 3 Steps)

      Now that you know the potential causes of this perplexing error, it’s time to correct it. We recommend running through the following three steps in order, moving on to the next only if the previous one didn’t work. Before getting started, remember to make a backup of your site just in case.

      Step 1: Undo Your Most Recent Changes

      The first step is also the simplest. If your sidebar moved after making a change to your site — whether that’s installing a new plugin, adding custom code, or anything else — simply undo it. Reversing the action both gets your layout back to its original format and helps isolate the cause of the issue.

      So you can start by reversing the change and refreshing your site to see if the sidebar is back in its proper place. If so, you can then look for potential issues with whatever changes you were attempting to make. For example, if you installed a new plugin, check for alternatives. If you altered or added to your site’s code, look for any typos or syntax errors.

      Step 2: Fix Unclosed <div> Tags or Remove Extra <div> Tags

      Often, an unclosed or extra <div> tag in your site’s code is the cause of the WordPress sidebar error. These HTML tags define the boundaries of sections on your website. If they’re incorrectly placed, browsers won’t render the site properly (hence the wandering sidebar).

      Here’s an example of a correctly-formatted page:

      Correctly formatted <div> tags on a page.

      Below is the same page with an unclosed <div> tag:

      Incorrect <div> tags causing elements to appear in the wrong place.

      You can see that what should be the closing <div> tag is missing the forward slash. As a result, the browser doesn’t know that it’s meant to be closed, and the content that should be outside the element is now inside.

      To fix this, comb through any template files you’ve modified and look for missing or extra tags. Generally, these errors can be found in the “template parts” files of your WordPress theme. To get there, head to your WordPress dashboard and navigate to Appearance > Theme Editor.

      The WordPress Theme Editor.

      Choose the correct theme from the drop-down menu at the top, and then locate the template parts section in the sidebar.

      Template parts in the WordPress Theme Editor.

      The templates that generate pages and posts are usually under the content section. Find the one you need from the list, check it, and make any corrections. Then you can click on Update File to save your changes.

      If you know which file you edited, you can jump straight there. Otherwise, you’ll need to check them all for inconsistencies.

      Step 3: Correct CSS Issues

      Another frequent cause of this error is found in your site’s CSS. The WordPress Customizer’s Additional CSS section enables you to add custom CSS to your site.

      The WordPress Customizer Additional CSS section.

      If you’ve used this feature or edited the CSS through other means, you may have formatted the code incorrectly. In the case of moving sidebars, the most common culprit is the “width” property.

      You should double-check that the sum of the widths of the Content and Sidebar elements doesn’t exceed the width of the Wrap element. If it does, the smaller element will be pushed down in order to fit.

      Tools to Make Troubleshooting Sidebar Issues Easier

      You can also troubleshoot the issue yourself without using code. There are several online tools online that can validate your code and check it for errors.

      You can use the W3C Markup Validation Service to check HTML code. The W3C CSS Validation Service is the CSS counterpart. Online Web Check is also an excellent tool that works for both HTML and CSS.

      These services are also fantastic if you just want a second set of eyes on your code, regardless of skill level. A quick double-check never hurt anyone!

      You could also take fixing WordPress errors off your to-do list with our DreamCare service. Our team of experts handle everything on the backend of your site to make sure it’s safe, secure, and always up.

      Additional WordPress Resources

      Say goodbye to broken links and error messages! We’ve put together several guides to help you troubleshoot every kind of WordPress problem:

      If you’re looking for more WordPress tips and hacks, check out our WordPress Tutorials, a collection of guides that’ll help you navigate the WordPress admin area like a pro.

      Take Your WordPress Site to the Next Level

      Whether you need help choosing the right WordPress plugin, creating a child theme, or writing your first blog post, we can help! Subscribe to our monthly digest so you never miss an article.

      Solving the Sidebar Error

      If you’ve spent time building a beautiful WordPress website, you likely don’t want anything to take away from it — least of all sudden errors. Fortunately, if the problem is that your sidebars are appearing below your content, the fix is relatively simple!

      To correct the sidebar appearing below content error, you can follow these three steps:

      1. Undo any changes you made to your site just prior to the error appearing.
      2. Check for and fix unclosed or extra <div> tags in your code.
      3. Verify that your site’s CSS is correct.

      If you’d rather spend your time working on your business instead of troubleshooting your website, consider switching to DreamPress. With our managed WordPress hosting plans, we take care of the problems for you, so you can stay focused on what really matters.



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      How to Fix White Text and Missing Buttons in the WordPress Visual Editor (5 Steps)


      Picture this: You log in to your WordPress dashboard to write a new blog post. You fire up the Classic Editor, only to find a problem. All of the formatting buttons are missing, and the text is white and impossible to see.

      Encountering this error can be frustrating. It may even prevent you from getting work done, potentially putting you behind schedule. Fortunately, there are several solutions to this issue.

      In this article, we’ll look at exactly what this error involves and then walk you through how to fix it in five steps. Let’s get started!

      An Introduction to the White Text and Missing Buttons Error in the WordPress Visual Editor

      Before we dig into this error, let’s clarify exactly what we mean by the “visual editor.” This refers to the nicely-formatted editor you use to create your posts or pages in WordPress, whether that’s the Classic Editor or the newer Block Editor.

      The error we’re dealing with in this article occurs with the visual editor when using the Classic Editor plugin.

      The WordPress visual editor.

      The formatting buttons along the top suddenly vanish. Additionally, the text you write in the editor field may appear the same color as the background, making it unreadable.

      This makes using the Classic Editor pretty much impossible. If you rely on it to create your blog content, you’ll want to fix this problem as quickly as possible. Fortunately, this issue isn’t difficult to correct.

      What to Do Before You Start Troubleshooting

      Before you start troubleshooting, we recommend making a backup of your site. If you’re using DreamHost, we make the backup process incredibly easy.

      If you’re using a different hosting provider, it likely also offers a backup solution. You can consult the appropriate documentation for instructions. You can also opt for a WordPress backup plugin such as UpdraftPlus.

      Skip the WordPress Error Stress

      Avoid troubleshooting when you sign up for DreamPress. Our friendly WordPress experts are available 24/7 to help solve website problems — big or small.

      How to Fix White Text and Missing Buttons in the WordPress Visual Editor (In 5 Steps)

      This error is most likely either a problem with your browser cache or with the Classic Editor itself  — both of which can be easily fixed. We recommend following these five steps in order, and only proceeding to the next if you’re still experiencing the issue.

      Step 1: Clear Your Browser Cache

      The first and simplest method you can try is clearing your browser cache. Your browser saves versions of websites you visit (including your WordPress editor) to make loading them quicker.

      If your cache is corrupted or has stored a version of a page with errors, it may continue to load the broken page. Clearing the cache forces the browser to load a fresh copy of the editor, hopefully resolving the problem.

      To clear your cache in Google Chrome, click on the three-dot menu icon in the upper-right corner, and then click on Settings. Under the Privacy and security section, select Clear browsing data.

      Options for clearing user data and cache in Google Chrome.

      In the pop-up, make sure only Cached images and files is selected, and then click on Clear data. If you don’t use Chrome or want further guidance, you can refer to our guide on clearing your browser cache.

      Step 2: Deactivate All of Your WordPress Plugins

      Next, you can check if a plugin might be causing the issue. The best way to do this is to deactivate all your plugins (except for the Classic Editor), check to see if the problem is resolved, and then re-enable them one by one until the error returns.

      At that point, you’ll have isolated the problematic plugin. Then you can check for updates, look for alternatives, or simply leave it deactivated if it’s one you don’t depend on.

      To deactivate your WordPress plugins, head to the dashboard and navigate to Plugins > Installed Plugins.

      Check the box next to all of the plugins except for the Classic Editor. In the Bulk actions box, you can choose Deactivate and click on Apply. Then reload the WordPress editor and verify that everything is working properly.

      If deactivating your plugins resolved the error, your next step is to isolate the plugin that was causing it. You can go down the list one by one and click on the Activate button under the plugin’s name. After each one is reactivated, check to see if the error has reappeared. If not, you can move on until you find the problematic plugin.

      Step 3: Replace the TinyMCE Folder

      TinyMCE is the technical name for the WordPress Classic Editor. It’s an open-source editor that’s used by quite a few platforms, in addition to WordPress.

      An issue with the TinyMCE files can cause the editor’s buttons to disappear. To fix this, you can replace the folder with a fresh copy.

      First, download the version of WordPress your site is using. You can find the current version number by checking the bottom-right corner of any page in your WordPress dashboard.

      The WordPress version in use on a website.

      Open up the WordPress zip file and move the TinyMCE folder somewhere else, such as your desktop. It’s located at wp-includes/js/tinymce.

      Finally, you’ll need to access your WordPress site’s file system and replace the old folder with the new one. Head to your DreamPress account (see Step 1 for instructions). Under the Details section, click on Manage Files to open the DreamHost file browser.

      The DreamHost file manager.

      If you’re not a DreamHost customer, you can also access your site via Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP). Navigate to wp-includes/js and upload the new copy of the TinyMCE folder using the “up arrow” button in the bottom left. Then you can refresh your WordPress dashboard and check the editor again.

      Step 4: Modify the wp-config.php File

      If the above fixes haven’t worked, you can try modifying your wp-config.php file to force WordPress to load scripts individually. To do so, start by opening up your WordPress site in the DreamHost file manager or via SFTP, as outlined above.

      The wp-config.php file is located in the root directory of your site. Simply add the following line of code to the top of the file, right after the opening <php> tag:

      define(‘CONCATENATE_SCRIPTS’,false);

      Here’s what your code should look like:

      The wp-config.php file, showing the location of the opening <php> tag.

      When you’re done, save the file, refresh your site, and then try to load the visual editor again. If you’re still seeing the error message, proceed to the last step.

      Step 5: Install the Advanced Editor Tools Plugin

      Previously known as TinyMCE Advanced, the Advanced Editor Tools plugin is a version of the TinyMCE script that offers additional features.

      The Advanced Editor Tools plugin.

      Essentially, it provides you with a hybrid of the TinyMCE editor and the Block Editor. Also, it’s free to download and use.

      After you install and activate it, you can locate the settings by navigating to Settings > Advanced Editor Tools.

      The Advanced Editor Tools plugin settings.

      Once it’s activated and you’ve configured the settings to your liking, refresh your WordPress site. Now, when you go to a new WordPress post or page, you should see that the previously-missing buttons appear in your visual editor.

      Additional WordPress Issue Resources

      Want to learn more about fixing common WordPress errors? We’ve put together several guides to help you.

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      WordPress Visual Editor Problem, Solved

      If your WordPress editor is experiencing problems, such as unreadable white text or disappearing buttons, don’t worry. Like many WordPress errors, this one is relatively simple to fix, and there are multiple methods you can try.

      As we’ve discussed, you can follow these five steps to resolve the white text and missing buttons error in the WordPress editor:

      1. Clear your browser cache.
      2. Deactivate your WordPress plugins.
      3. Replace the TinyMCE folder with a fresh copy.
      4. Modify your wp-config.php file.
      5. Install the Advanced Editor Tools plugin.

      If you want to make troubleshooting easier, consider using DreamPress, our managed WordPress hosting solution. With DreamPress, we take care of problems for you, so you can focus on what matters.



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