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      Common WordPress Image Upload Issues and How to Fix Them (5 Methods)


      Since about 65% of people are visual learners, images are an important part of any website. And when you’re regularly uploading images for your WordPress website, it’s natural to run into the occasion error message.

      Fortunately, there are ways to diagnose even the vaguest image upload issue. By running through a checklist of common fixes, you should have no problems adding beautiful, eye-catching visuals to your website.

      In this article, we’ll look at why image-related errors can be tricky to diagnose. We’ll then share five solutions to try the next time the WordPress Media Library doesn’t want to cooperate with your creative vision. Let’s get started!

      An Introduction to WordPress Image Errors (And Why They’re a Problem)

      Beautiful, eye-catching images are a crucial part of almost any website. If you’re running an e-commerce store, product images are particularly important for driving sales, as they enable people to see what they’re purchasing. Maybe that explains why on average, images make up almost 17% of a web page’s total weight.

      The WordPress media library upload screen.

      However, uploading images to WordPress isn’t always straightforward. Sometimes, this popular Content Management System (CMS) may display a failure to upload error. These issues are notoriously difficult to diagnose, as they’re triggered by a wide range of factors. That can make it difficult to know where to start to address the problem.

      The good news? We can walk you through the steps we take to take to identify and fix image upload issues in WordPress.

      We’ll Fix Your Image Upload Issue

      Avoid troubleshooting when you sign up for DreamPress. Our friendly WordPress experts are available 24/7 to help solve website problems — big or small.

      Common WordPress Image Upload Errors and How to Fix Them (5 Methods)

      Nothing is more frustrating than having your workflow interrupted by a vague error message. Here are five ways to fix upload errors, so you can get back to adding striking visuals to your website.

      1. Rename, Resize, and Re-Upload the Image

      If you’re only encountering issues with a specific image, you can start by taking a look at the file’s name. If you’re using special characters ($, *, &, #) or accent letters (ñ, á, é), these can cause issues with the WordPress uploader.

      The image may also be too large — both in terms of dimensions and file size. You can change an image’s dimensions using your favorite editing program. If you’re trying to upload a particularly high-resolution graphic, you can reduce the size without impacting the quality using a compression tool such as TinyPNG.

      The TinyPNG plugin upload screen.

      If you regularly encounter issues due to file size, then WordPress’ limit may be set too low. You can raise the limit by adding code to your site’s php.ini file:

      upload_max_filesize = 128M
      
      post_max_size = 128M
      
      max_execution_time = 300

      If your site doesn’t already contain a php.ini file, you can create it inside the PHP folder for the current PHP version your site is running.  Then, simply add the above code at the end of the file.

      2. Increase the Memory Limit

      When you try to upload an image, you may encounter the WordPress HTTP error. This can sometimes be caused by low server resources or unusual traffic. For this reason, it’s always worth waiting a few minutes and then attempting to re-upload the image.

      If the issue doesn’t resolve itself, then you may be exceeding the WordPress memory limit. You can increase the amount of memory that PHP has to use on your server by connecting to your site over SFTP.

      Next, open your wp-config file. You can then add the following, which will increase the limit to 256MB:

      define( 'WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', '256M' );

      If this doesn’t resolve your issue, your problem may be related to threading. WordPress processes images using either the GD Library or Imagick module, depending on which one is available.

      Imagick was designed to use multiple threads in order to accelerate image processing.  However, some shared hosting providers limit Imagick’s ability to use multiple threads, which can result in an HTTP error. You can often resolve this issue by adding the following to your .htaccess file:

      SetEnv MAGICK_THREAD_LIMIT 1.

      3. Deactivate Your Plugins

      Third-party software can sometimes interfere with your image uploads. If you’re using any plugins, it’s always worth deactivating each one in turn and testing to see whether this resolves your image upload issue.

      Deactivating plugins in the WordPress dashboard

      If a plugin is to blame, you can double-check to make sure you’re running the latest version. If you’ve fallen behind on your updates, you may be struggling with a problem that’s already been addressed.

      If you’re running the latest version, we recommend contacting the plugin’s developer to ensure that they’re aware of the issue. This can also be an opportunity to ask whether they plan to solve this problem in their next release. If the plugin is critical to your site and no fix is forthcoming, it may be time to look for an alternative solution.

      4. Clear the Cache

      If you’re using a caching plugin, then clearing the cache may be enough to resolve your image upload errors. It’s important to note, however, that it is incredibly rare for the cache to prevent a file upload, so we’re including this fix out of an abundance of caution.

      If you think that caching could be causing the error, the steps you take will depend on your chosen caching solution. For example, if you’re using the W3 Total Cache plugin, you can clear the cache by selecting Performance > Purge All Caches from the WordPress toolbar.

      Purging all caches in the WordPress dashboard Appearance menu.

      If you’re unsure how to clear the cache in your specific tool, the plugin’s Settings menu is often a good place to start. You can also check the developer’s official documentation for more details.

      5. Try the Browser Uploader

      If you’ve tried all of the above fixes and are still encountering problems, you can use your browser’s built-in file uploader. Unlike WordPress’ image uploader, the browser uploader doesn’t support multiple file selection or drag and drop. However, it can be a useful workaround when you need to upload an image quickly.

      To access the native image uploader, navigate to Media > Add New. You can then select the browser uploader link.

      Selecting the ‘browser uploader’ link in the WordPress native image uploader.

      Next, click on Choose file. This launches the familiar file selection dialog, where you can upload the image as normal. If this workaround succeeds, we recommend trying to upload an image using WordPress’ standard image uploader afterward, to see whether this has resolved your problem.

      Take Your WordPress Site to the Next Level

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      Additional WordPress Error Tutorials

      Once you’ve solved your image upload error, the adventure isn’t over. There’s always more to learn about WordPress! We’ve put together several tutorials to help you troubleshoot other common WordPress errors:

      Want more information on managing a WordPress site? Check out our WordPress Tutorials, a collection of guides designed to help you navigate the WordPress dashboard like an expert.

      WordPress Images Made Easy  

      Visuals are crucial for catching (and holding) the visitor’s attention, but image upload errors are frustratingly common. By following some simple steps, we’re confident that you can get your site back on track — even when the error message itself doesn’t provide much information.

      Let’s recap five ways to resolve common WordPress image upload issues:

      1. Rename, resize, and re-upload the image.
      2. Increase the memory limit.
      3. Deactivate your plugins.
      4. Clear the cache.
      5. Try the browser uploader.

      Are you tired of handling WordPress errors with no help? All of our DreamPress hosting packages include 24/7 customer support as a standard option. Regardless of the problem, our expert team will be on hand to help you get back on track!



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      How To Fix the WordPress Memory Exhausted Error by Increasing Your Site’s PHP Memory Limit


      As you may know, WordPress is built using PHP. This programming language is incredibly flexible, but it also has a few drawbacks. For example, if you don’t allocate enough memory for your WordPress installation, you might start running into the occasional “PHP Memory Exhausted” error.

      In a nutshell, this error means your server isn’t allocating enough resources for WordPress to execute the PHP scripts it needs to function properly. This issue can negatively affect your site’s functionality, but there are several ways you can fix and even prevent it.

      In this article, we’ll show you how to fix the memory exhausted problem by increasing your PHP memory limit. However, first, let’s talk about how to recognize this error and what it means!

      Why You’re Seeing a WordPress Memory Limit Error on Your Site

      As we mentioned earlier, the PHP memory limit error means you’re not allocating enough resources for your WordPress installation to function correctly. The problem usually presents itself with a message such as:

      The memory exhausted PHP fatal error.

      Don’t be scared by the word “fatal,” though. Your website isn’t broken, but you will need to make some changes to your WordPress installation if you want it to work properly. Specifically, you’ll want to increase your PHP memory limit.

      By “PHP memory limit,” we mean the amount of server memory that’s allocated to run PHP scripts. By default, that number should be around 64 MB or higher. In most cases, 64 MB is more than enough, however.

      Most hosting servers provide you with far more memory than that, so increasing the PHP allowed memory size shouldn’t negatively impact your website’s performance whatsoever. In fact, unless you’re using a cheap web host or you set up WordPress manually, your PHP memory limit shouldn’t be an issue at all.

      You can easily check to see what your PHP memory limit is by accessing your WordPress dashboard and navigating to Tools > Site Health > Info. Next, you can click on the Server tab and look for the PHP memory limit entry.

      A website with a high PHP memory size.

      Within the Server tab, you can also check other information such as your PHP version and the PHP time limit. The latter variable, which is in seconds, defines how long PHP scripts have to execute before they time out.

      For now, let’s focus on the PHP memory limit. As you can see, the above example has quite a high limit, which means that the website is unlikely to run into a WordPress Memory Exhausted error.

      If your site has a low memory limit (<64 MB), it’s in your best interests to increase it. There are a couple of ways you can do so.

      Take Your WordPress Website to the Next Level

      Whether you need help navigating your web hosting control panel, fixing an error, or finding the right plugin, we can help! Subscribe to our monthly digest so you never miss an article.

      How to Resolve the WordPress Memory Limit Error (2 Methods)

      As far as WordPress errors go, this one has a clear-cut cause and solution. You’re not allocating enough memory for your PHP installation, so you need to increase that number. In this section, we’ll go over two methods you can use: one manual technique and one that requires your wallet.

      1. Increase the PHP Memory Allocated to Your Website Manually

      WordPress enables you to declare your allowed memory size manually by modifying one of two files: .htaccess and wp-config.php. However, changing your WordPress installation’s .htaccess file can lead to site-wide errors since that file governs how it interacts with your server.

      Increasing your PHP memory limit through wp-config.php is, in most cases, the safest option, and it’s remarkably easy to do. All you need is a Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP) client such as FileZilla that you can use to connect to your website.

      Once you access your website via SFTP, open the WordPress root folder and look for the wp-config.php file within it.

      A WordPress wp-config.php file.

      Open that file using a text editor, and you should see something like this:

      Editing a wp-config.php file.

      To increase your PHP memory limit, you can simply add a single line of code anywhere after the <?php tag and before the part of the file that reads “/* That’s all, stop editing! Happy blogging. */”.

      This is the line of code to add:

      define( 'WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', 'XXXM' );

      You’ll need to replace the “XXX” variable within that line with the amount of memory you want to allocate to PHP. As we mentioned before, the absolute minimum you should settle for is 64 MB.

      However, you can also double the number to play it safe or increase it even further. For example, if you set a PHP memory limit of 256 MB, it would look like this:

      define( 'WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', ‘256M’);

      Once you’re set on a number, save the changes to wp-config.php and close the editor. Now return to your WordPress dashboard and navigate to Tools > Site Health > Info > Server to see if the changes went through.

      In some cases, declaring your PHP memory limit manually won’t work because you don’t have the necessary permissions to change that value. If you can’t adjust your WordPress memory size manually, that leaves you with one other option.

      2. Upgrade Your Website’s Hosting Plan

      Typically, if you use a decent WordPress hosting provider, you won’t need to worry about increasing your PHP memory limit. One caveat is that if you’re using shared hosting, you’ll likely face limited resources. So if you’re encountering this error, it might be time to upgrade to a better hosting plan.

      Upgrading your hosting package will usually result in an increase in available PHP memory. That means you’re much less likely to run into a WordPress memory limit error. The only limiting factor is your budget.

      If you can’t upgrade hosting plans right now, it might be worth contacting your provider’s support team and seeing if they can increase your PHP memory limit on their end. If they can’t, it might be time to switch to a better WordPress host that offers high PHP memory limits on affordable plans.

      Skip the Stress

      Avoid troubleshooting when you sign up for DreamPress. Our friendly WordPress experts are available 24/7 to help solve website problems — big or small.

      Want More WordPress Error Tips?

      Once you increase PHP memory on your WordPress website, we can help tackle other issues. We’ve put together several tutorials to help you troubleshoot every error message:

      Want more information on WordPress site management? Check out our WordPress Tutorials, a collection of guides designed to help you navigate the WordPress dashboard like an expert.

      Increasing PHP Memory Limit

      Running into a PHP fatal error can be worrying, but it’s not necessarily a cause for concern. Learning how to increase your PHP memory limit is relatively simple if you don’t mind using an SFTP client and adding a single line of code to one of WordPress’ core files.

      The alternative is to upgrade your hosting plan or opt for a better provider. Most WordPress-friendly hosting options offer high limits by default, so you’ll never run into a PHP memory exhausted error ever again.

      If you’re ready to use a web host optimized for WordPress websites, check out our DreamPress hosting packages! We offer optimized WordPress setups, so you spend less time troubleshooting errors and more time working on your website.



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      How to Fix the Sidebar Below Content Error in WordPress (In 3 Steps)


      Perfecting your WordPress website’s layout can be a lot of work, but it’s also essential for User Experience (UX), engagement, and conversions. Therefore, it can be frustrating when a seemingly random error causes a disruption to your site’s display — such as your sidebar suddenly appearing below the content rather than to the side.

      While there are a few potential causes, it primarily comes down to issues with the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) or Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Fortunately, the issues are relatively easy to fix, so you can quickly get your site back in tip-top shape.

      In this article, we’ll walk through the common causes of this error, then show you how to resolve it in three simple steps. Let’s get started!

      Common Causes of the Sidebar Dropping Below the Content in WordPress

      Sidebars in WordPress are content areas meant to be displayed either to the left or right of the page’s main segment (or sometimes both). They often contain widgets, sign-up forms, links to related posts, or similar content that you’d want to include across your site.

      Due to various bugs or errors, your sidebars may sometimes appear at the bottom of the page, rather than to the left or right. Needless to say, this can easily ruin a well-designed website.

      The primary cause of this behavior is problems with either the HTML or CSS on your site. It is usually a result of direct changes you’ve made to your site’s code, such as a theme or plugin file.

      For example, perhaps there is an extra or undisclosed <div> tag on the page. The problem could even be attributed to incorrect width and floating settings in your CSS. Fortunately, fixing this error is easy enough.

      Skip the Stress

      Avoid troubleshooting when you sign up for DreamPress. Our friendly WordPress experts are available 24/7 to help solve website problems — big or small.

      How to Fix the WordPress Sidebar Below Content Error (In 3 Steps)

      Now that you know the potential causes of this perplexing error, it’s time to correct it. We recommend running through the following three steps in order, moving on to the next only if the previous one didn’t work. Before getting started, remember to make a backup of your site just in case.

      Step 1: Undo Your Most Recent Changes

      The first step is also the simplest. If your sidebar moved after making a change to your site — whether that’s installing a new plugin, adding custom code, or anything else — simply undo it. Reversing the action both gets your layout back to its original format and helps isolate the cause of the issue.

      So you can start by reversing the change and refreshing your site to see if the sidebar is back in its proper place. If so, you can then look for potential issues with whatever changes you were attempting to make. For example, if you installed a new plugin, check for alternatives. If you altered or added to your site’s code, look for any typos or syntax errors.

      Step 2: Fix Unclosed <div> Tags or Remove Extra <div> Tags

      Often, an unclosed or extra <div> tag in your site’s code is the cause of the WordPress sidebar error. These HTML tags define the boundaries of sections on your website. If they’re incorrectly placed, browsers won’t render the site properly (hence the wandering sidebar).

      Here’s an example of a correctly-formatted page:

      Correctly formatted <div> tags on a page.

      Below is the same page with an unclosed <div> tag:

      Incorrect <div> tags causing elements to appear in the wrong place.

      You can see that what should be the closing <div> tag is missing the forward slash. As a result, the browser doesn’t know that it’s meant to be closed, and the content that should be outside the element is now inside.

      To fix this, comb through any template files you’ve modified and look for missing or extra tags. Generally, these errors can be found in the “template parts” files of your WordPress theme. To get there, head to your WordPress dashboard and navigate to Appearance > Theme Editor.

      The WordPress Theme Editor.

      Choose the correct theme from the drop-down menu at the top, and then locate the template parts section in the sidebar.

      Template parts in the WordPress Theme Editor.

      The templates that generate pages and posts are usually under the content section. Find the one you need from the list, check it, and make any corrections. Then you can click on Update File to save your changes.

      If you know which file you edited, you can jump straight there. Otherwise, you’ll need to check them all for inconsistencies.

      Step 3: Correct CSS Issues

      Another frequent cause of this error is found in your site’s CSS. The WordPress Customizer’s Additional CSS section enables you to add custom CSS to your site.

      The WordPress Customizer Additional CSS section.

      If you’ve used this feature or edited the CSS through other means, you may have formatted the code incorrectly. In the case of moving sidebars, the most common culprit is the “width” property.

      You should double-check that the sum of the widths of the Content and Sidebar elements doesn’t exceed the width of the Wrap element. If it does, the smaller element will be pushed down in order to fit.

      Tools to Make Troubleshooting Sidebar Issues Easier

      You can also troubleshoot the issue yourself without using code. There are several online tools online that can validate your code and check it for errors.

      You can use the W3C Markup Validation Service to check HTML code. The W3C CSS Validation Service is the CSS counterpart. Online Web Check is also an excellent tool that works for both HTML and CSS.

      These services are also fantastic if you just want a second set of eyes on your code, regardless of skill level. A quick double-check never hurt anyone!

      You could also take fixing WordPress errors off your to-do list with our DreamCare service. Our team of experts handle everything on the backend of your site to make sure it’s safe, secure, and always up.

      Additional WordPress Resources

      Say goodbye to broken links and error messages! We’ve put together several guides to help you troubleshoot every kind of WordPress problem:

      If you’re looking for more WordPress tips and hacks, check out our WordPress Tutorials, a collection of guides that’ll help you navigate the WordPress admin area like a pro.

      Take Your WordPress Site to the Next Level

      Whether you need help choosing the right WordPress plugin, creating a child theme, or writing your first blog post, we can help! Subscribe to our monthly digest so you never miss an article.

      Solving the Sidebar Error

      If you’ve spent time building a beautiful WordPress website, you likely don’t want anything to take away from it — least of all sudden errors. Fortunately, if the problem is that your sidebars are appearing below your content, the fix is relatively simple!

      To correct the sidebar appearing below content error, you can follow these three steps:

      1. Undo any changes you made to your site just prior to the error appearing.
      2. Check for and fix unclosed or extra <div> tags in your code.
      3. Verify that your site’s CSS is correct.

      If you’d rather spend your time working on your business instead of troubleshooting your website, consider switching to DreamPress. With our managed WordPress hosting plans, we take care of the problems for you, so you can stay focused on what really matters.



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