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      Finding the Right DigitalOcean Virtual Machine Type For Your Business


      Video

      About the Talk

      See how DigitalOcean’s simple, flexible, and reliable virtual machines (VMs) — called Droplets — can scale with you as your business grows. From a robust compute platform for production business applications, to customizable and cost-effective Droplets for personal passion projects, there is a right-shaped VM for you to scale vertically or horizontally.

      Resources

      Slides

      Droplets are Linux-based virtual machines (VMs) that run on top of virtualized hardware. Each Droplet you create is a new server you can use, either standalone or as part of a larger, cloud-based infrastructure. [Docs]

      Choosing the Right Droplet Plan

      Presenter

      Harsh Banwait leads Product Management for Droplets and compute infrastructure at DigitalOcean. Harsh has a background in building both software and hardware products and is passionate about creating easy-to-use and lovable experiences.



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      Finding the Right DigitalOcean Virtual Machine Type for Your Business


      Video

      About the Talk

      As your business grows and software needs change, it’s important to reevaluate your tech stack to meet your current goals.

      This session explores the tradeoffs between DigitalOcean’s deployment platforms: Droplets, DOKS, and App Platform. We’ll walk through choosing the right platform for your business with common use case examples, and how to know when you should consider migrating to another solution.

      Presenter

      Adam Wolfe Gordon is a software engineer at DigitalOcean, where he currently serves as the tech lead for managed Kubernetes and container registry. He previously worked on block storage at DigitalOcean and EMC. Adam is a regular conference speaker and a frequent attendee of and presenter at local meetups in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. He likes building and debugging microservices, observability, and occasional forays into lower-level software.

      Resources

      Slides



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      What is a Virtual Machine?


      A virtual machine, also commonly referred to as VM, is a guest system running on top of a virtualization software or hypervisor. VirtualBox, VMWare, and QEMU are examples of popular tools that are able to emulate network, disk, and other hardware resources to build virtualized environments that behave as physical computers. These environments are isolated from each other and from the host where the virtualization software is installed, each running distinct operating systems.

      Virtual machines are largely used in cloud computing to distribute hardware resources among smaller-sized, virtual private servers. When compared to containers, virtual machines are more resource-intensive, but that allows them to emulate entire servers and desktops seamlessly.

      Another important use case for virtual machines is within the context of development environments. With virtual machines, developers are able to work on their applications in isolated, pre-configured environments that are independent of their base operating system.



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