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      Media

      Social Media Marketing for Organic Engagement & Brand Trust


      Video

      About the Talk

      It’s no secret that social media for businesses has become a pay-to-play landscape. Yet, no amount of paid ads can generate the push authenticity can. Regardless of your budget, there is a way to authentically engage and interact with your customers via social media platforms. Explore organic strategies that help you speak more authentically to your followers while building trust in your brand.

      What You’ll Learn

      • Which metrics really matter (Say goodbye to vanity metrics!)
      • Engagement optimization tactics
      • Rooting intentions in values

      Resources

      Slides

      About the Presenter

      Kirby is the Senior Social Media Manager at DigitalOcean. She was also the company Culture Champion award winner in 2020. Her work is driven by making a positive impact on others and doing everything with love at our core.



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      How to Create a Media Kit for Your Website (5 Key Tips)


      You’ve built a great website and spent hours crafting content that’s laser-focused on your target audience. Your traffic is great, the site design is impeccable, and the search engine optimization? You’re hitting every keyword, baby.

      But here’s the unpleasant truth: you can be doing all those things right and still not get the interest from advertisers and media outlets that you want to grow your business.

      You may be wondering what you can do to turn things around and deliver a comprehensive message to prospects about your services.

      Adding your business’ key information to your website can be a way to maintain your brand standards while bringing in new advertisers and collaborators. Collecting these details into a “media kit” can help you provide a convenient place for people to find and use them as needed.

      In this article, we’ll take a look at how media kits coordinate with your other content and why you might want to add one to your site. Along the way, we’ll share some stellar media kit examples. We’ll also go over how to create your own media kit in five easy steps.

      Whether you’re a blogger, influencer, or entrepreneur, creating a media kit for your website is a must. Let’s get you some press coverage!

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      What a Media Kit Typically Provides

      The terms “press kit” and “media kit” are often used interchangeably. A media kit, however, is more specifically geared towards bringing in advertisers or potential clients.

      Arguably, a public relations-driven press kit can also bring in advertisers. For this article, we’re going to use the term “media kit,” however, and focus on how it can help you monetize your website, bring in collaborators, and appeal to advertisers.

      A comprehensive media kit generally includes the following:

      • An introduction. You can use this as an opportunity to present a very targeted message about your business. Alternatively, you can produce an approved bio for anyone to use.
      • Site statistics. There’s no need to be humble here — it’s smart to put your best numbers out in front. For example, you can let everyone know what a great opportunity your site presents due to the volume of traffic it receives.
      • Advertising opportunities. You can use your media kit to spell out precisely what kind of advertising you have available on your site. Your media kit is a good place to outline what you can’t accommodate as well.
      • Audience data. The demographics of your site’s audience might not be right for every advertiser or collaborator. Supplying that information in your media kit can help eliminate any confusion.

      Let’s look at an online-only media outlet as an example. The popular website, BuzzFeed, has a global audience of over 650 million. It showcases its media kit information in a clean and scrollable format for potential advertisers. The kit clearly displays the most critical information and allows for opportunities to click through and learn more.

      Alternatively, Catherine Summers is a style blogger with a media kit that ticks off all the best practices boxes. Summers immediately jumps in and addresses why anyone would want to work with her and then lays out all the options.

      Catherine Summers’ media kit page featuring her headshot.

      These examples showcase a wide variety of different approaches you might consider for your own media kit.

      Why You Might Want to Consider Adding a Media Kit to Your Website

      As we mentioned before, media kits are prime real estate for showcasing the best of what you have to offer. Plus, you can plainly state how interested advertisers or other potential clients can work with you.

      That said, there are are two main audiences to think about when deciding whether you should create a media kit for your website. They include:

      • Advertisers. If you are hoping to bring in revenue by offering up space on your website, you’ll want to consider crafting your media kit with an appeal to potential advertisers. Highlighting your audience demographics and the number of views they might get on your site are important metrics to consider.
      • Clients. If your primary goal is to bring in new clients or fill out your speaking engagement calendar, there might be other aspects to highlight in your kit as well. For instance, showcasing previous high-profile engagements can heighten your appeal to potential clients.

      Understanding the primary goal of creating a media kit for your website can help you prioritize your content and focus your efforts. Of course, your media kit might also have a combination of advertiser and client appeal. As we saw in the examples above, being comprehensive with your media kit is definitely a valid approach.

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      How to Create a Media Kit for Your Website (5 Key Tips)

      Now that you have some idea of what a media kit might include, let’s discuss how you can start building your own. In the following sections, we’ll cover five essential steps that will get you on the path to building an attention-grabbing kit.

      1. Establish Your Brand

      When it comes to marketing, brand and brand strategy are vital. Your media kit is one opportunity to really solidify your brand and make sure it’s represented correctly. There are several ways you can help to establish your brand with your media kit.

      Providing downloadable documents, press releases, images, and logos or graphics is one approach. Offering these can help encourage site visitors to use your products and establish a friendly atmosphere. Visitors will know it’s OK to use the materials, and you control their quality.

      A downloadable biography and images in Brene Brown’s media kit.

      Another element you might consider including in your media kit is a style guide. This guide may take some investment of time to create but can pay off in the long run. A style guide makes it very clear how your brand can and should be used both on- and offline.

      2. Provide Relevant Statistics

      We mentioned earlier that one element of a media kit to consider is statistics about your site and business. Depending on your level of experience with tracking analytics, this might seem challenging at first.

      If you’re using a managed web host for your website, you might want to see if it provides easily-accessible statistics. For example, here at DreamHost, all of our hosting accounts include user statistics functionality. This can help you track visitor numbers, traffic to your domain, and even referring URLs.

      BuzzFeed’s advertiser information page featuring audience statistics.

      To maximize the benefit of providing your stats, you’ll want to keep in mind who they’re relevant to. In the case of media kits, you’re not really providing these numbers for your readers, but rather for potential advertisers or clients. Therefore, you’ll want to focus on the figures that illustrate the benefits of working with you and your audience. Don’t forget to include follower demographics and engagement data from your social media platforms too!

      3. Describe How to Collaborate With You

      Your media kit is also a place where you can specifically outline what opportunities you are looking for when it comes to collaboration, such as:

      • Affiliate Marketing Opportunities
      • Book Deal
      • Event Appearances
      • Giveaways
      • Guest Posting
      • Podcast Sponsorships
      • Product Reviews
      • Site Ads
      • Social Media Promotions
      • Sponsored Blog Posts

      Being specific can help increase the number of quality leads you get. For example, if you are primarily looking for guest posting or social media opportunities, outline the specifics in your media kit.

      The LadyBossBlogger website has an excellent example of how to present your collaboration suggestions and opportunities transparently.

      LadyBossBlogger’s media kit page featuring collaboration information

      Alternatively, you can create forms that allow potential collaborators to give information and outline their inquiries. You’ll also want to consider whether you want to list your prices upfront or encourage prospects to contact you for more details.

      4. Share What Others Have to Say About You

      Testimonials are used in marketing all the time and for good reason. Your media kit can leverage the power of these as well. As a form of word-of-mouth marketing, collecting strong testimonials (or just creating a list of past media coverage) is often a worthwhile investment of time.

      Whether you’re citing past media mentions from publications or sharing sound bites from social media followers, It’s always advisable to note in your media kit exactly where your testimonials are coming from. You can help build trust through transparency in this way.

      One useful example to check out is cookbook author Ren Behan’s press site. There, she displays comments and testimonials in a variety of ways.

      Testimonials from Ren Behan’s media kit page.

      There are several methods for collecting testimonials. You can use online reviews and LinkedIn recommendations, for example. However you decide to obtain them, you’ll want to make sure it is evident in your media kit whether it is acceptable for others (such as reporters) to use them.

      5. Provide Your Contact Information

      It may seem like a simple thing, but providing your contact information is extremely vital. In fact, the contact page is often the most-visited page on any website. You can link to this page in your media kit or simply include contact information and methods within it.

      Either way, providing multiple contact options is always a smart approach. Some web users prefer forms, while others will just want to know what your email address is. One good example of combining both methods comes from (not surprisingly) a UX designer’s website.

      The contact information on Ekkrit Design’s website.

      The simple approach here makes critical information very clear and gives the visitor options. Your contact information is probably not where you want to implement an online scavenger hunt. Also, it’s essential to always keep this information up-to-date, with all links and forms functioning optimally.

      Essential Tools and Resources for Building Your Media Kit

      Now that you’re armed with some great ideas for your media kit, you might be wondering how to create yours. You can do this entirely from scratch, of course. However, there are also quite a few free and premium resources that can make the process easier.

      These include:

      • Canva. This is an online design tool with beautiful pre-made templates and graphic elements. You can get a free template with limited access or pay to get a variety of upgrades at reasonable prices.
      • Creative Market. An online exchange for creative work, Creative Market is like Etsy for marketing materials. You can commission a custom font, or browse other original work to find the perfect fit for your brand.
      • WordPress. There are many options out there for building websites, but at DreamHost, we’re partial to WordPress. As a free, open-source tool, it offers immense flexibility. Plus, you’ll find many useful plugins for creating portfolios, displaying contact information, and developing contact forms.

      Ultimately, how you create your media kit is less important than what it includes. So you should feel free to use whatever tools you’re most comfortable with and focus on ensuring that your kit is comprehensive, easy to understand, and user-friendly.

      Get Those Media Contacts

      Bloggers, influencers, small business owners — regardless of your focus, you want to solidify your brand, bring in more work, and attract advertisers. For all those goals, a media kit is the key.

      Now that we’ve covered the ins and outs of media kits and shared some industry-standard examples, you should be ready to launch your electronic press kit.

      Creating a wow-inducing media kit can take time. Here at DreamHost, we want you to be able to focus on the task at hand, and not get sidetracked by website maintenance and troubleshooting. That’s why we offer complete hosting solutions with reliable support, so you can focus on growing your business!



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      Install Plex Media Server on Ubuntu 18.04 Using Salt Masterless


      Updated by Linode Contributed by Linode

      Plex is a media server that allows you to stream video and audio content that you own to many different types of devices. In this guide you will learn how to use a masterless Salt minion to set up a Plex server, attach and use a Block Storage Volume, and how to connect to your media server to stream content to your devices.

      Before You Begin

      1. Familiarize yourself with our Getting Started guide and complete the steps for setting your Linode’s hostname and timezone.

      2. Follow the steps in the How to Secure Your Server guide.

      3. Update your system:

        sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
        
      4. You will need to create a Block Storage Volume and attach it to your Linode. You will format and mount the drive as part of this guide. This volume will be used to store your media, so you should pick a size that’s appropriate for your media collection, though you can resize the volume later if you need more storage. For more on Block Storage, see our How to Use Block Storage guide.

      5. Plex requires an account to use their service. Visit the Plex website to sign up for an account if you do not already have one.

      Note

      The steps in this guide require root privileges. Be sure to run the steps below with the sudo prefix. For more information on privileges, see our Users and Groups guide.

      Prepare the Salt Minion

      1. On your Linode, create the /srv/salt and /srv/pillar directories. These are where the Salt state files and Pillar files will be housed.

        mkdir /srv/salt && mkdir /srv/pillar
        
      2. Install salt-minion via the Salt bootstrap script:

        curl -L https://bootstrap.saltstack.com -o bootstrap_salt.sh
        sudo sh bootstrap_salt.sh
        
      3. The Salt minion will use the official Plex Salt Formula, which is hosted on the SaltStack GitHub repository. In order to use a Salt formula hosted on an external repository, you will need GitPython installed. Install GitPython:

        sudo apt-get install python-git
        

      Modify the Salt Minion Configuration

      1. Because the Salt minion is running in masterless mode, you will need to modify the minion configuration file (/etc/salt/minion) to instruct Salt to look for state files locally. Open the minion configuration file in a text editor, uncomment the line #file_client: remote, and set it to local:

        /etc/salt/minion
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        ...
        
        # Set the file client. The client defaults to looking on the master server for
        # files, but can be directed to look at the local file directory setting
        # defined below by setting it to "local". Setting a local file_client runs the
        # minion in masterless mode.
        file_client: local
        
        ...
      2. There are some configuration values that do not normally exist in /etc/salt/minion which you will need to add in order to run your minion in masterless mode. Copy the following lines into the end of /etc/salt/minion:

        /etc/salt/minion
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        ...
        
        fileserver_backend:
          - roots
          - gitfs
        
        gitfs_remotes:
          - https://github.com/saltstack-formulas/plex-formula.git
        
        gitfs_provider: gitpython

        The fileserver_backend block instructs the Salt minion to look for Salt configuration files in two places. First, it tells Salt to look for Salt state files in our minion’s roots backend (/srv/salt). Secondly, it instructs Salt to use the Git Fileserver (gitfs) to look for Salt configuration files in any Git remote repositories that have been named in the gitfs_remotes section. The address for the Plex Salt formula’s Git repository is included in the gitfs_remotes section.

        Note

        It is best practice to create a fork of the Plex formula’s Git repository on GitHub and to add your fork’s Git repository address in the gitfs_remotes section. This will ensure that any further changes to the upstream Plex formula which might break your current configuration can be reviewed and handled accordingly, before applying them.

        Lastly, GitPython is specified as the gitfs_provider.

      Create the Salt State Tree

      1. Create a Salt state top file at /srv/salt/top.sls and copy in the following configuration. This file tells Salt to look for state files in the plex folder of the Plex formula’s Git repository, and for a state files named disk.sls and directory.sls, which you will create in the next steps.

        /srv/salt/top.sls
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        base:
          '*':
            - plex
            - disk
            - directory
      2. Create the disk.sls file in /srv/salt:

        /srv/salt/disk.sls
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        disk.format:
          module.run:
            - device: /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-0Linode_Volume_{{ pillar['volume_name'] }}
            - fs_type: ext4
        
        /mnt/plex:
          mount.mounted:
            - device: /dev/disk/by-id/scsi-0Linode_Volume_{{ pillar['volume_name'] }}
            - fstype: ext4
            - mkmnt: True
            - persist: True

        This file instructs Salt to prepare your Block Storage Volume for use with Plex. It first formats your Block Storage Volume with the ext4 filesystem type by using the disk.format Salt module, which can be run in a state file using module.run. Then disk.sls instructs Salt to mount your volume at /mnt/plex, creating the mount target if it does not already exist with mkmnt, and persisting the mount to /etc/fstab so that the volume is always mounted at boot.

      3. Create the directory.sls file in /srv/salt:

        /srv/salt/directory.sls
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        /mnt/plex/plex-media:
          file.directory:
            - require:
              - mount: /mnt/plex
            - user: username
            - group: plex
        
        /mnt/plex/plex-media/movies:
          file.directory:
            - require:
              - mount: /mnt/plex
            - user: username
            - group: plex
        
        /mnt/plex/plex-media/television:
          file.directory:
            - require:
              - mount: /mnt/plex
            - user: username
            - group: plex

        The directories that are created during this step are for organizational purposes, and will house your media. Make sure you replace username with the name of the limited user account you created when following the How to Secure Your Server guide. The location of the directories is the volume you mounted in the previous step. If you wish to add more directories, perhaps one for your music media, you can do so here, just be sure to include the - require block, as this prevents Salt from trying to create the directory before the Block Storage Volume has been mounted.

      4. Go to the Plex Media Server download page and note the most recent version of their Linux distribution. At the time of writing, the most recent version is 1.13.9.5456-ecd600442. Create the plex.sls Pillar file in /srv/pillar and change the Plex version number and the name of your Block Storage Volume as necessary:

        /srv/pillar/plex.sls
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        plex:
          version: 1.13.9.5456-ecd600442
        volume_name: plex
      5. Create the Salt Pillar top file in /srv/pillar. This file will instruct Salt to look for the plex.sls Pillar file you created in the previous step.

        /srv/pillar/top.sls
      6. Apply your Salt state locally using salt-call:

        salt-call --local state.apply
        

        You should see a list of the changes Salt applied to your system. You have successfully installed Plex using Salt.

      Set Up Plex

      Initial Configuration

      1. You’ll need to create an SSH tunnel to your Linode to connect to Plex’s web UI. On your local computer, run the following command, replacing <your_ip_address> with your Plex server’s IP address.:

        ssh username@<your_ip_address> -L 8888:localhost:32400
        
      2. In a browser, navigate to http://localhost:8888/web/.

      3. Sign in with your Plex username and password.

      4. Name your media server. This example uses the name linode-plex. Be sure to check the box that reads Allow me to access my media outside my home and then click Next.

        Name your media server

      Organize Your Media

      1. Click on the Add Library button:

        Click on Add Media

      2. Select Movies and click Next:

        Select Movies and click next

      3. Click Browse for Media Folder and select the appropriate folder at /mnt/plex/plex-media/movies. Then click Add:

        Select the appropriate folder

      4. Repeat the process to add your ‘Television’ folder.

      5. When you are done adding your libraries, click Add Library.

      6. To continue the configuration process, click Next.

      7. Click on Get Plex Apps to download the appropriate Plex client for your device. Then click Done.

        Download the appropriate client for your device

      8. In the future you can add more libraries by hovering over the menu and clicking the plus sign (+) next to LIBRARIES.

        Add more libraries

      DLNA is a protocol that incorporates Universal Plug and Play (or UPnP) standards for digital media sharing across devices. If you do not wish to make use of it, it’s recommended that you disable this feature, as it is openly connectable on port 1900. From the Plex web interface, click the wrench icon in the upper right corner, and navigate to the DLNA section under SETTINGS. Uncheck Enable the DLNA server, and click Save Changes:

      Disable DLNA

      Connect to Your Plex Server

      1. Visit the Plex Apps download page or the app store on your device to download Plex Media Player if you have not already done so.

      2. Open your Plex app. The example provided here will use the Plex Media Player for macOS.

      3. Sign in to Plex.

      4. On the left there’s a dropdown menu where you can select your server by the name you chose. Select your server.

        Connect to your Plex Server

      5. You are now able to stream your content with Plex.

        Plex's macOS App

      1. You can use SCP to transfer media to your server from your local computer. Replace your username and 123.456.7.8 with the IP address of your Linode.

        scp example_video.mp4 username@123.456.7.8:/mnt/plex/plex-media/movies
        
      2. Once you’ve transferred files to your Plex media server, you may need to scan for new files before they show up in your Library. Click on the ellipsis next to a Library and select Scan Library Files.

        Scan your Library for new files

      More Information

      You may wish to consult the following resources for additional information on this topic. While these are provided in the hope that they will be useful, please note that we cannot vouch for the accuracy or timeliness of externally hosted materials.

      Find answers, ask questions, and help others.

      This guide is published under a CC BY-ND 4.0 license.



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