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      Opacity

      How to Change a CSS Background Image’s Opacity


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      With CSS and CSS3 you can do a lot of things, but setting an opacity on a CSS background is not one of them. However, if you get creative, there are a ton of creative work-arounds you to make it seem like you’re changing the CSS background image’s opacity. Both of the following methods have excellent browser support down to Internet Explorer 8.

      Method 1: Use absolute positioning and an image

      This method is exactly like it sounds. You simply use absolute positioning on an a normal img tag and make it seem like you used the CSS background-image property. All you have to do is put the image inside of a position: relative; container. Here’s what the HTML markup generally looks like:

      <div class="demo_wrap">
        <h1>Hello World!</h1>
        <img src="https://www.xpresservers.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/How-to-Change-a-CSS-Background-Images-Opacity.png">
      </div>
      

      And here’s what your CSS will look like:

      .demo_wrap {
          position: relative;
          overflow: hidden;
          padding: 16px;
          border: 1px dashed green;
      }
      .demo_wrap h1 {
          padding: 100px;
          position: relative;
          z-index: 2;
      }
      .demo_wrap img {
          position: absolute;
          left: 0;
          top: 0;
          width: 100%;
          height: auto;
          opacity: 0.6;
      }
      

      The trick here is to absolutely position the img and stretch it so it fills the entire parent container. And to relatively position everything else so that you can set a z-index that pulls it above the img.

      Here’s a live demo:

      Method 2: Using CSS Pseudo-Elements

      This method is seems simple once you see it, and is definitely my preferred method of doing this. Using CSS pseudo-elements of either :before or :after, you a div with a background image and set an opacity on it. Here’s what your HTML markup would roughly look like:

      <div class="demo_wrap">
        <h1>Hello World!</h1>
      </div>
      

      And here’s what the CSS looks like:

         .demo_wrap {
          position: relative;
          background: #5C97FF;
          overflow: hidden;
      }
      .demo_wrap h1 {
          padding: 50px;
          position: relative;
          z-index: 2;
      }
      /* You could use :after - it doesn't really matter */
      .demo_wrap:before {
          content: ' ';
          display: block;
          position: absolute;
          left: 0;
          top: 0;
          width: 100%;
          height: 100%;
          z-index: 1;
          opacity: 0.6;
          background-image: url('https://www.xpresservers.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/How-to-Change-a-CSS-Background-Images-Opacity.png');
          background-repeat: no-repeat;
          background-position: 50% 0;
          background-size: cover;
      }
      

      Here again we must move the z-index of content (in this cas the <h1>) above the background pseudoelement, and we must explicitly define the position: absolute; and z-index: 1 on the :before pseudoelement.

      The rest of the attributes on the pseudoelement exist to position it to overlap 100% of the parent, and also make use of a clever new CSS property: background-size: cover which sizes the background to cover the element without changing proportions.
      Here’s a nice little demo of this method:



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