One place for hosting & domains

      Set Up a Reverse Proxy in an LXD Container to Host Multiple Websites


      Updated by Linode Contributed by Simos Xenitellis

      Introduction

      LXD (pronounced “Lex-Dee”) is a system container manager build on top of Linux Containers (LXC) supported by Canonical. The goal of LXD is to provide an experience similar to a virtual machine but through containerization rather than hardware virtualization. Compared to Docker for delivering applications, LXD offers nearly full operating-system functionality with additional features such as snapshots, live migrations, and storage management.

      A reverse proxy is a server that sits between internal applications and external clients, forwarding client requests to the appropriate server. While many common applications, such as Node.js, are able to function as servers on their own, they may lack a number of advanced load balancing, security, and acceleration features.

      This guide explains the creation of a reverse proxy in an LXD container in order to host multiple websites, each in their own additional containers. You will utilize NGINX and Apache web servers, while also relying on NGINX as a reverse proxy.

      Please refer to the following diagram to understand the reverse proxy created in this guide.

      Diagram of LXD reverse proxy and web servers

      In this guide you will:

      Note

      For simplicity, the term container is used throughout this guide to describe the LXD system containers.

      Before You Begin

      1. Complete A Beginner’s Guide to LXD: Setting Up an Apache Web Server In a Container. The guide instructs you to create a container called web with the Apache web server for testing purposes. Remove this container by running the following commands.

        lxc stop web
        lxc delete web
        

        Note

      2. This guide will use the hostnames apache1.example.com and nginx1.example.com for the two example websites. Replace these names with hostnames you own and setup their DNS entries to point them to the IP address of the server you created. For help with DNS see our DNS Manager Guide.

      Creating the Containers

      1. Create two containers called apache1 and nginx1, one with the Apache web server and another with the NGINX web server, respectively. For any additional websites, you may create new containers with your chosen web server software.

        lxc launch ubuntu:18.04 apache1
        lxc launch ubuntu:18.04 nginx1
        
      2. Create the proxy container for the reverse proxy.

        lxc launch ubuntu:18.04 proxy
        
      3. List the containers with the list command.

        lxc list
        
      4. The output will look similar to the following.

          
        +---------+---------+---------------------+-----------------------------------------------+------------+-----------+
        |  NAME   |  STATE  |        IPV4         |                     IPV6                      |    TYPE    | SNAPSHOTS |
        +---------+---------+---------------------+-----------------------------------------------+------------+-----------+
        | apache1 | RUNNING | 10.10.10.204 (eth0) | fd42:67a4:b462:6ae2:216:3eff:fe01:1a4e (eth0) | PERSISTENT |           |
        +---------+---------+---------------------+-----------------------------------------------+------------+-----------+
        | nginx1  | RUNNING | 10.10.10.251 (eth0) | fd42:67a4:b462:6ae2:216:3eff:febd:67e3 (eth0) | PERSISTENT |           |
        +---------+---------+---------------------+-----------------------------------------------+------------+-----------+
        | proxy   | RUNNING | 10.10.10.28 (eth0)  | fd42:67a4:b462:6ae2:216:3eff:fe00:252e (eth0) | PERSISTENT |           |
        +---------+---------+---------------------+-----------------------------------------------+------------+-----------+
        
        

        There are three containers, all in the RUNNING state – each with their own private IP address. Take note of the IP addresses (both IPv4 and IPv6) for the container proxy. You will need them to configure the proxy container in a later section.

        Now that the containers have been created, the following steps will detail how to set up the web server software in the apache1 and nginx1 containers, and the proxy container so that the web servers are accessible from the internet.

      Configuring the Apache Web Server Container

      When using a reverse proxy in front of a web server, the web server does not know the IP addresses of visitors. The web server only sees the IP address of the reverse proxy. However, each web server has a way to identify the real remote IP address of a visitor. For Apache, this is performed with the Remote IP Apache module. For the module to work, the reverse proxy must be configured to pass the remote IP address’ information.

      1. Start a shell in the apache1 container.

        lxc exec apache1 -- sudo --user ubuntu --login
        
      2. Update the package list in the apache1 container.

        sudo apt update
        
      3. Install the package apache2 in the container.

        sudo apt install -y apache2
        
      4. Create the file /etc/apache2/conf-available/remoteip.conf.

        remoteip.conf
        1
        2
        
        RemoteIPHeader X-Real-IP
        RemoteIPTrustedProxy 10.10.10.28 fd42:67a4:b462:6ae2:216:3eff:fe00:252e

        You can use the nano text editor by running the command sudo nano /etc/apache2/conf-available/remoteip.conf. Note, these are the IP addresses of the proxy container shown earlier, for both IPv4 and IPv6. Replace these with the IPs from your lxc list output.

        Note

        Instead of specifying the IP addresses, you can also use the hostname proxy.lxd. However, the RemoteIP Apache module is peculiar when using the hostname and will use only one of the two IP addresses (either IPv4 or IPv6), which means the Apache web server will not know the real source IP address for some connections. By listing explicitly both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, you can be certain that RemoteIP will successfully accept the source IP information from all connections of the reverse proxy.

      5. Enable the new remoteip.conf configuration.

        sudo a2enconf remoteip
        
          
        Enabling conf remoteip.
        To activate the new configuration, you need to run:
        systemctl reload apache2
        
        
      6. Enable the remoteip Apache module.

        sudo a2enmod remoteip
        
          
        Enabling module remoteip.
        To activate the new configuration, you need to run:
        systemctl restart apache2
        
        
      7. Edit the default web page for Apache to make a reference that it runs inside a LXD container.

        sudo nano /var/www/html/index.html
        

        Change the line “It works!” (line number 224) to “It works inside a LXD container!” Save and exit.

      8. Restart the Apache web server.

        sudo systemctl reload apache2
        
      9. Exit back to the host.

        exit
        

      You have created and configured the Apache web server, but the server is not yet accessible from the Internet. It will become accessible after you configure the proxy container in a later section.

      Creating the NGINX Web Server Container

      Like Apache, NGINX does not know the IP addresses of visitors when using a reverse proxy in front of a web server. It only sees the IP address of the reverse proxy instead. Each NGINX web server software can identify the real remote IP address of a visitor with the Real IP module. For the module to work, the reverse proxy must be configured accordingly to pass the information regarding the remote IP addresses.

      1. Start a shell in the nginx1 container.

        lxc exec nginx1 -- sudo --user ubuntu --login
        
      2. Update the package list in the nginx1 container.

        sudo apt update
        
      3. Install NGINX in the container.

        sudo apt install -y nginx
        
      4. Create the file /etc/nginx/conf.d/real-ip.conf.

        real-ip.conf
        1
        2
        
        real_ip_header    X-Real-IP;
        set_real_ip_from  proxy.lxd;

        You can use the nano text editor by running the command sudo nano /etc/nginx/conf.d/real-ip.conf.

        Note

        You have specified the hostname of the reverse proxy, proxy.lxd. Each LXD container gets automatically a hostname, which is the name of the container plus the suffix .lxd. By specifying the set_real_ip_from field with proxy.lxd, you are instructing the NGINX web server to accept the real IP address information for each connection, as long as that connection originates from proxy.lxd. The real IP address information will be found in the HTTP header X-Real-IP in each connection.

      5. Edit the default web page for NGINX to make a reference that it runs inside a LXD container.

        sudo nano /var/www/html/index.nginx-debian.html
        

        Change the line “Welcome to nginx!” (line number 14) to “Welcome to nginx running in a LXD system container!”. Save and exit.

      6. Restart the NGINX web server.

        sudo systemctl reload nginx
        
      7. Exit back to the host.

        exit
        

      You have created and configured the NGINX web server, but the server is not accessible yet from the Internet. It will become accessible after you configure the proxy container in the next section.

      Setting up the Reverse Proxy

      In this section you will configure the container proxy. You will install NGINX and set it up as a reverse proxy, then add the appropriate LXD proxy device in order to expose both ports 80 and 443 to the internet.

      1. Add LXD proxy devices to redirect connections from the internet to ports 80 (HTTP) and 443 (HTTPS) on the server to the respective ports at the proxy container.

        lxc config device add proxy myport80 proxy listen=tcp:0.0.0.0:80 connect=tcp:127.0.0.1:80 proxy_protocol=true
        lxc config device add proxy myport443 proxy listen=tcp:0.0.0.0:443 connect=tcp:127.0.0.1:443 proxy_protocol=true
        
          
        Device myport80 added to proxy
        Device myport443 added to proxy
        
        

        The lxc config device add command takes as arguments:

        Argument Explanation
        proxy The name of the container.
        myport80 A name for this proxy device.
        proxy The type of the LXD device (LXD proxy device).
        listen=tcp:0.0.0.0:80 The proxy device will listen on the host (default) on port 80, protocol TCP, on all interfaces.
        connect=tcp:127.0.0.1:80 The proxy device will connect to the container on port 80, protocol TCP, on the loopback interface. In previous versions of LXD you could have specified localhost here. However, in LXD 3.13 or newer, you can only specify IP addresses.
        proxy_protocol=true Request to enable the PROXY protocol so that the reverse proxy will get the originating IP address from the proxy device.

        Note

        If you want to remove a proxy device, use lxc config device remove. If you want to remove the above device myport80, run the following command:

        lxc config device remove proxy myport80
        

        Where proxy is the name of the container, and myport80 is the name of the device.

      2. Start a shell in the proxy container.

        lxc exec proxy -- sudo --user ubuntu --login
        
      3. Update the package list.

        sudo apt update
        
      4. Install NGINX in the container.

        sudo apt install -y nginx
        
      5. Logout from the container.

        logout
        

      Direct Traffic to the Apache Web Server From the Reverse Proxy

      The reverse proxy container is running and the NGINX package has been installed. To work as a reverse proxy, add the appropriate website configuration so that NGINX can identify (with server_name below) the appropriate hostname, and then pass (with proxy_pass below) the connection to the appropriate LXD container.

      1. Start a shell in the proxy container.

        lxc exec proxy -- sudo --user ubuntu --login
        
      2. Create the file apache1.example.com in /etc/nginx/sites-available/ for the configuration of your first website.

        apache1.example.com
         1
         2
         3
         4
         5
         6
         7
         8
         9
        10
        11
        12
        13
        14
        15
        
        server {
                listen 80 proxy_protocol;
                listen [::]:80 proxy_protocol;
        
                server_name apache1.example.com;
        
                location / {
                        proxy_set_header Host $host;
                        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
                        proxy_pass http://apache1.lxd;
                }
        
                real_ip_header proxy_protocol;
                set_real_ip_from 127.0.0.1;
        }

        You can run sudo nano /etc/nginx/sites-available/apache1.example.com to open up a text editor and add the configuration. Note, in this case you only need to edit the server_name to be the hostname of the website.

      3. Enable the website.

        sudo ln -s /etc/nginx/sites-available/apache1.example.com /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/
        
      4. Restart the NGINX reverse proxy. By restarting the service, NGINX will read and apply the new site instructions just added to /etc/nginx/sites-enabled.

        sudo systemctl reload nginx
        
      5. Exit the proxy container and return back to the host.

        logout
        
      6. From your local computer, visit the URL of your website with your web browser. You should see the default Apache page:

        Web page of Apache server running in a container

        Note

        If you look at the Apache access.log file (default file /var/log/apache2/access.log), it will still show the private IP address of the proxy container instead of the real IP address. This issue is specific to the Apache web server and has to do with how the server prints the logs. Other software on the web server will be able to use the real IP. To fix this through the Apache logs, see the section Troubleshooting.

      Direct Traffic to the NGINX Web Server From the Reverse Proxy

      The reverse proxy container is running and the NGINX package has been installed. To work as a reverse proxy, you will add the appropriate website configuration so NGINX can identify (with server_name below) the appropriate hostname, and then pass (with proxy_pass below) the connection to the appropriate LXD container with the actual web server software.

      1. Start a shell in the proxy container.

        lxc exec proxy -- sudo --user ubuntu --login
        
      2. Create the file nginx1.example.com in /etc/nginx/sites-available/ for the configuration of your second website.

        nginx1.example.com
         1
         2
         3
         4
         5
         6
         7
         8
         9
        10
        11
        12
        13
        14
        15
        
        server {
                listen 80 proxy_protocol;
                listen [::]:80 proxy_protocol;
        
                server_name nginx1.example.com;
        
                location / {
                        proxy_set_header Host $host;
                        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
                        proxy_pass http://nginx1.lxd;
                }
        
                real_ip_header proxy_protocol;
                set_real_ip_from 127.0.0.1;
        }

        You can run sudo nano /etc/nginx/sites-available/nginx1.example.com to create the configuration. Note, you only need to edit the fields server_name to be the hostname of the website.

      3. Enable the website.

        sudo ln -s /etc/nginx/sites-available/nginx1.example.com /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/
        
      4. Restart the NGINX reverse proxy service.

        sudo systemctl reload nginx
        
      5. Exit the proxy container and return back to the host.

        logout
        
      6. From your local computer, visit the URL of your website with your web browser. You should see the following default NGINX page.

        Web page of the nginx server running in a container

      Adding Support for HTTPS with Let’s Encrypt

      1. Start a shell in the proxy container.

        lxc exec proxy -- sudo --user ubuntu --login
        
      2. Add the repository ppa:certbot/certbot by running the following command.

        sudo add-apt-repository ppa:certbot/certbot
        
      3. Output will look similar to the following.

          
              This is the PPA for packages prepared by Debian Let's Encrypt Team and backported for Ubuntu(s).
              More info: https://launchpad.net/~certbot/+archive/ubuntu/certbot
             Press [ENTER] to continue or Ctrl-c to cancel adding it.
        
             Get:1 http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu bionic-security InRelease [88.7 kB]
             ...
             Fetched 3360 kB in 2s (2018 kB/s)
             Reading package lists... Done
        
        
      4. Install the following two packages to a) support the creation of Let’s Encrypt certificates; and b) auto-configure the NGINX reverse proxy to use Let’s Encrypt certificates. The packages are pulled from the newly-created repository.

        sudo apt-get install certbot python-certbot-nginx
        

        Note

        This configures the reverse proxy to also act as a TLS Termination Proxy. Any HTTPS configuration is only found in the proxy container. By doing so, it is not necessary to perform any tasks inside the web server containers relating to certificates and Let’s Encrypt.

      5. Run certbot as root with the --nginx parameter in order to perform the auto-configuration of Let’s Encrypt for the first website. You will be asked to supply a valid email address for urgent renewal and security notices. You will then be asked to accept the Terms of Service and whether you would like to be contacted by the Electronic Frontier Foundation in the future. Next, you will provide the website for which you are activating HTTPS. Finally, you can choose to set up a facility that automatically redirects HTTP connections to HTTPS connections.

        sudo certbot --nginx
        
          
        Saving debug log to /var/log/letsencrypt/letsencrypt.log
        Plugins selected: Authenticator nginx, Installer nginx
        Enter email address (used for urgent renewal and security notices) (Enter 'c' to
        cancel): myemail@example.com
        
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Please read the Terms of Service at
        https://letsencrypt.org/documents/LE-SA-v1.2-November-15-2017.pdf. You must
        agree in order to register with the ACME server at
        https://acme-v02.api.letsencrypt.org/directory
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        (A)gree/(C)ancel: A
        
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Would you be willing to share your email address with the Electronic Frontier
        Foundation, a founding partner of the Let's Encrypt project and the non-profit
        organization that develops Certbot? We'd like to send you email about our work
        encrypting the web, EFF news, campaigns, and ways to support digital freedom.
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        (Y)es/(N)o: N
        
        Which names would you like to activate HTTPS for?
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        1: apache1.example.com
        2: nginx1.example.com
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Select the appropriate numbers separated by commas and/or spaces, or leave input
        blank to select all options shown (Enter 'c' to cancel): 1
        Obtaining a new certificate
        Performing the following challenges:
        http-01 challenge for apache1.example.com
        Waiting for verification...
        Cleaning up challenges
        Deploying Certificate to VirtualHost /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/apache1.example.com
        
        Please choose whether or not to redirect HTTP traffic to HTTPS, removing HTTP access.
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        1: No redirect - Make no further changes to the webserver configuration.
        2: Redirect - Make all requests redirect to secure HTTPS access. Choose this for
        new sites, or if you're confident your site works on HTTPS. You can undo this
        change by editing your web server's configuration.
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Select the appropriate number [1-2] then [enter] (press 'c' to cancel): 2
        Redirecting all traffic on port 80 to ssl in /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/apache1.example.com
        
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Congratulations! You have successfully enabled https://apache1.example.com
        
        You should test your configuration at:
        https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=apache1.example.com
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        
        IMPORTANT NOTES:
         - Congratulations! Your certificate and chain have been saved at:
           /etc/letsencrypt/live/apache1.example.com/fullchain.pem
           Your key file has been saved at:
           /etc/letsencrypt/live/apache1.example.com/privkey.pem
           Your cert will expire on 2019-10-07. To obtain a new or tweaked
           version of this certificate in the future, simply run certbot again
           with the "certonly" option. To non-interactively renew *all* of
           your certificates, run "certbot renew"
         - Your account credentials have been saved in your Certbot
           configuration directory at /etc/letsencrypt. You should make a
           secure backup of this folder now. This configuration directory will
           also contain certificates and private keys obtained by Certbot so
           making regular backups of this folder is ideal.
         - If you like Certbot, please consider supporting our work by:
        
           Donating to ISRG / Let's Encrypt:   https://letsencrypt.org/donate
           Donating to EFF:                    https://eff.org/donate-le
        
        
      6. Run certbot as root with the --nginx parameter in order to perform the auto-configuration of Let’s Encrypt for the second website. This is the second time we run certbot, therefore we are asked directly to select the website to configure.

        sudo certbot --nginx
        
          
        Saving debug log to /var/log/letsencrypt/letsencrypt.log
        Plugins selected: Authenticator nginx, Installer nginx
        
        Which names would you like to activate HTTPS for?
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        1: apache1.example.com
        2: nginx1.example.com
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Select the appropriate numbers separated by commas and/or spaces, or leave input
        blank to select all options shown (Enter 'c' to cancel): 2
        Obtaining a new certificate
        Performing the following challenges:
        http-01 challenge for nginx1.example.com
        Waiting for verification...
        Cleaning up challenges
        Deploying Certificate to VirtualHost /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/nginx1.example.com
        
        Please choose whether or not to redirect HTTP traffic to HTTPS, removing HTTP access.
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        1: No redirect - Make no further changes to the webserver configuration.
        2: Redirect - Make all requests redirect to secure HTTPS access. Choose this for
        new sites, or if you're confident your site works on HTTPS. You can undo this
        change by editing your web server's configuration.
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Select the appropriate number [1-2] then [enter] (press 'c' to cancel): 2
        Redirecting all traffic on port 80 to ssl in /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/nginx1.example.com
        
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Congratulations! You have successfully enabled https://nginx1.example.com
        
        You should test your configuration at:
        https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=nginx1.example.com
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        
        IMPORTANT NOTES:
         - Congratulations! Your certificate and chain have been saved at:
           /etc/letsencrypt/live/nginx1.example.com/fullchain.pem
           Your key file has been saved at:
           /etc/letsencrypt/live/nginx1.example.com/privkey.pem
           Your cert will expire on 2019-10-07. To obtain a new or tweaked
           version of this certificate in the future, simply run certbot again
           with the "certonly" option. To non-interactively renew *all* of
           your certificates, run "certbot renew"
         - If you like Certbot, please consider supporting our work by:
        
           Donating to ISRG / Let's Encrypt:   https://letsencrypt.org/donate
           Donating to EFF:                    https://eff.org/donate-le
        
        
      7. After adding all websites, perform a dry run in order to test the renewal of the certificates. Check that all websites are updating successfully to ensure the automated facility will update the certificates without further effort.

        sudo certbot renew --dry-run
        
          
        Saving debug log to /var/log/letsencrypt/letsencrypt.log
        
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Processing /etc/letsencrypt/renewal/apache1.example.com.conf
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Cert not due for renewal, but simulating renewal for dry run
        Plugins selected: Authenticator nginx, Installer nginx
        Renewing an existing certificate
        Performing the following challenges:
        http-01 challenge for apache1.example.com
        Waiting for verification...
        Cleaning up challenges
        
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        new certificate deployed with reload of nginx server; fullchain is
        /etc/letsencrypt/live/apache1.example.com/fullchain.pem
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Processing /etc/letsencrypt/renewal/nginx1.example.com.conf
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Cert not due for renewal, but simulating renewal for dry run
        Plugins selected: Authenticator nginx, Installer nginx
        Renewing an existing certificate
        Performing the following challenges:
        http-01 challenge for nginx1.example.com
        Waiting for verification...
        Cleaning up challenges
        
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        new certificate deployed with reload of nginx server; fullchain is
        /etc/letsencrypt/live/nginx1.example.com/fullchain.pem
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        ** DRY RUN: simulating 'certbot renew' close to cert expiry
        **          (The test certificates below have not been saved.)
        
        Congratulations, all renewals succeeded. The following certs have been renewed:
          /etc/letsencrypt/live/apache1.example.com/fullchain.pem (success)
          /etc/letsencrypt/live/nginx1.example.com/fullchain.pem (success)
        ** DRY RUN: simulating 'certbot renew' close to cert expiry
        **          (The test certificates above have not been saved.)
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        
        IMPORTANT NOTES:
         - Your account credentials have been saved in your Certbot
           configuration directory at /etc/letsencrypt. You should make a
           secure backup of this folder now. This configuration directory will
           also contain certificates and private keys obtained by Certbot so
           making regular backups of this folder is ideal.
        
        

        Note

        The certbot package adds a systemd timer in order to activate the automated renewal of Let’s Encrypt certificates. You can view the details of this timer by running systemctl list-timers.

      8. The certbot tool edits and changes the NGINX configuration files of your websites. In doing so, certbot does not obey initial listen directive (listen 80 proxy_protocol;) and does not add the proxy_protocol parameter to the newly added listen 443 ssl; lines. You must edit the configuration files for each website and append “proxy_protocol” to each “listen 443 ssl;” line.

        sudo nano /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/apache1.example.com
        sudo nano /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/nginx1.example.com
        
          
        listen 443 ssl proxy_protocol; # managed by Certbot
        listen [::]:443 ssl proxy_protocol; # managed by Certbot
        
        

        Note

        Each website configuration file has two pairs of listen directives: HTTP and HTTPS, respectively. The first is the original pair for HTTP that was added in a previous section. The second pair was added by certbot for HTTPS. These are pairs because they they cover both IPv4 and IPv6. The notation [::] refers to IPv6. When adding the parameter proxy_protocol, add it before the ; on each line as shown above.

      9. Restart NGINX.

        sudo systemctl restart nginx
        

      Troubleshooting

      Browser Error “SSL_ERROR_RX_RECORD_TOO_LONG”

      You have configured Certbot and created the appropriate Let’s Encrypt configuration for each website. But when you access the website from your browser, you get the following error.

        
      Secure Connection Failed
      
      An error occurred during a connection to apache1.example.com. SSL received a record that exceeded the maximum permissible length. Error code: SSL_ERROR_RX_RECORD_TOO_LONG
      
          The page you are trying to view cannot be shown because the authenticity of the received data could not be verified.
          Please contact the website owners to inform them of this problem.
      
      

      This error is caused when the NGINX reverse proxy in the proxy container does not have the proxy_protocol parameter in the listen 443 directives. Without the parameter, the reverse proxy does not consume the PROXY protocol information before it performs the HTTPS work. It mistakenly passes the PROXY protocol information to the HTTPS module, hence the record too long error.

      Follow the instructions in the previous section and add proxy_protocol to all listen 443 directives. Finally, restart NGINX.

      Error “Unable to connect” or “This site can’t be reached”

      When you attempt to connect to the website from your local computer and receive Unable to connect or This site can’t be reached errors, it is likely the proxy devices have not been configured.

      Run the following command on the host to verify whether LXD is listening and is able to accept connections to ports 80 (HTTP) and 443 (HTTPS).

      sudo ss -ltp '( sport = :http || sport = :https )'
      

      Note

      The ss command is similar to netstat and lsof. It shows information about network connections. In this case, we use it to verify whether there is a service on ports 80 and 443, and which service it is. * -l, to display the listening sockets, * -t, to display only TCP sockets, * -p, to show which processes use those sockets, * ( sport = :http || sport = :https ), to show only ports 80 and 443 (HTTP and HTTPS, respectively).

      In the following output we can verify that both ports 80 and 443 (HTTP and HTTPS, respectively) are in the LISTEN state. In the last column we verify that the process listening is lxd itself.

        
      State     Recv-Q  Send-Q   Local Address:Port   Peer Address:Port
      LISTEN    0       128                  *:http              *:*       users:(("lxd",pid=1301,fd=7),("lxd",pid=1301,fd=5))
      LISTEN    0       128                  *:https             *:*       users:(("lxd",pid=1349,fd=7),("lxd",pid=1349,fd=5))
      
      

      If you see a process listed other than lxd, stop that service and restart the proxy container. By restarting the proxy container, LXD will apply the proxy devices again.

      The Apache access.log Shows the IP Address of the Proxy Container

      You have set up the apache1 container and verified that it is accessible from the internet. But the logs at /var/log/apache2/access.log still show the private IP address of the proxy container, either the private IPv4 (10.x.x.x) or the private IPv6 addresses. What went wrong?

      The default log formats for printing access logs in Apache only print the IP address of the host of the last hop (i.e. the proxy server). This is the %h format specifier as shown below.

        
      LogFormat "%v:%p %h %l %u %t "%r" %>s %O "%{Referer}i" "%{User-Agent}i"" vhost_combined
      LogFormat "%h %l %u %t "%r" %>s %O "%{Referer}i" "%{User-Agent}i"" combined
      LogFormat "%h %l %u %t "%r" %>s %O" common
      
      

      The %h must be manually replaced with the %a format specifier, which prints the value as returned by the real RemoteIP Apache module.

        
      LogFormat "%v:%p %a %l %u %t "%r" %>s %O "%{Referer}i" "%{User-Agent}i"" vhost_combined
      LogFormat "%a %l %u %t "%r" %>s %O "%{Referer}i" "%{User-Agent}i"" combined
      LogFormat "%a %l %u %t "%r" %>s %O" common
      
      
      1. Run the following command in the apache1 container to edit the configuration file httpd.conf and perform the change from %h to %a.

        sudo nano /etc/apache2/apache2.conf
        
      2. Reload the Apache web server service.

        sudo systemctl reload apache2
        

      Next Steps

      You have set up a reverse proxy to host many websites on the same server and installed each website in a separate container. You can install static or dynamic websites in the containers. For dynamic websites, you may need additional configuration; check the respective documentation for setup using a reverse proxy. In addition, you may also use NGINX as a reverse proxy for non-HTTP(S) services.

      More Information

      You may wish to consult the following resources for additional information on this topic. While these are provided in the hope that they will be useful, please note that we cannot vouch for the accuracy or timeliness of externally hosted materials.

      Find answers, ask questions, and help others.

      This guide is published under a CC BY-ND 4.0 license.



      Source link

      Como Usar o Traefik como um Proxy Reverso para Containers do Docker no CentOS 7


      O autor selecionou o Girls Who Code para receber uma doação como parte do programa Write for DOnations.

      Introdução

      O Docker pode ser uma maneira eficiente de executar aplicativos web em produção, mas você pode querer executar vários aplicativos no mesmo host do Docker. Nesta situação, você precisará configurar um proxy reverso, já que você só deseja expor as portas 80 e 443 para o resto do mundo.

      O Traefik é um proxy reverso que reconhece o Docker e inclui seu próprio painel de monitoramento ou dashboard. Neste tutorial, você usará o Traefik para rotear solicitações para dois containers de aplicação web diferentes: um container WordPress e um container Adminer, cada um falando com um banco de dados MySQL. Você irá configurar o Traefik para servir tudo através de HTTPS utilizando o Let’s Encrypt.

      Pré-requisitos

      Para acompanhar este tutorial, você vai precisar do seguinte:

      Passo 1 — Configurando e Executando o Traefik

      O projeto do Traefik tem uma imagem Docker oficial, portanto vamos utilizá-la para executar o Traefik em um container Docker.

      Mas antes de colocarmos o nosso container Traefik em funcionamento, precisamos criar um arquivo de configuração e configurar uma senha criptografada para que possamos acessar o painel de monitoramento.

      Usaremos o utilitário htpasswd para criar essa senha criptografada. Primeiro, instale o utilitário, que está incluído no pacote httpd-tools:

      • sudo yum install -y httpd-tools

      Em seguida, gere a senha com o htpasswd. Substitua senha_segura pela senha que você gostaria de usar para o usuário admin do Traefik:

      • htpasswd -nb admin senha_segura

      A saída do programa ficará assim:

      Output

      admin:$apr1$kEG/8JKj$yEXj8vKO7HDvkUMI/SbOO.

      Você utilizará essa saída no arquivo de configuração do Traefik para configurar a Autenticação Básica de HTTP para a verificação de integridade do Traefik e para o painel de monitoramento. Copie toda a linha de saída para poder colá-la mais tarde.

      Para configurar o servidor Traefik, criaremos um novo arquivo de configuração chamado traefik.toml usando o formato TOML. O TOML é uma linguagem de configuração semelhante ao arquivos INI, mas padronizado. Esse arquivo nos permite configurar o servidor Traefik e várias integrações, ou providers, que queremos usar. Neste tutorial, usaremos três dos provedores disponíveis do Traefik: api,docker e acme, que é usado para suportar o TLS utilizando o Let’s Encrypt.

      Abra seu novo arquivo no vi ou no seu editor de textos favorito:

      Entre no modo de inserção pressionando i, adicione dois EntryPoints nomeados http ehttps, que todos os backends terão acesso por padrão:

      traefik.toml

      defaultEntryPoints = ["http", "https"]
      

      Vamos configurar os EntryPoints http e https posteriormente neste arquivo.

      Em seguida, configure o provider api, que lhe dá acesso a uma interface do painel. É aqui que você irá colar a saída do comando htpasswd:

      traefik.toml

      ...
      [entryPoints]
        [entryPoints.dashboard]
          address = ":8080"
          [entryPoints.dashboard.auth]
            [entryPoints.dashboard.auth.basic]
              users = ["admin:sua_senha_criptografada"]
      
      [api]
      entrypoint="dashboard"
      

      O painel é uma aplicação web separada que será executada no container do Traefik. Vamos definir o painel para executar na porta 8080.

      A seção entrypoints.dashboard configura como nos conectaremos com o provider da api, e a seção entrypoints.dashboard.auth.basic configura a Autenticação Básica HTTP para o painel. Use a saída do comando htpasswd que você acabou de executar para o valor da entrada users. Você poderia especificar logins adicionais, separando-os com vírgulas.

      Definimos nosso primeiro entryPoint, mas precisaremos definir outros para comunicação HTTP e HTTPS padrão que não seja direcionada para o provider da api. A seção entryPoints configura os endereços que o Traefik e os containers com proxy podem escutar. Adicione estas linhas ao arquivo logo abaixo do cabeçalho entryPoints:

      traefik.toml

      ...
        [entryPoints.http]
          address = ":80"
            [entryPoints.http.redirect]
              entryPoint = "https"
        [entryPoints.https]
          address = ":443"
            [entryPoints.https.tls]
      ...
      

      O entrypoint http manipula a porta 80, enquanto o entrypoint https usa a porta443 para o TLS/SSL. Redirecionamos automaticamente todo o tráfego na porta 80 para o entrypoint https para forçar conexões seguras para todas as solicitações.

      Em seguida, adicione esta seção para configurar o suporte ao certificado Let's Encrypt do Traefik:

      traefik.toml

      ...
      [acme]
      email = "seu_email@seu_domínio"
      storage = "acme.json"
      entryPoint = "https"
      onHostRule = true
        [acme.httpChallenge]
        entryPoint = "http"
      

      Esta seção é chamada acme porque ACME é o nome do protocolo usado para se comunicar com o Let's Encrypt para gerenciar certificados. O serviço Let's Encrypt requer o registro com um endereço de e-mail válido, portanto, para que o Traefik gere certificados para nossos hosts, defina a chave email como seu endereço de e-mail. Em seguida, vamos especificar que armazenaremos as informações que vamos receber do Let's Encrypt em um arquivo JSON chamado acme.json. A chave entryPoint precisa apontar para a porta de manipulação do entrypoint 443, que no nosso caso é o entrypoint https.

      A chave onHostRule determina como o Traefik deve gerar certificados. Queremos buscar nossos certificados assim que nossos containers com os nomes de host especificados forem criados, e é isso que a configuração onHostRule fará.

      A seção acme.httpChallenge nos permite especificar como o Let's Encrypt pode verificar se o certificado deve ser gerado. Estamos configurando-o para servir um arquivo como parte do desafio através do entrypoint http.

      Finalmente, vamos configurar o provider docker adicionando estas linhas ao arquivo:

      traefik.toml

      ...
      [docker]
      domain = "seu_domínio"
      watch = true
      network = "web"
      

      O provedor docker permite que o Traefik atue como um proxy na frente dos containers do Docker. Configuramos o provider para vigiar ou watch por novos containers na rede web (que criaremos em breve) e os expor como subdomínios de seu_domínio.

      Neste ponto, o traefik.toml deve ter o seguinte conteúdo:

      traefik.toml

      defaultEntryPoints = ["http", "https"]
      
      [entryPoints]
        [entryPoints.dashboard]
          address = ":8080"
          [entryPoints.dashboard.auth]
            [entryPoints.dashboard.auth.basic]
              users = ["admin:sua_senha_criptografada"]
        [entryPoints.http]
          address = ":80"
            [entryPoints.http.redirect]
              entryPoint = "https"
        [entryPoints.https]
          address = ":443"
            [entryPoints.https.tls]
      
      [api]
      entrypoint="dashboard"
      
      [acme]
      email = "seu_email@seu_domínio"
      storage = "acme.json"
      entryPoint = "https"
      onHostRule = true
        [acme.httpChallenge]
        entryPoint = "http"
      
      [docker]
      domain = "seu_domínio"
      watch = true
      network = "web"
      

      Depois de adicionar o conteúdo, pressione ESC para sair do modo de inserção. Digite :x e depois ENTER para salvar e sair do arquivo. Com toda essa configuração pronta, podemos ativar o Traefik.

      Passo 2 – Executando o Container Traefik

      Em seguida, crie uma rede do Docker para o proxy compartilhar com os containers. A rede do Docker é necessária para que possamos usá-la com aplicações que são executadas usando o Docker Compose. Vamos chamar essa rede de web.

      • docker network create web

      Quando o container Traefik iniciar, nós o adicionaremos a essa rede. Em seguida, podemos adicionar containers adicionais a essa rede posteriormente para o Traefik fazer proxy.

      Em seguida, crie um arquivo vazio que conterá as informações do Let's Encrypt. Compartilharemos isso no container para que o Traefik possa usá-lo:

      O Traefik só poderá usar esse arquivo se o usuário root dentro do container tiver acesso exclusivo de leitura e gravação a ele. Para fazer isso, bloqueie as permissões em acme.json para que somente o proprietário do arquivo tenha permissão de leitura e gravação.

      Depois que o arquivo for repassado para o Docker, o proprietário será automaticamente alterado para o usuário root dentro do container.

      Finalmente, crie o container Traefik com este comando:

      • docker run -d
      • -v /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock
      • -v $PWD/traefik.toml:/traefik.toml
      • -v $PWD/acme.json:/acme.json
      • -p 80:80
      • -p 443:443
      • -l traefik.frontend.rule=Host:monitor.seu_domínio
      • -l traefik.port=8080
      • --network web
      • --name traefik
      • traefik:1.7.6-alpine

      O comando é um pouco longo, então vamos dividi-lo.

      Usamos a flag -d para executar o container em segundo plano como um daemon. Em seguida, compartilhamos nosso arquivo docker.sock dentro do container para que o processo do Traefik possa escutar por alterações nos containers. Compartilhamos também o arquivo de configuração traefik.toml e o arquivoacme.json que criamos dentro do container.

      Em seguida, mapeamos as portas :80 e :443 do nosso host Docker para as mesmas portas no container Traefik, para que o Traefik receba todo o tráfego HTTP e HTTPS para o servidor.

      Em seguida, configuramos dois labels do Docker que informam ao Traefik para direcionar o tráfego para o monitor.seu_domínio para a porta :8080 dentro do container do Traefik, expondo o painel de monitoramento.

      Configuramos a rede do container para web, e nomeamos o container para traefik.

      Finalmente, usamos a imagem traefik:1.7.6-alpine para este container, porque é pequena.

      Um ENTRYPOINT da imagem do Docker é um comando que sempre é executado quando um container é criado a partir da imagem. Neste caso, o comando é o binário traefik dentro do container. Você pode passar argumentos adicionais para esse comando quando você inicia o container, mas definimos todas as nossas configurações no arquivo traefik.toml.

      Com o container iniciado, agora você tem um painel que você pode acessar para ver a integridade de seus containers. Você também pode usar este painel para visualizar os frontends e backends que o Traefik registrou. Acesse o painel de monitoramento apontando seu navegador para https://monitor.seu_domínio. Você será solicitado a fornecer seu nome de usuário e senha, que são admin e a senha que você configurou no Passo 1.

      Uma vez logado, você verá uma interface semelhante a esta:

      Empty Traefik dashboard

      Ainda não há muito o que ver, mas deixe essa janela aberta e você verá o conteúdo mudar à medida que você adiciona containers para o Traefik trabalhar.

      Agora temos nosso proxy Traefik em execução, configurado para funcionar com o Docker, e pronto para monitorar outros containers Docker. Vamos iniciar alguns containers para que o Traefik possa agir como proxy para eles.

      Com o container do Traefik em execução, você está pronto para executar aplicações por trás dele. Vamos lançar os seguintes containers por trás do Traefik:

      1. Um blog usando a imagem oficial do WordPress.

      2. Um servidor de gerenciamento de banco de dados usando a imagem oficial do Adminer.

      Vamos gerenciar essas duas aplicações com o Docker Compose usando um arquivo docker-compose.yml. Abra o arquivo docker-compose.yml em seu editor:

      Adicione as seguintes linhas ao arquivo para especificar a versão e as redes que usaremos:

      docker-compose.yml

      version: "3"
      
      networks:
        web:
          external: true
        internal:
          external: false
      

      Usamos a versão 3 do Docker Compose porque é a mais nova versão principal do formato de arquivo Compose.

      Para o Traefik reconhecer nossas aplicações, elas devem fazer parte da mesma rede e, uma vez que criamos a rede manualmente, nós a inserimos especificando o nome da rede web e configurandoexternal para true. Em seguida, definimos outra rede para que possamos conectar nossos containers expostos a um container de banco de dados que não vamos expor por meio do Traefik. Chamaremos essa rede de internal.

      Em seguida, definiremos cada um dos nossos serviços ou services, um de cada vez. Vamos começar com o container blog, que basearemos na imagem oficial do WordPress. Adicione esta configuração ao arquivo:

      docker-compose.yml

      version: "3"
      ...
      
      services:
        blog:
          image: wordpress:4.9.8-apache
          environment:
            WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD:
          labels:
            - traefik.backend=blog
            - traefik.frontend.rule=Host:blog.seu_domínio
            - traefik.docker.network=web
            - traefik.port=80
          networks:
            - internal
            - web
          depends_on:
            - mysql
      

      A chave environment permite que você especifique variáveis de ambiente que serão definidas dentro do container. Ao não definir um valor para WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD, estamos dizendo ao Docker Compose para obter o valor de nosso shell e repassá-lo quando criamos o container. Vamos definir essa variável de ambiente em nosso shell antes de iniciar os containers. Dessa forma, não codificamos senhas no arquivo de configuração.

      A seção labels é onde você especifica os valores de configuração do Traefik. As labels do Docker não fazem nada sozinhas, mas o Traefik as lê para saber como tratar os containers. Veja o que cada uma dessas labels faz:

      • traefik.backend especifica o nome do serviço de backend no Traefik (que aponta para o container real blog).
      • traefik.frontend.rule=Host:blog.seu_domínio diz ao Traefik para examinar o host solicitado e, se ele corresponde ao padrão de blog.seu_domínio, ele deve rotear o tráfego para o container blog.
      • traefik.docker.network=web especifica qual rede procurar sob o Traefik para encontrar o IP interno para esse container. Como o nosso container Traefik tem acesso a todas as informações do Docker, ele possivelmente levaria o IP para a rede internal se não especificássemos isso.
      • traefik.port especifica a porta exposta que o Traefik deve usar para rotear o tráfego para esse container.

      Com essa configuração, todo o tráfego enviado para a porta 80 do host do Docker será roteado para o container blog.

      Atribuímos este container a duas redes diferentes para que o Traefik possa encontrá-lo através da rede web e possa se comunicar com o container do banco de dados através da rede internal.

      Por fim, a chave depends_on informa ao Docker Compose que este container precisa ser iniciado após suas dependências estarem sendo executadas. Como o WordPress precisa de um banco de dados para ser executado, devemos executar nosso container mysql antes de iniciar nosso containerblog.

      Em seguida, configure o serviço MySQL adicionando esta configuração ao seu arquivo:

      docker-compose.yml

      services:
      ...
        mysql:
          image: mysql:5.7
          environment:
            MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD:
          networks:
            - internal
          labels:
            - traefik.enable=false
      

      Estamos usando a imagem oficial do MySQL 5.7 para este container. Você notará que estamos mais uma vez usando um item environment sem um valor. As variáveis MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD eWORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD precisarão ser configuradas com o mesmo valor para garantir que nosso container WordPress possa se comunicar com o MySQL. Nós não queremos expor o container mysql para o Traefik ou para o mundo externo, então estamos atribuindo este container apenas à rede internal. Como o Traefik tem acesso ao soquete do Docker, o processo ainda irá expor um frontend para o container mysql por padrão, então adicionaremos a label traefik.enable=false para especificar que o Traefik não deve expor este container.

      Por fim, adicione essa configuração para definir o container do Adminer:

      docker-compose.yml

      services:
      ...
        adminer:
          image: adminer:4.6.3-standalone
          labels:
            - traefik.backend=adminer
            - traefik.frontend.rule=Host:db-admin.seu_domínio
            - traefik.docker.network=web
            - traefik.port=8080
          networks:
            - internal
            - web
          depends_on:
            - mysql
      

      Este container é baseado na imagem oficial do Adminer. A configuração network e depends_on para este container corresponde exatamente ao que estamos usando para o container blog.

      No entanto, como estamos redirecionando todo o tráfego para a porta 80 em nosso host Docker diretamente para o container blog, precisamos configurar esse container de forma diferente para que o tráfego chegue ao container adminer. A linha traefik.frontend.rule=Host:db-admin.seu_domínio diz ao Traefik para examinar o host solicitado. Se ele corresponder ao padrão do db-admin.seu_domínio, o Traefik irá rotear o tráfego para o container adminer.

      Neste ponto, docker-compose.yml deve ter o seguinte conteúdo:

      docker-compose.yml

      version: "3"
      
      networks:
        web:
          external: true
        internal:
          external: false
      
      services:
        blog:
          image: wordpress:4.9.8-apache
          environment:
            WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD:
          labels:
            - traefik.backend=blog
            - traefik.frontend.rule=Host:blog.seu_domínio
            - traefik.docker.network=web
            - traefik.port=80
          networks:
            - internal
            - web
          depends_on:
            - mysql
        mysql:
          image: mysql:5.7
          environment:
            MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD:
          networks:
            - internal
          labels:
            - traefik.enable=false
        adminer:
          image: adminer:4.6.3-standalone
          labels:
            - traefik.backend=adminer
            - traefik.frontend.rule=Host:db-admin.seu_domínio
            - traefik.docker.network=web
            - traefik.port=8080
          networks:
            - internal
            - web
          depends_on:
            - mysql
      

      Salve o arquivo e saia do editor de texto.

      Em seguida, defina valores em seu shell para as variáveis WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD e MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD antes de iniciar seus containers:

      • export WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD=senha_segura_do_banco_de_dados
      • export MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD=senha_segura_do_banco_de_dados

      Substitua senha_segura_do_banco_de_dados pela sua senha do banco de dados desejada. Lembre-se de usar a mesma senha tanto para WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD quanto para MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD.

      Com estas variáveis definidas, execute os containers usando o docker-compose:

      Agora, dê outra olhada no painel de administrador do Traefik. Você verá que agora existe um backend e um frontend para os dois servidores expostos:

      Populated Traefik dashboard

      Navegue até blog.seu_domínio, substituindo seu_domínio pelo seu domínio. Você será redirecionado para uma conexão TLS e poderá agora concluir a configuração do WordPress:

      WordPress setup screen

      Agora acesse o Adminer visitando db-admin.seu_domínio no seu navegador, novamente substituindo seu_domínio pelo seu domínio. O container mysql não está exposto ao mundo externo, mas o container adminer tem acesso a ele através da rede internal do Docker que eles compartilham usando o nome do container mysql como um nome de host.

      Na tela de login do Adminer, use o nome de usuário root, use mysql para o server, e use o valor que você definiu para MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD para a senha. Uma vez logado, você verá a interface de usuário do Adminer:

      Adminer connected to the MySQL database

      Ambos os sites agora estão funcionando, e você pode usar o painel em monitor.seu_domínio para ficar de olho em suas aplicações.

      Conclusão

      Neste tutorial, você configurou o Traefik para fazer proxy das solicitações para outras aplicações em containers Docker.

      A configuração declarativa do Traefik no nível do container da aplicação facilita a configuração de mais serviços, e não há necessidade de reiniciar o container traefik quando você adiciona novas aplicações para fazer proxy, uma vez que o Traefik percebe as alterações imediatamente através do arquivo de soquete do Docker que ele está monitorando.

      Para saber mais sobre o que você pode fazer com o Traefik, consulte a documentação oficial do Traefik. Se você quiser explorar mais os containers Docker, confira Como Configurar um Registro Privado do Docker no Ubuntu 18.04 ou How To Secure a Containerized Node.js Application with Nginx, Let's Encrypt, and Docker Compose. Embora esses tutoriais sejam escritos para o Ubuntu 18.04, muitos dos comandos específicos do Docker podem ser usados para o CentOS 7.



      Source link

      Como Usar o Traefik como um Proxy Reverso para Containers do Docker no Ubuntu 18.04


      O autor selecionou o Girls Who Code para receber uma doação como parte do programa Write for DOnations.

      Introdução

      O Docker pode ser uma maneira eficiente de executar aplicativos web em produção, mas você pode querer executar vários aplicativos no mesmo host do Docker. Nesta situação, você precisará configurar um proxy reverso, já que você só deseja expor as portas 80 e 443 para o resto do mundo.

      O Traefik é um proxy reverso que reconhece o Docker e inclui seu próprio painel de monitoramento ou dashboard. Neste tutorial, você usará o Traefik para rotear solicitações para dois containers de aplicação web diferentes: um container WordPress e um container Adminer, cada um falando com um banco de dados MySQL. Você irá configurar o Traefik para servir tudo através de HTTPS utilizando o Let’s Encrypt.

      Pré-requisitos

      Para acompanhar este tutorial, você vai precisar do seguinte:

      Passo 1 — Configurando e Executando o Traefik

      O projeto do Traefik tem uma imagem Docker oficial, portanto vamos utilizá-la para executar o Traefik em um container Docker.

      Mas antes de colocarmos o nosso container Traefik em funcionamento, precisamos criar um arquivo de configuração e configurar uma senha criptografada para que possamos acessar o painel de monitoramento.

      Usaremos o utilitário htpasswd para criar essa senha criptografada. Primeiro, instale o utilitário, que está incluído no pacote apache2-utils:

      • sudo apt-get install apache2-utils

      Em seguida, gere a senha com o htpasswd. Substitua senha_segura pela senha que você gostaria de usar para o usuário admin do Traefik:

      • htpasswd -nb admin senha_segura

      A saída do programa ficará assim:

      Output

      admin:$apr1$ruca84Hq$mbjdMZBAG.KWn7vfN/SNK/

      Você utilizará essa saída no arquivo de configuração do Traefik para configurar a Autenticação Básica de HTTP para a verificação de integridade do Traefik e para o painel de monitoramento. Copie toda a linha de saída para poder colá-la mais tarde.

      Para configurar o servidor Traefik, criaremos um novo arquivo de configuração chamado traefik.toml usando o formato TOML. O TOML é uma linguagem de configuração semelhante ao arquivos INI, mas padronizado. Esse arquivo nos permite configurar o servidor Traefik e várias integrações, ou providers, que queremos usar. Neste tutorial, usaremos três dos provedores disponíveis do Traefik: api,docker e acme, que é usado para suportar o TLS utilizando o Let’s Encrypt.

      Abra seu novo arquivo no nano ou no seu editor de textos favorito:

      Primeiro, adicione dois EntryPoints nomeados http ehttps, que todos os backends terão acesso por padrão:

      traefik.toml

      defaultEntryPoints = ["http", "https"]
      

      Vamos configurar os EntryPoints http e https posteriormente neste arquivo.

      Em seguida, configure o provider api, que lhe dá acesso a uma interface do painel. É aqui que você irá colar a saída do comando htpasswd:

      traefik.toml

      
      ...
      [entryPoints]
        [entryPoints.dashboard]
          address = ":8080"
          [entryPoints.dashboard.auth]
            [entryPoints.dashboard.auth.basic]
              users = ["admin:sua_senha_criptografada"]
      
      [api]
      entrypoint="dashboard"
      

      O painel é uma aplicação web separada que será executada no container do Traefik. Vamos definir o painel para executar na porta 8080.

      A seção entrypoints.dashboard configura como nos conectaremos com o provider da api, e a seção entrypoints.dashboard.auth.basic configura a Autenticação Básica HTTP para o painel. Use a saída do comando htpasswd que você acabou de executar para o valor da entrada users. Você poderia especificar logins adicionais, separando-os com vírgulas.

      Definimos nosso primeiro entryPoint, mas precisaremos definir outros para comunicação HTTP e HTTPS padrão que não seja direcionada para o provider da api. A seção entryPoints configura os endereços que o Traefik e os containers com proxy podem escutar. Adicione estas linhas ao arquivo logo abaixo do cabeçalho entryPoints:

      traefik.toml

      
      ...
        [entryPoints.http]
          address = ":80"
            [entryPoints.http.redirect]
              entryPoint = "https"
        [entryPoints.https]
          address = ":443"
            [entryPoints.https.tls]
      ...
      

      O entrypoint http manipula a porta 80, enquanto o entrypoint https usa a porta443 para o TLS/SSL. Redirecionamos automaticamente todo o tráfego na porta 80 para o entrypoint https para forçar conexões seguras para todas as solicitações.

      Em seguida, adicione esta seção para configurar o suporte ao certificado Let's Encrypt do Traefik:

      traefik.toml

      ...
      [acme]
      email = "seu_email@seu_domínio"
      storage = "acme.json"
      entryPoint = "https"
      onHostRule = true
        [acme.httpChallenge]
        entryPoint = "http"
      

      Esta seção é chamada acme porque ACME é o nome do protocolo usado para se comunicar com o Let's Encrypt para gerenciar certificados. O serviço Let's Encrypt requer o registro com um endereço de e-mail válido, portanto, para que o Traefik gere certificados para nossos hosts, defina a chave email como seu endereço de e-mail. Em seguida, vamos especificar que armazenaremos as informações que vamos receber do Let's Encrypt em um arquivo JSON chamado acme.json. A chave entryPoint precisa apontar para a porta de manipulação do entrypoint 443, que no nosso caso é o entrypoint https.

      A chave onHostRule determina como o Traefik deve gerar certificados. Queremos buscar nossos certificados assim que nossos containers com os nomes de host especificados forem criados, e é isso que a configuração onHostRule fará.

      A seção acme.httpChallenge nos permite especificar como o Let's Encrypt pode verificar se o certificado deve ser gerado. Estamos configurando-o para servir um arquivo como parte do desafio através do entrypoint http.

      Finalmente, vamos configurar o provider docker adicionando estas linhas ao arquivo:

      traefik.toml

      
      ...
      [docker]
      domain = "seu_domínio"
      watch = true
      network = "web"
      

      O provedor docker permite que o Traefik atue como um proxy na frente dos containers do Docker. Configuramos o provider para vigiar ou watch por novos containers na rede web (que criaremos em breve) e os expor como subdomínios de seu_domínio.

      Neste ponto, o traefik.toml deve ter o seguinte conteúdo:

      traefik.toml

      defaultEntryPoints = ["http", "https"]
      
      [entryPoints]
        [entryPoints.dashboard]
          address = ":8080"
          [entryPoints.dashboard.auth]
            [entryPoints.dashboard.auth.basic]
              users = ["admin:sua_senha_criptografada"]
        [entryPoints.http]
          address = ":80"
            [entryPoints.http.redirect]
              entryPoint = "https"
        [entryPoints.https]
          address = ":443"
            [entryPoints.https.tls]
      
      [api]
      entrypoint="dashboard"
      
      [acme]
      email = "seu_email@seu_domínio"
      storage = "acme.json"
      entryPoint = "https"
      onHostRule = true
        [acme.httpChallenge]
        entryPoint = "http"
      
      [docker]
      domain = "seu_domínio"
      watch = true
      network = "web"
      

      Salve o arquivo e saia do editor. Com toda essa configuração pronta, podemos ativar o Traefik.

      Passo 2 – Executando o Container Traefik

      Em seguida, crie uma rede do Docker para o proxy compartilhar com os containers. A rede do Docker é necessária para que possamos usá-la com aplicações que são executadas usando o Docker Compose. Vamos chamar essa rede de web.

      • docker network create web

      Quando o container Traefik iniciar, nós o adicionaremos a essa rede. Em seguida, podemos adicionar containers adicionais a essa rede posteriormente para o Traefik fazer proxy.

      Em seguida, crie um arquivo vazio que conterá as informações do Let's Encrypt. Compartilharemos isso no container para que o Traefik possa usá-lo:

      O Traefik só poderá usar esse arquivo se o usuário root dentro do container tiver acesso exclusivo de leitura e gravação a ele. Para fazer isso, bloqueie as permissões em acme.json para que somente o proprietário do arquivo tenha permissão de leitura e gravação.

      Depois que o arquivo for repassado para o Docker, o proprietário será automaticamente alterado para o usuário root dentro do container.

      Finalmente, crie o container Traefik com este comando:

      • docker run -d
      • -v /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock
      • -v $PWD/traefik.toml:/traefik.toml
      • -v $PWD/acme.json:/acme.json
      • -p 80:80
      • -p 443:443
      • -l traefik.frontend.rule=Host:monitor.seu_domínio
      • -l traefik.port=8080
      • --network web
      • --name traefik
      • traefik:1.7.2-alpine

      O comando é um pouco longo, então vamos dividi-lo. Usamos a flag -d para executar o container em segundo plano como um daemon. Em seguida, compartilhamos nosso arquivo docker.sock dentro do container para que o processo do Traefik possa escutar por alterações nos containers. Compartilhamos também o arquivo de configuração traefik.toml e o arquivoacme.json que criamos dentro do container.

      Em seguida, mapeamos as portas :80 e :443 do nosso host Docker para as mesmas portas no container Traefik, para que o Traefik receba todo o tráfego HTTP e HTTPS para o servidor.

      Em seguida, configuramos dois labels do Docker que informam ao Traefik para direcionar o tráfego para o monitor.seu_domínio para a porta :8080 dentro do container do Traefik, expondo o painel de monitoramento.

      Configuramos a rede do container para web, e nomeamos o container para traefik.

      Finalmente, usamos a imagem traefik:1.7.2-alpine para este container, porque é pequena.

      Um ENTRYPOINT da imagem do Docker é um comando que sempre é executado quando um container é criado a partir da imagem. Neste caso, o comando é o binário traefik dentro do container. Você pode passar argumentos adicionais para esse comando quando você inicia o container, mas definimos todas as nossas configurações no arquivo traefik.toml.

      Com o container iniciado, agora você tem um painel que você pode acessar para ver a integridade de seus containers. Você também pode usar este painel para visualizar os frontends e backends que o Traefik registrou. Acesse o painel de monitoramento apontando seu navegador para https://monitor.seu_domínio. Você será solicitado a fornecer seu nome de usuário e senha, que são admin e a senha que você configurou no Passo 1.

      Uma vez logado, você verá uma interface semelhante a esta:

      Ainda não há muito o que ver, mas deixe essa janela aberta e você verá o conteúdo mudar à medida que você adiciona containers para o Traefik trabalhar.

      Agora temos nosso proxy Traefik em execução, configurado para funcionar com o Docker, e pronto para monitorar outros containers Docker. Vamos iniciar alguns containers para que o Traefik possa agir como proxy para eles.

      Com o container do Traefik em execução, você está pronto para executar aplicações por trás dele. Vamos lançar os seguintes containers por trás do Traefik:

      1. Um blog usando a imagem oficial do WordPress.

      2. Um servidor de gerenciamento de banco de dados usando a imagem oficial do Adminer.

      Vamos gerenciar essas duas aplicações com o Docker Compose usando um arquivo docker-compose.yml. Abra o arquivo docker-compose.yml em seu editor:

      Adicione as seguintes linhas ao arquivo para especificar a versão e as redes que usaremos:

      docker-compose.yml

      • version: "3"
      • networks:
      • web:
      • external: true
      • internal:
      • external: false

      Usamos a versão 3 do Docker Compose porque é a mais nova versão principal do formato de arquivo Compose.

      Para o Traefik reconhecer nossas aplicações, elas devem fazer parte da mesma rede e, uma vez que criamos a rede manualmente, nós a inserimos especificando o nome da rede web e configurandoexternal para true. Em seguida, definimos outra rede para que possamos conectar nossos containers expostos a um container de banco de dados que não vamos expor por meio do Traefik. Chamaremos essa rede de internal.

      Em seguida, definiremos cada um dos nossos serviços ou services, um de cada vez. Vamos começar com o container blog, que basearemos na imagem oficial do WordPress. Adicione esta configuração ao arquivo:

      docker-compose.yml

      
      version: "3"
      ...
      
      services:
        blog:
          image: wordpress:4.9.8-apache
          environment:
            WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD:
          labels:
            - traefik.backend=blog
            - traefik.frontend.rule=Host:blog.seu_domínio
            - traefik.docker.network=web
            - traefik.port=80
          networks:
            - internal
            - web
          depends_on:
            - mysql
      

      A chave environment permite que você especifique variáveis de ambiente que serão definidas dentro do container. Ao não definir um valor para WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD, estamos dizendo ao Docker Compose para obter o valor de nosso shell e repassá-lo quando criamos o container. Vamos definir essa variável de ambiente em nosso shell antes de iniciar os containers. Dessa forma, não codificamos senhas no arquivo de configuração.

      A seção labels é onde você especifica os valores de configuração do Traefik. As labels do Docker não fazem nada sozinhas, mas o Traefik as lê para saber como tratar os containers. Veja o que cada uma dessas labels faz:

      • traefik.backend especifica o nome do serviço de backend no Traefik (que aponta para o container real blog).

      • traefik.frontend.rule=Host:blog.seu_domínio diz ao Traefik para examinar o host solicitado e, se ele corresponde ao padrão de blog.seu_domínio, ele deve rotear o tráfego para o container blog.

      • traefik.docker.network=web especifica qual rede procurar sob o Traefik para encontrar o IP interno para esse container. Como o nosso container Traefik tem acesso a todas as informações do Docker, ele possivelmente levaria o IP para a rede internal se não especificássemos isso.

      • traefik.port especifica a porta exposta que o Traefik deve usar para rotear o tráfego para esse container.

      Com essa configuração, todo o tráfego enviado para a porta 80 do host do Docker será roteado para o container blog.

      Atribuímos este container a duas redes diferentes para que o Traefik possa encontrá-lo através da rede web e possa se comunicar com o container do banco de dados através da rede internal.

      Por fim, a chave depends_on informa ao Docker Compose que este container precisa ser iniciado após suas dependências estarem sendo executadas. Como o WordPress precisa de um banco de dados para ser executado, devemos executar nosso container mysql antes de iniciar nosso containerblog.

      Em seguida, configure o serviço MySQL adicionando esta configuração ao seu arquivo:

      docker-compose.yml

      
      services:
      ...
        mysql:
          image: mysql:5.7
          environment:
            MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD:
          networks:
            - internal
          labels:
            - traefik.enable=false
      

      Estamos usando a imagem oficial do MySQL 5.7 para este container. Você notará que estamos mais uma vez usando um item environment sem um valor. As variáveis MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD eWORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD precisarão ser configuradas com o mesmo valor para garantir que nosso container WordPress possa se comunicar com o MySQL. Nós não queremos expor o container mysql para o Traefik ou para o mundo externo, então estamos atribuindo este container apenas à rede internal. Como o Traefik tem acesso ao soquete do Docker, o processo ainda irá expor um frontend para o container mysql por padrão, então adicionaremos a label traefik.enable=false para especificar que o Traefik não deve expor este container.

      Por fim, adicione essa configuração para definir o container do Adminer:

      docker-compose.yml

      
      services:
      ...
        adminer:
          image: adminer:4.6.3-standalone
          labels:
            - traefik.backend=adminer
            - traefik.frontend.rule=Host:db-admin.seu_domínio
            - traefik.docker.network=web
            - traefik.port=8080
          networks:
            - internal
            - web
          depends_on:
            - mysql
      

      Este container é baseado na imagem oficial do Adminer. A configuração network e depends_on para este container corresponde exatamente ao que estamos usando para o container blog.

      No entanto, como estamos redirecionando todo o tráfego para a porta 80 em nosso host Docker diretamente para o container blog, precisamos configurar esse container de forma diferente para que o tráfego chegue ao container adminer. A linha traefik.frontend.rule=Host:db-admin.seu_domínio diz ao Traefik para examinar o host solicitado. Se ele corresponder ao padrão do db-admin.seu_domínio, o Traefik irá rotear o tráfego para o container adminer.

      Neste ponto, docker-compose.yml deve ter o seguinte conteúdo:

      docker-compose.yml

      
      version: "3"
      
      networks:
        web:
          external: true
        internal:
          external: false
      
      services:
        blog:
          image: wordpress:4.9.8-apache
          environment:
            WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD:
          labels:
            - traefik.backend=blog
            - traefik.frontend.rule=Host:blog.seu_domínio
            - traefik.docker.network=web
            - traefik.port=80
          networks:
            - internal
            - web
          depends_on:
            - mysql
        mysql:
          image: mysql:5.7
          environment:
            MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD:
          networks:
            - internal
          labels:
            - traefik.enable=false
        adminer:
          image: adminer:4.6.3-standalone
          labels:
            - traefik.backend=adminer
            - traefik.frontend.rule=Host:db-admin.seu_domínio
            - traefik.docker.network=web
            - traefik.port=8080
          networks:
            - internal
            - web
          depends_on:
            - mysql
      

      Salve o arquivo e saia do editor de texto.

      Em seguida, defina valores em seu shell para as variáveis WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD e MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD antes de iniciar seus containers:

      • export WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD=senha_segura_do_banco_de_dados
      • export MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD=senha_segura_do_banco_de_dados

      Substitua senhaseguradobancodedados pela sua senha do banco de dados desejada. Lembre-se de usar a mesma senha tanto para `WORDPRESSDBPASSWORDquanto paraMYSQLROOT_PASSWORD`.

      Com estas variáveis definidas, execute os containers usando o docker-compose:

      Agora, dê outra olhada no painel de administrador do Traefik. Você verá que agora existe um backend e um frontend para os dois servidores expostos:

      Navegue até blog.seu_domínio, substituindo seu_domínio pelo seu domínio. Você será redirecionado para uma conexão TLS e poderá agora concluir a configuração do WordPress:

      Agora acesse o Adminer visitando db-admin.seu_domínio no seu navegador, novamente substituindo seu_domínio pelo seu domínio. O container mysql não está exposto ao mundo externo, mas o container adminer tem acesso a ele através da rede internal do Docker que eles compartilham usando o nome do container mysql como um nome de host.

      Na tela de login do Adminer, use o nome de usuário root, use mysql para o server, e use o valor que você definiu para MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD para a senha. Uma vez logado, você verá a interface de usuário do Adminer:

      Ambos os sites agora estão funcionando, e você pode usar o painel em monitor.seu_domínio para ficar de olho em suas aplicações.

      Conclusão

      Neste tutorial, você configurou o Traefik para fazer proxy das solicitações para outras aplicações em containers Docker.

      A configuração declarativa do Traefik no nível do container da aplicação facilita a configuração de mais serviços, e não há necessidade de reiniciar o container traefik quando você adiciona novas aplicações para fazer proxy, uma vez que o Traefik percebe as alterações imediatamente através do arquivo de soquete do Docker que ele está monitorando.

      Para saber mais sobre o que você pode fazer com o Traefik, consulte a documentação oficial do Traefik.

      Por Keith Thompson



      Source link