One place for hosting & domains

      Building a Minimal, Production Ready Infrastructure on DigitalOcean


      Video

      Introduction

      Cloud infrastructure can be complex. Figuring out which products and services from a list of unfamiliar terms can be a daunting task. Join Developer Advocate Mason Egger as he walks you through how to build a minimal, production-ready architecture that pieces together many of DigitalOcean’s products. We’ll use Terraform to build a production ready infrastructure for your project or business in real time. Follow along or spin up your own. The code is hosted on GitHub here.

      Watch this talk to learn

      • How to integrate DigitalOcean Droplet, DBaaS, LBaaS, VPC, Firewall, and DNS into a production ready infrastructure
      • The importance of VPCs and how they benefit your infrastructure
      • How to use Terraform to stand up your infrastructure with a few commands

      Resources

      • Ready to deploy code can be found on GitHub
      • New to Terraform? Learn how to use it using this GitHub Repo

      About the Presenter

      Mason Egger (@masonegger) is currently a Developer Advocate at DigitalOcean who specializes in cloud infrastructure, distributed systems, and Python. Prior to his work at DigitalOcean, he was an SRE (Site Reliability Engineer) helping build and maintain a highly available hybrid multicloud PaaS. He is an avid programmer, speaker, educator, and writer/blogger. He is a maintainer of the DigitalOcean Terraform provider and contributes to random open source projects here and there. In his spare time he enjoys reading, camping, kayaking, and exploring new places.





      Source link

      3 Tips for Making Sure Your Brand’s Website Is Ready on Super Bowl Sunday


      Editor’s note: This article was originally published Jan. 31, 2020 on Adweek.com.

      There’s a hidden cost to even the most successful, buzz-generating Super Bowl ads: All that hard-earned (and expensively acquired) attention can easily bring a website to a standstill or break it altogether.

      We’re 12-plus years into the “second screen” era, and websites and applications during the Big Game are still frequently overwhelmed by the influx of visitors eagerly answering calls to action. Last year it was the CBS service streaming the game itself that failed to stay fully operational. In 2017, it was a lumber company taking a polarizing post-election stand. Advertisers in 2016’s game collectively witnessed website load time increases of 38%, with one retail tech company’s page crawling at 10-plus seconds.

      We pay a lot of attention to the ballooning per-second costs of these prized spots. We need to make more of a fuss around the opportunity costs of sites that buckle under the pressure of their brand’s own success.

      Note that a mere tenth of second slowdown on a website can take a heavy toll on conversion rates. Any length of time beyond that will send viewers back to their Twitter feeds. For first-time advertisers, this is an audience they may never see again. For big consumer brands, the expected hype can pivot quickly to reputation damage control. For ecommerce brands, downtime is a disaster that could mean millions in lost revenue.

      This year’s game may or may not yield another showcase example, but there’s a lesson here for marketers for brands of all sizes. Align your planned or unplanned viral triumphs with a tech infrastructure capable of rising to the occasion.

      To do so, lets briefly address two reasons why gaffes like this happen. The first, lightly technical explanation is that crashes and overloads occur when the number of requests and connections made by visitors outweigh the resources allocated to the website’s servers. The second, much-less-technical explanation is because executives didn’t sit down with their IT team early enough (or at all) to prevent explanation one.

      So, in that spirit of friendly interdepartmental alignment, here are a few pointers:

      Focus on the Site’s Purpose

      What’s the ideal user experience for those fleeting moments you hold a visitor’s attention? Answering this simple question will help your IT partners think holistically, identify potential bottlenecks in the system and allocate the right amount of resources to your web infrastructure.

      For instance, if you’re driving viewers to a video, your outbound bandwidth will need to pack a punch. If you’re an ecommerce site processing a high volume of transactions concurrently, you’ll need a lot of computer power and memory to handle dynamic requests. Image-heavy web assets may need compression tools. In any instance, your IT team will need to be ready with scalable contingencies. It’s why we see more enterprises adopting sophisticated multi-cloud and networking strategies that ensure key assets remain online through the peaks and valleys.

      Have the Cybersecurity Talk

      Mass publicity could very well make your website a target for bad actors. It’s the simple reality in an economy that’s increasingly digital. Ensure information security experts probe your site for vulnerabilities prior to major campaigns. Similarly, ask your IT team if your network can fend off denial of service attacks in which malicious actors send a deluge of fake traffic to your servers for the sole purpose of taking you offline. While these attacks are increasingly powerful and prevalent, gains in automation and machine learning mean they can be mitigated with the right tools.

      Don’t Forget the Dress Rehearsal

      If you’re planning a major campaign or your business is prone to seasonal traffic spikes, request that your tech partners run load tests. You’ll see firsthand what happens to your site performance when, for instance, your social team’s meme game finally strikes gold.

      Ultimately, website performance should be a 24/7 consideration. Ask your IT team about their monitoring tools in place and, more importantly, the processes and people at the ready to take any necessary action.

      Here’s hoping Sunday’s advertisers don’t squander their 15 minutes of fame with a 15-second page load. But if history does repeat itself, use it as fuel to ensure it doesn’t happen to you.

      Jennifer Curry
      • SVP, Global Cloud Services


      Jennifer Curry is SVP, Global Cloud Services. She is an operational and technology leader with over 17 years of experience in the IT industry, including seven years in the hosting/cloud market. READ MORE



      Source link

      Ready To Start an Online Business? 5 Traits of Successful Entrepreneurs


      Today marks the beginning of Small Business Month, a national celebration of entrepreneurs and small business owners across America. While these businesses may be small in size, their potential is anything but: giants like Facebook, Apple, and Google initially started as one- or two-person shops. Even DreamHost was started in a dorm room!

      While many people aspire to run their own businesses, not everyone is cut out to be an entrepreneur — especially in the digital age. It takes a specific type of personality to handle the nuts and bolts that make up an online business. To help you decide if you’ve got what it takes to start your own web-based biz, we’ve compiled this list of vital entrepreneur characteristics.

      Can you handle the hustle?

      1. They’re Highly Motivated

      Being an entrepreneur means being your own boss. Not having a supervisor may sound like a huge perk, but when nobody is around to tell you what to do, it’s easy to sink into stagnation. And that’s not going to work — especially on the web. Successful business owners are people who are good at self-motivating. They know that no boss will tell them to hurry up and finish that project — they’ve just got to make it happen all by themselves.

      Kevin Plank, the CEO of Under Armour, says that while it’s easy to make excuses for why you’re not building a business, a real entrepreneur will simply go for it anyway: “There’s an entrepreneur right now, scared to death, making excuses, saying, ‘It’s not the right time just yet.’ There’s no such thing as a good time.”

      His tough-love approach is typical of the entrepreneurial mindset. “I started an apparel-manufacturing business in the tech-boom years,” he says. “I mean, come on. Get out of your garage and go take a chance and start your business.”

      Plank initially began Under Armour out of his grandmother’s basement. Today, his company employs 11,000 people and earns $4 billion in yearly revenue — a small business no more! — but it would never have gotten off the ground if he hadn’t taken his role as his own boss seriously and amped up his self-motivation.

      2. They Embrace Technology

      Good entrepreneurs know that the tools of the trade are always changing, so they never get too comfortable. They know they can best serve their customers by keeping up to date with the latest solutions technology offers.

      Today successful entrepreneurs know that every business, no matter the size, needs to have an online presence. Potential customers spend more than 10 hours a day looking at screens, so a website is the best way to get eyes on your service or product. And having a website doesn’t mean having just any website; ideally, you’ll have one that loads quickly, looks equally great on desktop and mobile, and stays online with little downtime.

      DreamHost knows what small business owners need — after all, more than 90 percent of our customers are in business for themselves. For entrepreneurs who’d rather be focusing on customers than worrying about websites, our DreamPress service removes the guesswork, keeping customers’ WordPress sites automatically configured so they can focus on growing their business.

      3. They’re Focused on the Customer

      You can’t run a successful website or business if nobody is interested in buying your product or service. That’s why good entrepreneurs know that customer retention should be the crux of their operation.

      Jeff Bezos, the CEO of Amazon, initially set up his company in his garage. He says there’s never been a moment, from those one-man days until now, when he took his customers for granted. “We see our customers as invited guests to a party, and we are the hosts. It’s our job every day to make every important aspect of the customer experience a little bit better,” he said.

      Perhaps that’s why Amazon has such a massive customer base today. Rather than treating buyers like a necessary evil that keeps him in business, Bezos saw them as invitees that must continuously be courted and made to feel appreciated.

      Want to More Small-Biz Tips?

      Subscribe to the DreamHost Digest for inside scoops, expert advice, and exclusive deals.

      4. They Fail and Try Again

      Top entrepreneurs know that getting it wrong sometimes is simply part of the game. They’re not held back by their setbacks, but see the entrepreneurial process as a learning experience.

      Drew Houston, the CEO and co-founder of Dropbox, has declared, “Don’t worry about failure; you only have to be right once.” In fact, sometimes your previous failures pave the way for your future successes. Before striking gold with Dropbox, Houston worked on a number of other startups, most of which you haven’t heard of because they never went anywhere. But those early attempts taught Houston how to run a successful company later on.

      5. They Differentiate Their Products

      The best entrepreneurs take a timeless or popular idea and find a way to make it fresh. For example, did you know there are over 117 companies that make mobile phones? But when consumers need a new phone, it’s rare they will look at every mobile device each of these 117 companies makes.

      Instead, most consumers will pick from the top three companies that have differentiated their products most effectively: Samsung, Apple, and Huawei. The success of these three mobile device companies is evidenced by each holding the top three highest portions of the industry’s market share, respectively.

      Differentiation is something Sara Blakely, the founder of the popular shapewear company Spanx, knows a lot about.

      While Spanx performs the same function as a corset or a girdle — items of clothing people have worn for centuries — Blakely put a new, sexy spin on the product. With Spanx, Blakely made shapewear comfortable, easy to put on, and impossible to detect under even the slimmest of clothing. To top it off, she differentiated her product by branding it with a fun and memorable name.

      Blakely’s ability to take an old-fashioned item of clothing and successfully differentiate it from all other shapewear helped propel her from a failing salesperson to a billionaire in just a manner of years. Blakely encourages would-be entrepreneurs to ask themselves the following questions as they start their businesses: “Why are you different? What’s important about you? Why does the customer need you?”

      You Can Do It!

      Just as with any other job, becoming self-employed requires its own set of entrepreneurial skills. Owning your own business calls for grit, determination, flexibility, and the willingness to make a business plan and brew the coffee. Starting a company is never easy, but if you see a bit of yourself in this list, you might just be ready to take the plunge.

      Do You Have What It Takes?

      You’re gonna need a website for that shiny new business. Let our DreamPress experts help you create a WordPress website today.



      Source link