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      Reference

      Reference: CSS Color Names


      While this tutorial has content that we believe is of great benefit to our community, we have not yet tested or
      edited it to ensure you have an error-free learning experience. It’s on our list, and we’re working on it!
      You can help us out by using the “report an issue” button at the bottom of the tutorial.

      HEX, RGB(a) & HSL(a) are all great, but with can also use keyword names for 140 colors. Here’s a reference for all of them, along with their HEX equivalent, in alphabetical order. Note that there’s really 147 in there, but 7 of them have duplicates (grey and gray for example). Everything is included along with the new color names from CSS3 and rebeccapurple from CSS Color Level 4:

      Name HEX Color
      aliceblue #F0F8FF
      antiquewhite #FAEBD7
      aqua #00FFFF
      aquamarine #7FFFD4
      azure #F0FFFF
      beige #F5F5DC
      bisque #FFE4C4
      black #000000
      blanchedalmond #FFEBCD
      blue #0000FF
      blueviolet #8A2BE2
      brown #A52A2A
      burlywood #DEB887
      cadetblue #5F9EA0
      chartreuse #7FFF00
      chocolate #D2691E
      coral #FF7F50
      cornflowerblue #6495ED
      cornsilk #FFF8DC
      crimson #DC143C
      cyan #00FFFF
      darkblue #00008B
      darkcyan #008B8B
      darkgoldenrod #B8860B
      darkgray #A9A9A9
      darkgreen #006400
      darkgrey #A9A9A9
      darkkhaki #BDB76B
      darkmagenta #8B008B
      darkolivegreen #556B2F
      darkorange #FF8C00
      darkorchid #9932CC
      darkred #8B0000
      darksalmon #E9967A
      darkseagreen #8FBC8F
      darkslateblue #483D8B
      darkslategray #2F4F4F
      darkslategrey #2F4F4F
      darkturquoise #00CED1
      darkviolet #9400D3
      deeppink #FF1493
      deepskyblue #00BFFF
      dimgray #696969
      dimgrey #696969
      dodgerblue #1E90FF
      firebrick #B22222
      floralwhite #FFFAF0
      forestgreen #228B22
      fuchsia #FF00FF
      gainsboro #DCDCDC
      ghostwhite #F8F8FF
      gold #FFD700
      goldenrod #DAA520
      gray #808080
      green #008000
      greenyellow #ADFF2F
      grey #808080
      honeydew #F0FFF0
      hotpink #FF69B4
      indianred #CD5C5C
      indigo #4B0082
      ivory #FFFFF0
      khaki #F0E68C
      lavender #E6E6FA
      lavenderblush #FFF0F5
      lawngreen #7CFC00
      lemonchiffon #FFFACD
      lightblue #ADD8E6
      lightcoral #F08080
      lightcyan #E0FFFF
      lightgoldenrodyellow #FAFAD2
      lightgray #D3D3D3
      lightgreen #90EE90
      lightgrey #D3D3D3
      lightpink #FFB6C1
      lightsalmon #FFA07A
      lightseagreen #20B2AA
      lightskyblue #87CEFA
      lightslategray #778899
      lightslategrey #778899
      lightsteelblue #B0C4DE
      lightyellow #FFFFE0
      lime #00FF00
      limegreen #32CD32
      linen #FAF0E6
      magenta #FF00FF
      maroon #800000
      mediumaquamarine #66CDAA
      mediumblue #0000CD
      mediumorchid #BA55D3
      mediumpurple #9370DB
      mediumseagreen #3CB371
      mediumslateblue #7B68EE
      mediumspringgreen #00FA9A
      mediumturquoise #48D1CC
      mediumvioletred #C71585
      midnightblue #191970
      mintcream #F5FFFA
      mistyrose #FFE4E1
      moccasin #FFE4B5
      navajowhite #FFDEAD
      navy #000080
      oldlace #FDF5E6
      olive #808000
      olivedrab #6B8E23
      orange #FFA500
      orangered #FF4500
      orchid #DA70D6
      palegoldenrod #EEE8AA
      palegreen #98FB98
      paleturquoise #AFEEEE
      palevioletred #DB7093
      papayawhip #FFEFD5
      peachpuff #FFDAB9
      peru #CD853F
      pink #FFC0CB
      plum #DDA0DD
      powderblue #B0E0E6
      purple #800080
      rebeccapurple #663399
      red #FF0000
      rosybrown #BC8F8F
      royalblue #4169E1
      saddlebrown #8B4513
      salmon #FA8072
      sandybrown #F4A460
      seagreen #2E8B57
      seashell #FFF5EE
      sienna #A0522D
      silver #C0C0C0
      skyblue #87CEEB
      slateblue #6A5ACD
      slategray #708090
      slategrey #708090
      snow #FFFAFA
      springgreen #00FF7F
      steelblue #4682B4
      tan #D2B48C
      teal #008080
      thistle #D8BFD8
      tomato #FF6347
      turquoise #40E0D0
      violet #EE82EE
      wheat #F5DEB3
      white #FFFFFF
      whitesmoke #F5F5F5
      yellow #FFFF00
      yellowgreen #9ACD32



      Source link

      Kubernetes Reference Guide


      Updated by Linode

      Contributed by

      Linode

      This is a reference for common Kubernetes terminology.

      Calico

      Calico is an implementation of Kubernetes’ networking model, and it served as the original reference for the Kubernetes NetworkPolicy API during its development. Calico also provides advanced policy enforcement capabilities that extend beyond Kubernetes’ NetworkPolicy API, and these can be used by administrators alongside that API. Calico uses BGP to distribute routes for Kubernetes Pods, without the need for overlays.

      Cluster

      A group of servers containing at least one master node and one or more worker nodes.

      Container

      Similar to virtual machines, containers are isolated runtimes that you can run your applications and services inside. Containers consume fewer resources than virtual machines, as they do not attempt to emulate a full operating system running on dedicated hardware. Instead, containers only bundle the files, environment variables, and libraries needed by the applications they run, and they share the other resources of the operating system that hosts them.

      Containerization

      Containerization is a software architecture practice that organizes applications and their dependencies in containers. Containerizing an application requires a base image that can be used to create an instance of a container. Once an application’s image exists, you can push it to a centralized container registry. Docker, Kubernetes, and other orchestration tools can download images from a registry to deploy container instances.

      Container Storage Interface

      The Container Storage Interface (CSI) specification provides a common storage interface for container orchestrators like Kubernetes (and others, like Mesos). The interface is used by an orchestrator to attach storage volumes to containers and to manage the lifecycle of those volumes.

      The objective of this specification is to allow cloud computing platforms to develop a single storage plugin that works with any container orchestrator. Linode has authored a CSI driver for Linode’s Block Storage service, which makes Block Storage Volumes available to your containers.

      Controller

      A Kubernetes Controller is a control loop that continuously watches the Kubernetes API and tries to manage the desired state of certain aspects of the cluster. Examples of different Controllers include:

      • ReplicaSets, which manage the number of running instances of a particular Pod.
      • Deployments, which manage the number of running instances of a particular Pod and can perform upgrades of Pods to new versions.
      • Jobs, which manage Pods that perform one-off tasks.

      Control Plane

      kube-apiserver, kube-controller-manager, kube-scheduler, and etcd form what is known as the Control Plane of a Kubernetes cluster. The Control Plane is responsible for keeping a record of the state of a cluster, making decisions about the cluster, and pushing the cluster towards new desired states.

      Deployment

      A Deployment can manage a ReplicaSet, so it shares the ability to keep a defined number of replica Pods up and running. A Deployment can also update those Pods to resemble the desired state by means of rolling updates. For example, if you wanted to update a container image to a newer version, you would create a Deployment, and the Controller would update the container images one by one until the desired state is achieved. This ensures that there is no downtime when updating or altering your Pods.

      Docker

      Docker is a tool that allows quick deployment of apps in containers using operating system level virtualization. While Kubernetes supports several container runtimes, Docker is a very popular option.

      Dockerfile

      A Dockerfile contains all commands, in their required order of execution, needed to build a given Docker image. For example, a Dockerfile might contain instructions for:

      • Installing a specific operating system referencing another image,
      • Installing an application’s dependencies, and
      • Executing configuration commands in the running container.

      Docker Hub

      Docker Hub is a centralized container image registry that can host your images and make them available for sharing and deployment. You can also find and use official Docker images and vendor specific images. When combined with a remote version control service, like GitHub, Docker Hub can automate the build process for images and can trigger actions for further automation with other services and tooling.

      etcd

      etcd is a highly available key-value store that provides the backend database for Kubernetes.

      Flannel

      Flannel is a networking overlay that meets the functionality of the Kubernetes. Flannel supplies a layer 3 network fabric and is relatively easy to set up.

      Helm

      Helm is a tool that assists with installing and managing applications on Kubernetes clusters. It is often referred to as “the package manager for Kubernetes,” and it provides functions that are similar to a package manager for an operating system.

      Helm Charts

      The software packaging format for Helm. A Helm chart specifies a file and directory structure for packaging your Kubernetes manifests.

      Helm Client

      The Helm client software issues commands to your cluster that can install new applications, upgrade them, and delete them. You run the client software on your computer, in your CI/CD environment, or anywhere else you’d like.

      Helm Tiller

      A server component that runs on your cluster and receives commands from the Helm client software. Tiller is responsible for directly interacting with the Kubernetes API (which the client software does not do). Tiller maintains the state for your Helm releases.

      Job

      A Job is a Controller which manages Pods created for a single or a set of tasks. This is handy if you need to create a Pod that performs a single function, or calculates a value. The deletion of the Job will delete the Pod.

      kube-apiserver

      The kube-apiserver is the front end for the Kubernetes API server. Validates and configures data for Kubernetes’ API objects including Pods, Services, Deployments, and more.

      kube-controller-manager

      The kube-controller-manager is a daemon that manages the Kubernetes control loop. It watches the shared state of the cluster through the Kubernetes API server.

      kube-proxy

      The kube-proxy is a networking proxy that proxies the UDP, TCP, and SCTP networking of each node, and provides load balancing. This is only used to connect to Services.

      kube-scheduler

      The kube-scheduler is a function that looks for newly created Pods that have no nodes. kube-scheduler assigns Pods to a nodes based on a host of requirements.

      kubeadm

      kubeadm is a cloud provider-agnostic tool that automates many of the tasks required to get a cluster up and running. Users of kubeadm can run a few simple commands on individual servers to turn them into a Kubernetes cluster consisting of a master node and worker nodes.

      kubectl

      kubectl is a command line tool used to interact with the Kubernetes cluster. It offers a host of features, including:

      • Creating, stopping, and deleting resources
      • Describing active resources
      • Auto scaling resources.

      kubelet

      kubelet is an agent that receives descriptions of the desired state of a Pod from the API server and ensures the Pod is healthy and running on its node.

      Kubernetes

      Kubernetes, often referred to as “k8s”, is an open source container orchestration system that helps deploy and manage containerized applications. Developed by Google starting in 2014 and written in the Go language, Kubernetes is quickly becoming the standard way to architect horizontally-scalable applications.

      Kubernetes Manifests

      Files, often written in YAML, used to create, modify, and delete Kubernetes resources such as Pods, Deployments, and Services.

      Linode Cloud Controller Manager

      The Linode Cloud Controller Manager (CCM) creates a fully supported Kubernetes experience on Linode:

      • Linode NodeBalancers are automatically deployed when a Kubernetes Service of type “LoadBalancer” is deployed. This is the most reliable way to allow services running in your cluster to be reachable from the Internet.

      • Linode hostnames and network addresses (private/public IPs) are automatically associated with their corresponding Kubernetes resources, forming the basis for a variety of Kubernetes features.

      • Node resources are put into the correct state when Linodes are shut down, allowing Pods to be appropriately rescheduled.

      • Nodes are annotated with the Linode region, which is the basis for scheduling based on failure domains.

      Linode k8s-alpha CLI

      The Linode k8s-alpha CLI is a plugin for the Linode CLI that offers quick, single-command deployments of Kubernetes clusters on your Linode account.

      Linode NodeBalancer

      NodeBalancers are highly-available, managed, cloud based “load balancers as a service”. They intelligently route incoming requests to backend Linodes to help your application cope with load, and to increase your application’s availability.

      Master Server

      The Kubernetes Master is normally a separate server in a Kubernetes cluster responsible for maintaining the desired state of the cluster. It does this by telling the nodes how many instances of your application it should run and where.

      Namespaces

      Namespaces are virtual clusters that exist within the Kubernetes cluster that help to group and organize Kubernetes API objects. Every cluster has at least three Namespaces: default, kube-system, and kube-public. When interacting with the cluster it is important to know which Namespace the object you are looking for is in, as many commands will default to only showing you what exists in the default Namespace. Resources created without an explicit Namespace will be added to the default Namespace.

      Orchestration

      Orchestration is the automated configuration, coordination, and management of computer systems, software, middleware, and services. It takes advantage of automated tasks to execute processes. The subject of orchestration is often discussed in reference to lifecycle management for containers, a practice known as container orchestration.

      Pod

      A Pod is the smallest deployable unit of computing in the Kubernetes architecture. A Pod is a group of one or more containers with shared resources and a specification for how to run these containers. Each Pod has its own IP address in the cluster. Pods are “mortal,” which means that they are created and destroyed depending on the needs of the application

      Rancher

      Rancher is a web application that provides a GUI interface for cluster creation and for the management of clusters. Rancher also provides easy interfaces for deploying and scaling apps on your clusters, and it has a built-in catalog of curated apps to choose from.

      ReplicaSet

      A ReplicaSet is one of the Controllers responsible for keeping a given number of replica Pods running. If one Pod goes down in a ReplicaSet, another will be created to replace it. In this way, Kubernetes is self-healing. However, for most use cases it is recommended to use a Deployment instead of a ReplicaSet.

      REST

      REST stands for REpresentational State Transfer. It is an architectural style for network based software that requires stateless, cacheable, client-server communication via a uniform interface between components. The HTTP protocol is most often used in RESTful applications.

      Services

      Services group identical Pods together to provide a consistent means of accessing them. Each service is given an IP address and a corresponding DNS entry. Services exist across nodes. There are four types of Services:

      • ClusterIP: exposes the Service internally to the cluster; this is the default type of Service.

      • NodePort: exposes the Service to the internet from the IP address of the node at the specified port number, which is in the range 30000-32767.

      • LoadBalancer: creates a load balancer assigned to a fixed IP address in the cloud if the cloud provider supports it. For clusters deployed on Linode, this is the responsibility of the Linode’s Cloud Controller Manager (CCM), which will create NodeBalancers for each of your LoadBalancer services. This is the best way to expose your cluster to the internet.

      • ExternalName: maps the Service to a DNS name by returning a CNAME record redirect. ExternalName is good for directing traffic to outside resources, such as a database hosted on another cloud.

      Terraform

      Terraform by HashiCorp is a software tool that allows you to represent your Linode instances and other resources with declarative code inside configuration files, instead of manually creating those resources via the Linode Manager or API. This practice is referred to as Infrastructure as Code, and Terraform is a popular example of this methodology.

      Volumes

      A Volume in Kubernetes is a way to share file storage between containers in a Pod. Kubernetes Volumes differ from Docker volumes because they exist inside the Pod rather than inside the container.

      Worker Nodes

      Worker nodes in a Kubernetes cluster are servers that run your applications’ Pods. The number of nodes in your cluster is determined by the cluster administrator.

      More Information

      You may wish to consult the following resources for additional information on this topic. While these are provided in the hope that they will be useful, please note that we cannot vouch for the accuracy or timeliness of externally hosted materials.

      Find answers, ask questions, and help others.

      This guide is published under a CC BY-ND 4.0 license.



      Source link

      Kubernetes Reference Guide


      Updated by Linode Contributed by Linode

      This is a reference for common Kubernetes terminology.

      Calico

      Calico is an implementation of Kubernetes’ networking model, and it served as the original reference for the Kubernetes NetworkPolicy API during its development. Calico also provides advanced policy enforcement capabilities that extend beyond Kubernetes’ NetworkPolicy API, and these can be used by administrators alongside that API. Calico uses BGP to distribute routes for Kubernetes Pods, without the need for overlays.

      Cluster

      A group of servers containing at least one master node and one or more worker nodes.

      Container

      Similar to virtual machines, containers are isolated runtimes that you can run your applications and services inside. Containers consume fewer resources than virtual machines, as they do not attempt to emulate a full operating system running on dedicated hardware. Instead, containers only bundle the files, environment variables, and libraries needed by the applications they run, and they share the other resources of the operating system that hosts them.

      Containerization

      Containerization is a software architecture practice that organizes applications and their dependencies in containers. Containerizing an application requires a base image that can be used to create an instance of a container. Once an application’s image exists, you can push it to a centralized container registry. Docker, Kubernetes, and other orchestration tools can download images from a registry to deploy container instances.

      Container Storage Interface

      The Container Storage Interface (CSI) specification provides a common storage interface for container orchestrators like Kubernetes (and others, like Mesos). The interface is used by an orchestrator to attach storage volumes to containers and to manage the lifecycle of those volumes.

      The objective of this specification is to allow cloud computing platforms to develop a single storage plugin that works with any container orchestrator. Linode has authored a CSI driver for Linode’s Block Storage service, which makes Block Storage Volumes available to your containers.

      Controller

      A Kubernetes Controller is a control loop that continuously watches the Kubernetes API and tries to manage the desired state of certain aspects of the cluster. Examples of different Controllers include:

      • ReplicaSets, which manage the number of running instances of a particular Pod.
      • Deployments, which manage the number of running instances of a particular Pod and can perform upgrades of Pods to new versions.
      • Jobs, which manage Pods that perform one-off tasks.

      Control Plane

      kube-apiserver, kube-controller-manager, kube-scheduler, and etcd form what is known as the Control Plane of a Kubernetes cluster. The Control Plane is responsible for keeping a record of the state of a cluster, making decisions about the cluster, and pushing the cluster towards new desired states.

      Deployment

      A Deployment can manage a ReplicaSet, so it shares the ability to keep a defined number of replica Pods up and running. A Deployment can also update those Pods to resemble the desired state by means of rolling updates. For example, if you wanted to update a container image to a newer version, you would create a Deployment, and the Controller would update the container images one by one until the desired state is achieved. This ensures that there is no downtime when updating or altering your Pods.

      Docker

      Docker is a tool that allows quick deployment of apps in containers using operating system level virtualization. While Kubernetes supports several container runtimes, Docker is a very popular option.

      Dockerfile

      A Dockerfile contains all commands, in their required order of execution, needed to build a given Docker image. For example, a Dockerfile might contain instructions for:

      • Installing a specific operating system referencing another image,
      • Installing an application’s dependencies, and
      • Executing configuration commands in the running container.

      Docker Hub

      Docker Hub is a centralized container image registry that can host your images and make them available for sharing and deployment. You can also find and use official Docker images and vendor specific images. When combined with a remote version control service, like GitHub, Docker Hub can automate the build process for images and can trigger actions for further automation with other services and tooling.

      etcd

      etcd is a highly available key-value store that provides the backend database for Kubernetes.

      Flannel

      Flannel is a networking overlay that meets the functionality of the Kubernetes. Flannel supplies a layer 3 network fabric and is relatively easy to set up.

      Helm

      Helm is a tool that assists with installing and managing applications on Kubernetes clusters. It is often referred to as “the package manager for Kubernetes,” and it provides functions that are similar to a package manager for an operating system.

      Helm Charts

      The software packaging format for Helm. A Helm chart specifies a file and directory structure for packaging your Kubernetes manifests.

      Helm Client

      The Helm client software issues commands to your cluster that can install new applications, upgrade them, and delete them. You run the client software on your computer, in your CI/CD environment, or anywhere else you’d like.

      Helm Tiller

      A server component that runs on your cluster and receives commands from the Helm client software. Tiller is responsible for directly interacting with the Kubernetes API (which the client software does not do). Tiller maintains the state for your Helm releases.

      Job

      A Job is a Controller which manages Pods created for a single or a set of tasks. This is handy if you need to create a Pod that performs a single function, or calculates a value. The deletion of the Job will delete the Pod.

      kube-apiserver

      The kube-apiserver is the front end for the Kubernetes API server. Validates and configures data for Kubernetes’ API objects including Pods, Services, Deployments, and more.

      kube-controller-manager

      The kube-controller-manager is a daemon that manages the Kubernetes control loop. It watches the shared state of the cluster through the Kubernetes API server.

      kube-proxy

      The kube-proxy is a networking proxy that proxies the UDP, TCP, and SCTP networking of each node, and provides load balancing. This is only used to connect to Services.

      kube-scheduler

      The kube-scheduler is a function that looks for newly created Pods that have no nodes. kube-scheduler assigns Pods to a nodes based on a host of requirements.

      kubeadm

      kubeadm is a cloud provider-agnostic tool that automates many of the tasks required to get a cluster up and running. Users of kubeadm can run a few simple commands on individual servers to turn them into a Kubernetes cluster consisting of a master node and worker nodes.

      kubectl

      kubectl is a command line tool used to interact with the Kubernetes cluster. It offers a host of features, including:

      • Creating, stopping, and deleting resources
      • Describing active resources
      • Auto scaling resources.

      kubelet

      kubelet is an agent that receives descriptions of the desired state of a Pod from the API server and ensures the Pod is healthy and running on its node.

      Kubernetes

      Kubernetes, often referred to as “k8s”, is an open source container orchestration system that helps deploy and manage containerized applications. Developed by Google starting in 2014 and written in the Go language, Kubernetes is quickly becoming the standard way to architect horizontally-scalable applications.

      Kubernetes Manifests

      Files, often written in YAML, used to create, modify, and delete Kubernetes resources such as Pods, Deployments, and Services.

      Linode Cloud Controller Manager

      The Linode Cloud Controller Manager (CCM) creates a fully supported Kubernetes experience on Linode:

      • Linode NodeBalancers are automatically deployed when a Kubernetes Service of type “LoadBalancer” is deployed. This is the most reliable way to allow services running in your cluster to be reachable from the Internet.

      • Linode hostnames and network addresses (private/public IPs) are automatically associated with their corresponding Kubernetes resources, forming the basis for a variety of Kubernetes features.

      • Node resources are put into the correct state when Linodes are shut down, allowing Pods to be appropriately rescheduled.

      • Nodes are annotated with the Linode region, which is the basis for scheduling based on failure domains.

      Linode k8s-alpha CLI

      The Linode k8s-alpha CLI is a plugin for the Linode CLI that offers quick, single-command deployments of Kubernetes clusters on your Linode account.

      Linode NodeBalancer

      NodeBalancers are highly-available, managed, cloud based “load balancers as a service”. They intelligently route incoming requests to backend Linodes to help your application cope with load, and to increase your application’s availability.

      Master Server

      The Kubernetes Master is normally a separate server in a Kubernetes cluster responsible for maintaining the desired state of the cluster. It does this by telling the nodes how many instances of your application it should run and where.

      Namespaces

      Namespaces are virtual clusters that exist within the Kubernetes cluster that help to group and organize Kubernetes API objects. Every cluster has at least three Namespaces: default, kube-system, and kube-public. When interacting with the cluster it is important to know which Namespace the object you are looking for is in, as many commands will default to only showing you what exists in the default Namespace. Resources created without an explicit Namespace will be added to the default Namespace.

      Orchestration

      Orchestration is the automated configuration, coordination, and management of computer systems, software, middleware, and services. It takes advantage of automated tasks to execute processes. The subject of orchestration is often discussed in reference to lifecycle management for containers, a practice known as container orchestration.

      Pod

      A Pod is the smallest deployable unit of computing in the Kubernetes architecture. A Pod is a group of one or more containers with shared resources and a specification for how to run these containers. Each Pod has its own IP address in the cluster. Pods are “mortal,” which means that they are created and destroyed depending on the needs of the application

      Rancher

      Rancher is a web application that provides a GUI interface for cluster creation and for the management of clusters. Rancher also provides easy interfaces for deploying and scaling apps on your clusters, and it has a built-in catalog of curated apps to choose from.

      ReplicaSet

      A ReplicaSet is one of the Controllers responsible for keeping a given number of replica Pods running. If one Pod goes down in a ReplicaSet, another will be created to replace it. In this way, Kubernetes is self-healing. However, for most use cases it is recommended to use a Deployment instead of a ReplicaSet.

      REST

      REST stands for REpresentational State Transfer. It is an architectural style for network based software that requires stateless, cacheable, client-server communication via a uniform interface between components. The HTTP protocol is most often used in RESTful applications.

      Services

      Services group identical Pods together to provide a consistent means of accessing them. Each service is given an IP address and a corresponding DNS entry. Services exist across nodes. There are four types of Services:

      • ClusterIP: exposes the Service internally to the cluster; this is the default type of Service.

      • NodePort: exposes the Service to the internet from the IP address of the node at the specified port number, which is in the range 30000-32767.

      • LoadBalancer: creates a load balancer assigned to a fixed IP address in the cloud if the cloud provider supports it. For clusters deployed on Linode, this is the responsibility of the Linode’s Cloud Controller Manager (CCM), which will create NodeBalancers for each of your LoadBalancer services. This is the best way to expose your cluster to the internet.

      • ExternalName: maps the Service to a DNS name by returning a CNAME record redirect. ExternalName is good for directing traffic to outside resources, such as a database hosted on another cloud.

      Terraform

      Terraform by HashiCorp is a software tool that allows you to represent your Linode instances and other resources with declarative code inside configuration files, instead of manually creating those resources via the Linode Manager or API. This practice is referred to as Infrastructure as Code, and Terraform is a popular example of this methodology.

      Volumes

      A Volume in Kubernetes is a way to share file storage between containers in a Pod. Kubernetes Volumes differ from Docker volumes because they exist inside the Pod rather than inside the container.

      Worker Nodes

      Worker nodes in a Kubernetes cluster are servers that run your applications’ Pods. The number of nodes in your cluster is determined by the cluster administrator.

      More Information

      You may wish to consult the following resources for additional information on this topic. While these are provided in the hope that they will be useful, please note that we cannot vouch for the accuracy or timeliness of externally hosted materials.

      Find answers, ask questions, and help others.

      This guide is published under a CC BY-ND 4.0 license.



      Source link