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      Web Accessibility Guide for Designers (6 Key Tips)


      As a website designer, you play a significant role in a website’s accessibility and inclusiveness.  Many design elements, from typography to media, can create barriers for those with disabilities. With so many items that need to be addressed, it may feel like an impossible task.

      Fortunately, there’s a lot of guidance available for designing a website that’s accessible to all. By giving careful attention to a few key areas, you should be able to include accessibility in your design process without breaking stride.

      In this guide, we’ll introduce you to the concept of web accessibility and its importance. Then we’ll cover six key areas to keep in mind when designing an accessible website. Let’s get started!

      An Introduction to Web Accessibility

      Web accessibility means that all aspects of a website are usable by people with disabilities. Without it, much of the information on the internet would be inaccessible to a large percentage of the population. For online business owners, this would also equate to losing out on potential sales.

      As of 2019, nearly 60% of the United States population with disabilities lived in a home with internet access. That translates to a lot of people who rely on accessible design to use the web fully. People with disabilities also tend to adopt technology at lower rates, meaning they may not have an option for which device to use when accessing a website.

      The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) developed the Web Accessibility Content Guidelines (WACG) to provide a set of standards to developers, designers, and others responsible for creating and maintaining content on the web.

      The accessibility guidelines are organized into four principles, sometimes referred to by the acronym POUR:

      1. Perceivable: Website components must be presented in a way that users can perceive, regardless of disability.
      2. Operable: Navigation and operation must not require input actions that a user cannot perform.
      3. Understandable: Users must understand how to use and navigate a website and the content on it.
      4. Robust: Content needs to be compatible with current and future assistive technology.

      These principles can seem overwhelming and even somewhat vague. However, there are concrete steps you can take to ensure that your website is accessible to everyone.

      Get an Inclusive Design You’re Proud Of

      Our designers will create a gorgeous website for your brand with usability guidelines and ADA compliance in mind. No accessibility problems here!

      Web Accessibility Guide for Designers (6 Key Tips)

      Having touched on how vital web accessibility is, let’s look at six areas to consider when designing an accessible website.

      1. Make Visual Design Elements Readable

      Typography is a fun area to showcase your creative flair, but the primary purpose of your website’s text is to convey information. There are a few guidelines to be mindful of when working with typography.

      First, you’ll want to think about the contrast between the text and the background. Contrast is expressed as a ratio, and per WCAG guidelines, the minimum contrast is 4.5:1 for normal text and 3:1 for large text.

      There are several tools you can use to test color combinations. WebAIM’s Contrast Checker is one of these.

      WebAIM’s contrast checker tool.

      Line height and letter spacing also come into play where accessibility is concerned. To keep text readable, W3C provides the following guidance:

      • Line height must be at least 1.5 times the font size.
      • Spacing between paragraphs should be two times the font size.
      • Spacing between letters must be at least .12 times the font size.
      • Word space should be at least .16 times the font size.

      Graphs are another way to present a lot of information in an easily understood format. However, if you’re only differentiating the elements by color, you could be shortchanging many people. In fact, there are about 3 million colorblind people worldwide who could be struggling with your content.

      To be certain visual elements are understandable, consider using patterns as well as color in your graphs. When selecting designs, we recommend choosing ones that are different enough from each other. For example, lines or dots are easily discerned, whereas lines of varying thickness may not be.

      2. Organize Content for Easy Understanding

      No matter what type of website you’re designing, chances are there is a lot of text. You can improve accessibility by structuring content in a way that’s easy to skim and understand.

      First, most users will appreciate you breaking your text up into short paragraphs. People often aren’t reading deeply on the web, and shorter sections are easier to scan through.

      Headings are also crucial to scannability. Each heading should accurately describe the content beneath it and follow a logical hierarchy. This means using larger headings first and progressively smaller ones as you cover more specific information.

      Using appropriate markup for your headings can make it easier for screen readers to read and navigate your content. In HyperText Markup Language (HTML), you’ll use tags <h1> down to <h6> to create hierarchical headings to break up your text.

      Headings arranged hierarchically from one to six.

      When adding links to your content, be sure the anchor text is descriptive enough that readers will know where clicking on it will take them. Also, it’s smart to mention if the link will open in a new window. A window opening unexpectedly can cause issues for screen readers and confuse the user.

      You should also let your users skip through the content without using a scroll wheel or repeatedly pressing an arrow key. This can be as simple as including a table of contents at the start of a blog post. You can also have a button that skips right to the main content of the page.

      A ‘skip to main content’ button.

      Next, we’ll explore some ways you can make interacting with your website easier.

      3. Keep User Interface (UI) Elements Intuitive and Device-Independent

      User Interface (UI) elements are anything on a website that visitors need to interact with to navigate, and they play a major role in the overall User Experience (UX). UI elements can include scrollbars, dropdown menus, and notifications.

      For a website to be considered accessible, people using different devices need to be able to interact with these UI elements successfully. This means that device-independent design is crucial.

      For example, some people are only able to use keyboards. To make it possible for them to navigate a webpage, you can include focus indicators to highlight buttons, links, and text fields when a user tabs through a page.

      Anything on your website that can be interacted with should have a corresponding focus indicator. The appearance can vary from one browser to another, but they typically show up as a blue or white outline depending on the background color.

      A focus indicator on the Google search page.

      When adding focus indicators, you’ll need to define tab order. This order should be similar to how you read: top to bottom and left to right. You can test this by tabbing through your site.

      Try to keep navigation and other menus in a consistent order throughout the website. These elements should also appear in roughly the same locations on each page because it makes them easier to memorize and quicker to use.

      Touch targets are the areas a user taps when using a touchscreen device. When defining touch targets, you’ll want to be sure they’re large enough to be easily tapped by anyone. For example, people with neuromuscular disorders may lack the fine motor control needed to interact with a tiny target.

      However, you also don’t want to create targets so large that they overlap with nearby elements. Tapping one button when you were aiming for another is enough to frustrate anybody.

      Some users rely heavily on keyboard shortcuts. While you can define shortcuts for your website, it may not be the best course of action. Keyboard shortcuts are not standardized across the web, and any you create may conflict with the device someone is using. If you decide to add custom shortcuts, be sure to make this clear and provide guidance for using them.

      There are some types of interactions that aren’t available on every device. For example, while pinch-to-zoom is convenient for mobile phones, it’s impossible on any computer without a touchscreen. Be sure content isn’t locked behind actions your users may not be able to perform. Provide multiple avenues to your information.

      UX is a highly involved area of web design with a lot of moving parts. Therefore, you might consider adding a section to your style guide to help maintain consistency for all UI elements across your website.

      4. Make Input Controls User-Friendly

      Input controls are a subset of UI elements intended to accept input from a user. Examples include text fields, checkboxes, and radio buttons.

      Forms can be tricky to design with accessibility in mind, but there are some guidelines to follow. You can start by labeling each field of your form. You might also include some example text in the field itself.

      A lead generation form with labels and example text.

      When laying out forms, we suggest using a vertical structure and placing each field on its own line. This makes navigating the form easier for keyboard-only users. On a related note, ensure that focus indicators are placed throughout the form.

      You might break long forms into multiple sections as they can be overwhelming. You could also add a progress bar for people to know where they are in the process; this is likely to be appreciated by your users.

      Finally, be sure to provide error messages that are clear and easy to understand. If possible, don’t clear the entire form when an error is made. It’s a good idea to include instructions for how to fix the mistake as well.

      5. Include Multiple Ways to Enjoy Media

      Media can add a lot to a website, but there are accessibility issues to be mindful of. Fortunately, you can ensure that any media you use is enjoyed by everyone.

      First, some types of media are best avoided altogether. Flashing animation or pop-ups can potentially trigger seizures in some people. You may also want to skip scrolling text or animated content that can’t be paused. It can be difficult or even impossible for some users to absorb.

      If you feel the need to include scrolling or animation, there are ways to make these elements more accessible. Be sure text moves slowly enough that visitors can read it easily. In addition, make it possible for users to pause the content and be clear about how to do so.

      When you create video content for your website, you can include closed captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. You should also add a text transcript of the video’s content for those using a screen reader.

      Visitors who use screen readers can sometimes have a difficult time with images on a site as well. To make it possible for these people to see what is happening in a picture, you can include alt text.

      Adding alt text to an image of a person playing guitar.

      Alt text is a description intended to show up when an image fails to load. However, screen readers also speak this text, so those with visual impairments don’t miss out.

      When you’re writing alt text, you’ll want to be as descriptive as possible. You can base your description on what is featured in the image and the context of the surrounding content. Also, there’s no need to include the words “Picture of…” at the start of your alt text, as the screen reader will add that automatically.

      6. Perform User Research and Testing

      User research and testing probably aren’t as exciting to you as the design process, but they’re crucial for nailing accessibility. User research is best done early in the process to get a handle on who your users are and what they expect from you. You can do testing throughout the design process to help keep you heading in the right direction.

      Thorough research ensures that none of your users will fall through the cracks and will help you develop a plan for designing your website. You might use focus groups or surveys to determine what users need from your website and how they intend to use it.

      You’ll likely want to do some testing throughout the site-building process. You might try A/B testing at the wireframing stage when there’s still time to pivot. Once your site goes live, you could observe people using your website and ask for their thoughts as they accomplish specific tasks.

      During research and testing, it’s best to gather a diverse group of participants. Including those of all abilities gives you a better chance of designing a site that works for everyone.

      You can also perform testing yourself, such as trying to navigate your website using only your keyboard. For other elements of accessibility, you might want to try a plugin such as WP Accessibility.

      The WP Accessibility plugin.

      This plugin is free to use. It can help you correct a variety of accessibility issues.

      DreamHost Takes Inclusivity Seriously

      We regularly report on diversity, accessibility, and representation in the tech industry. Subscribe to our monthly newsletter so you never miss an article.

      Let’s Make Accessibility Standard

      Focusing on accessibility during the design process can result in a website that’s accessible to everyone. While it may seem like a lot to keep track of, the payoff is well worth the extra effort.

      Keep the following in mind when you’re designing your website:

      1. Make visual design elements readable.
      2. Organize web content for easy understanding.
      3. Keep User Interface (UI) elements intuitive and device-independent.
      4. Make input controls user-friendly.
      5. Include multiple ways to enjoy media.
      6. Perform user research and accessibility testing.

      Building an accessible website is a lot easier with the right web host in your corner. DreamHost’s Shared Unlimited hosting can ensure that you get off to a great start with a fast and reliable website!



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      Be the Boss of Your Base: Tips to Master MongoDB Like a Pro


      Video

      About the Talk

      MongoDB developer advocates share best practices on when to use relational databases, and top tips and tricks for getting the most out of the latest release of MongoDB.

      Resources

      Slides
      MongoDB Developer Hub
      MongoDB Community Forums

      Presenters

      Ado Kukic, Lead Developer Advocate, MongoDB
      Ado is a full-stack software engineer, international speaker, and lead developer advocacy at MongoDB, as well as Google Developer Expert for Web Technologies. He spends most of his time giving talks at conferences and meetups, mentoring and running workshops, and creating online content to help technology professionals.

      Adrienne Tacke, Senior Developer Advocate, MongoDB
      Currently a Senior Developer Advocate for MongoDB, Adrienne Tacke is a Filipina software engineer, speaker, published author of the book Coding for Kids: Python, as well as LinkedIn Learning instructor who specializes in Cloud Development courses.

      Perhaps most important, however, is that she spends way too much money on desserts and ungodly amounts of time playing Cyberpunk 2077.



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      How to Fix the 500 Internal Server Error in WordPress (10 Tips)


      Seeing a 500 internal server error where your website should be is enough to throw anyone into a panic. When your website goes down, you lose out on potential traffic and sales. If it’s offline for a while, it can also negatively impact your Search Engine Optimization (SEO) efforts.

      Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to go about fixing this error. Many of these solutions are fairly straightforward, and you don’t need a lot of technical know-how to start troubleshooting.

      In this guide, we’ll cover what the 500 internal server error in WordPress is and discuss some potential causes. Then we’ll give you 10 tips to help you get your website back in working order.

      1. Back up your website.
      2. Try reloading the page.
      3. Clear your browser cache.
      4. Access your error logs.
      5. Check for the “Error Establishing a Database Connection.”
      6. Look for permission errors.
      7. Increase your PHP memory limit.
      8. Check for problems with your .htaccess file.
      9. Look for coding or syntax errors in your CGI/Perl script.
      10. Ask your web host about potential server issues.

      Let’s get started!

      Dealing with the WordPress Internal Server Error?

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      What Is the 500 Internal Server Error?

      The 500 internal server error is frustratingly nonspecific. When the error occurs, you usually don’t get many details about it. In fact, you might not receive any information at all.

      An example of a 500 internal server error screen.

      The 500 error is a generic issue that isn’t specific to WordPress. Chances are you’ve seen it before during your internet explorations. Despite the name, it doesn’t necessarily mean that something is wrong with your server. It could be an issue with your website or browser.

      If you do see this error on your site, you’ll want to get it fixed as quickly as possible. A 500 error can impact your SEO if allowed to linger. If your site is crawled while it’s offline, there’s a chance that Google may interpret the error as an issue with your website.

      This error can also hurt your User Experience (UX) and give visitors the impression that you’re unprofessional. Not only can a poor UX affect the way Google ranks your site, but it can cause you to lose customers as well. After all, you can’t do business if your site isn’t accessible.

      A wide variety of situations can result in the 500 error, making it a bit of a chore to sort out. Potential causes of the 500 internal server error in WordPress include:

      • Plugin compatibility issues
      • Exhausted PHP memory limit
      • Corrupted files
      • Coding or syntax errors

      The fact that the error message itself tends to be vague doesn’t help. Fortunately, you can solve many of these issues on your own with a bit of know-how.

      Variations on the 500 Internal Server Error

      Depending on your operating system, browser, and the cause of the error, there are variations in how it will appear. For example, if a database connection can’t be established, you might see something like this:

      An error establishing a database connection message.

      A plain white screen, sometimes referred to as the White Screen of Death (WSoD), can indicate a 500 internal server error.

      A blank browser window due to a 500 error.

      Also, many site owners have the option to customize their 500 error messages. So you might see this error in many different forms.

      How to Fix the 500 Internal Server Error in WordPress (10 Tips)

      Now that you’ve had an introduction to the 500 internal server error, it’s time to discuss how to resolve it. Let’s take a look at ten tips you can use to fix this issue in WordPress.

      1. Back up your website.

      Before tinkering under the hood, it’s always smart to make a backup of your website. If DreamHost hosts your site, you can take advantage of our one-click backup feature. You can also create a manual backup if you prefer.

      To make a complete backup, you’ll need to save copies of your WordPress files as well as your databases. You can back up your site’s files using a Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP) client such as FileZilla.

      Once you’re connected to your server, navigate to the WordPress files you want to save. These files include the WordPress core installation, plugins, themes, images, and more. To save the files, simply right-click on them and select Download.

      How to download WordPress files via SFTP.

      Now you’ll need to back up your database, which you can do by logging into phpMyAdmin. Select the database you want to download from the left-hand panel, and then click on the Export tab.

      You’ll then need to choose between a “Quick” or a “Custom” export. The Quick export will likely work just fine unless you need to manage more advanced options.

      Options for downloading a WordPress database using phpMyAdmin.

      Click on the Go button, and your download should start. Once your website is safely backed up, you can get to work on fixing that 500 error.

      2. Try reloading the page.

      Let’s start with the best-case scenario. Some situations that cause a 500 internal error clear up on their own within a few minutes. For example, if you’ve just made changes to a plugin or theme, or if your host is experiencing unusually heavy traffic, you may see a server error. If this is true in your case, you’re in luck, as a simple page reload should get things back to normal.

      Therefore, the first thing to try is simply waiting a minute or two, during which the error will hopefully resolve itself. Then you can try reloading the page by pressing F5 or (command + R if you’re using a Mac).

      3. Clear your browser cache.

      Another potential server error fix that’s quick and easy is clearing your browser cache. It’s possible the cache became corrupted, which would cause problems when attempting to access websites.

      First, you might check Down For Everyone Or Just Me. This will determine whether there’s a widespread problem or you’re the only one experiencing difficulties.

      Amazon.com’s status on Down for Everyone or Just Me.

      If you’re alone in your 500 error frustration, the problem may be your browser. Try accessing your site from a different browser. If an alternative works, it’s a sign that the issue is with your cache.

      In Google Chrome, you can clear your cache by pressing Ctrl + Shift + Delete. Alternatively, you can click on the three vertical dots in the top-right corner, followed by More tools > Clear browsing data.

      Options for clearing the browser cache in Chrome.

      Be sure to check the Cached images and files box. Then click on the Clear data button.

      In Firefox, you can clear the cache using the Ctrl + Shift + Delete keyboard shortcut. This will open the Clear Recent History window. In the Time range to clear drop-down menu, select Everything. Check the Cache box, and then click on OK.

      Options for clearing browser data in Firefox.

      In Safari, you can navigate to the History menu item and choose Clear History. Keep in mind that this will delete everything, including cookies and visited pages.

      How to clear the browser cache in Safari.

      Once you’ve cleared your browser cache, you can attempt to access your website again. If you’re still seeing the 500 internal server error, it’s time to move on to more involved fixes.

      4. Access your error logs.

      Your site’s error logs may provide insight into what’s causing the 500 error. Depending on your host, these logs may be cycled quite often, so you’ll want to take a look as soon as possible.

      You can check your error logs by accessing your site’s files via SFTP and looking for the /logs directory. Next, select the site that’s experiencing the error. You may see several directories at this point. You’ll want to check the one with the most recent date.

      Error and access log files accessed via FileZilla.

      You can view the log by downloading it and opening it with your preferred text editor. Hopefully, your error logs will provide you with some additional context for the 500 error.

      Another option is to enable the WordPress debug log. You can do this by connecting to your site via SFTP and opening your wp-config.php file. Within it, look for the following line:

      define('WP_DEBUG', false);

      Once you find it, replace it with the following:

      define( 'WP_DEBUG', true );
      
      define( 'WP_DEBUG_DISPLAY', false );
      
      define( 'WP_DEBUG_LOG', true );

      This will create a debug.log file, which you can find under the /wp-content/ directory. Just be sure to change the WP_DEBUG value back to “false” when you’re done troubleshooting.

      5. Check for the ‘Error Establishing a Database Connection.’

      If there’s been a problem establishing a database connection, not only will your site be offline for visitors, but you won’t be able to access the WordPress admin dashboard either. There are a few possible causes of this:

      • Incorrect database login credentials
      • A corrupted WordPress database
      • A corrupted WordPress installation file

      Let’s start with incorrect login credentials, as this is a common cause of the database connection error. If you’re a DreamHost user, you can find your database credentials in your panel. However, if you use a different host, you’ll likely follow a similar procedure.

      Navigate to MySQL Databases and find the one that corresponds to your website under the Database(s) on this server section. Here, you’ll find your database name under the Database heading. The username is listed under the Users Access column.

      Alt-text: Where to find your MySQL username in DreamPanel.

      To find the password, click on the username. On the next screen, scroll down and click on the Show button next to the password field.

      How to find your database password in DreamPanel.

      Next, you’ll compare these credentials to those in your wp-config.php file. You can access this file in your site’s main directory via SFTP. Once you have the file downloaded, open it and verify that the information under MySQL Settings matches what you found in your panel.

      Checking MySQL settings in the wpconfig.php file.

      Next, if your database is corrupted, you can quickly repair it through phpMyAdmin. Log in and click on your database in the left panel. Select all of the tables in the database, and then choose the Repair table option from the drop-down menu.

      Repairing a database in phpMyAdmin.

      Finally, let’s look at how to handle a corrupted WordPress installation file. Start by downloading a new copy of WordPress and unzipping the file. You’ll need to delete the wp-content folder and the wp-config-sample.php file.

      Deleting files from a new WordPress installation.

      Upload the rest of the files to your site via SFTP, overwriting any existing ones. You now have a brand new, uncorrupted WordPress installation. You’ll also want to clear your browser cache before checking your website again.

      6. Look for permission errors.

      If any of your files have permissions set incorrectly, you may see the 500 internal server error as a result. Again, you can check and change these permissions using SFTP.

      Right-click on any file and select File permissions to open a new dialogue window. In this window, you can check and, if necessary, set new permissions for the file.

      Checking and updating file permissions using FileZilla.

      Typically, you’ll want to set files to “644” and directories and executables to “755”. However, you may want to check with your host if you’re unsure about the correct values.

      7. Increase your PHP memory limit.

      Another reason you might see the 500 internal server error is if you’ve exceeded your server’s PHP memory limit. There are several ways to increase your limit, and they all involve using SFTP.

      Before you try increasing your memory limit, you may want to start by seeing what it’s currently set to. You can do this through the WordPress admin dashboard. Keep in mind that, with some variations of the 500 error, you won’t be able to access the dashboard. If that’s the case, you may have to skip this step.

      From your WordPress dashboard, navigate to Tools > Site Health. Click on Info at the top of the screen, and scroll down to the Server section. You should see your PHP memory limit there.

      How to check your WordPress site’s PHP memory limit.

      To increase the PHP memory limit, there are a few files you can edit. One is your .htaccess file, typically located in your site’s root directory. Open the file and add the following code:

      php_value memory_limit xxxM

      You can replace the “xxx” with your desired amount of memory. Usually, 256M is plenty.

      You can also increase your memory limit by editing your php.ini file. You should be able to find this file in your root directory. If not, you can go ahead and create one. Add or update its code to the following:

      memory_limit = xxxM

      Another option is to add in the following code at the top of your wp-config.php file:

      define('WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', 'xxxM');

      If this resolves the 500 error, your next task will be to figure out what is causing the memory limit exhaustion. It could be a problematic plugin or theme. You might consider reaching out to your host for help on finding the exact server diagnostics.

      8. Check for problems with your .htaccess file.

      Your .htaccess file is one of the core WordPress files. It contains rules for your server, so it could contribute to a 500 internal server error.

      If your .htaccess file has become corrupted, you’ll want to go ahead and create a fresh one. Start by logging into your site via SFTP and finding your .htaccess file. Rename the file to .htaccess_old.

      Renaming a file in FileZilla.

      Now, create a new .htaccess file in your text editor and paste in the following:

      # BEGIN WordPress
      
      RewriteEngine On
      
      RewriteRule .* - [E=HTTP_AUTHORIZATION:%{HTTP:Authorization}]
      
      RewriteBase /
      
      RewriteRule ^index.php$ - [L]
      
      RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
      
      RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
      
      RewriteRule . /index.php [L]
      
      # END WordPress

      Go ahead and upload your newly created .htaccess file. Then refresh your site in your browser, and check to see whether the error message is showing.

      9. Look for coding or syntax errors in your CGI/Perl script.

      If you’re running Common Gateway Interface (CGI) scripts, any coding errors you’ve made could result in a 500 error. To unearth potential issues with your CGI scripts, log into your site using Secure Shell Access (SSH).

      Once you’ve logged in, you can troubleshoot your CGI with this command:

      [server]$ ./cgi_name.cgi

      The terminal should return a general error message and the line number the culprit is located on. From there, you can work your coding magic!

      When working with CGI, there are a few best practices to keep in mind to avoid problems. First, it’s wise to use a plain text editor to ensure that you maintain ASCII format. When you upload scripts, you should also be able to select ASCII mode in your FTP client.

      Changing the transfer type option in FileZilla.

      Finally, if necessary, upload to the cgi-bin directory on your server. Then you can double-check your files’ permissions once you have them uploaded.

      10. Ask your web host about potential server issues.

      If all else fails, there may be a server issue, which only your host can confirm. Unfortunately, if your host’s server is experiencing a problem, you may have to wait out some website downtime.

      If you’re a DreamHost client, you can check the DreamHost Status page. This resource provides you with information on all of our services.

      The DreamHost status page.

      If you run into any problems while trying to repair the 500 internal server error, you can always reach out to our tech support team. They’re ready and waiting to lend you a hand! If you’ve followed the tips in this guide, you’ll have plenty of valuable information for the technician.

      Ready to Dive into Your Error Log?

      Whether you need help with file permission, identifying a hidden file, or dealing with a faulty plugin, we can help! Subscribe to our monthly digest so you never miss an article.

      Let’s Get Your WordPress Website Back on Track

      While having to sort out a 500 internal server error isn’t exactly fun, it’s also not as painful as you might imagine. With a little patience and the tips we’ve provided, you should be able to make some progress on getting your website back online.

      You can start small by refreshing your page and clearing your browser cache. Then you might want to move onto more involved fixes, such as increasing your PHP memory limit. If you’re not able to resolve the error on your own, DreamHost’s award-winning tech support is just a click away.

      When you do run into errors, it’s easier to get back up and running when you have a reliable hosting provider. DreamPress is fast, secure WordPress hosting with powerful features to help make your site a success!



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