One place for hosting & domains

      6 Tips for Managing Cloud Security in the Modern Threat Landscape


      In a world where advanced cyberattacks are increasing in frequency and causing progressively higher costs for affected organizations, security is of the utmost importance no matter what infrastructure strategy your organization chooses. Despite longstanding myths, cloud environments are not inherently less secure than on-premise. With so many people migrating workloads to the cloud, however, it’s important to be aware of the threat landscape.

      Ten million cybersecurity attacks are reported to the Pentagon every day. In 2018, the number of records stolen or leaked from public cloud storage due to poor configuration totaled 70 million. And it’s estimated that the global cost of cybercrime by the end of 2019 will total $2 trillion.

      In response to the new cybersecurity reality, it is estimated that the annual spending on cloud security tools by 2023 will total $12.6 billion.

      Below, we’ll cover six ways to secure your cloud. This list is by no means exhaustive, but it will give you an idea of the security considerations that should be considered.

      Mitigating Cybersecurity Threats with Cloud Security Systems and Tools

      1. Intrusion Detection and 2. Intrusion Prevention Systems

      Intrusion detection systems (IDS) and intrusion prevention systems (IPS) are other important tools for ensuring your cloud environment is secure. These systems actively monitor the cloud network and systems for malevolent action and rule abuses. The action or rule may be reported directly to your administration team or collected and sent via a secure channel to an information management solution.

      IDSs have a known threat database that monitors all activity by users and the devices in your cloud environment to immediately spot threats such as SQL injection techniques, known malware worms with defined signatures and invalid secure certificates.

      IPS devices work at different layers and are often features of next-generation firewalls. These solutions are known for real-time deep packet inspection that alerts to potential threat behaviors. Sometimes these behaviors may be false alarms but are still important for learning what is and what is not a threat for your cloud environment.

      3. Isolating Your Cloud Environment for Various Users

      As you consider migrating to the cloud, understand how your provider will isolate your environment. In a multi-tenant cloud, with many organizations using the same technology resources (i.e. multi-tenant storage), you have segmented environments using vLAN’s and firewalls configured for least access. Any-any rules are the curse of all networks and are the first thing to look for when investigating the firewall rules. Much like leaving your front door wide-open all day and night, this firewall rule is an open policy of allowing traffic from any source to any destination over any port. A good rule of thumb is to block all ports and networks and then work up from there, testing each application and environment in a thorough manner. This may seem time consuming but going through a checklist of ports and connection scenarios from the setup is more efficient then doing the work of opening ports and allowing networks later.

      It’s also important to remember that while the provider owns the security of the cloud, customers own the security of their environments in the cloud. Assess tools and partners that allow you take better control. For instance, powerful tools such as VMware’s NSX support unified security policies and provide one place to manage firewall rules with its automation capabilities.

      4. User Entity Behavior Analytics

      Modern threat analysis employs User Entity Behavior Analytics (UEBA) and is invaluable to your organization in mitigating compromises of your cloud software. Through a machine learning model, UEBA analyzes data from reports and logs, different types of threat data and more to discern whether certain activities are a cyberattack.

      UEBA detects anomalies in the behavior patterns of your organization’s members, consultants and vendors. For example, the user account for a manager in the finance department would be flagged if it is downloading files from different parts of the world at different times of the day or is editing files from multiple time zones at the same time. In some instances, this might be legitimate behavior for this user, but the IT director should still give due diligence when the UEBA outs out this type of alert.  A quick call to confirm the behavior can prevent data loss or the loss of millions of dollars in revenue if the cloud environment has indeed been compromised.

      5. Role-Based Access Control

      All access should be given with caution and on an as-needed basis. Role-based access control (RBAC) allows employees to access only the information that allows them to do their jobs, restricting network access accordingly. RBAC tools allow you to designate what role the user plays—administrator, specialist, accountant, etc.—and add them to various groups. Permissions will change depending on user role and group membership. This is particularly useful for DevOps organizations where certain developers may need more access than others, as well as to specific cloud environments, but not others.

      When shifting to a RBAC, document the changes and specific user roles so that it can be put into a written policy. As you define the user roles, have conversations with employees to understand what they do. And be sure to communicate why implementing RBAC is good for the company. It not only helps you secure your company’s data and applications by managing employees, but third-party vendors, as well.

       6. Assess Third Party Risks

      As you transition to a cloud environment, vendor access should also be considered. Each vendor should have unique access rights and access control lists (ACL) in place that are native to the environments they connect from. Always remember that third party risk equates to enterprise risk. Infamous data breach incidents (remember Target in late 2013?) resulting from hackers’ infiltration of an enterprise via a third-party vendor should be enough of a warning to call into question how much you know about your vendors and the security controls they have in place. Third party risk management is considered a top priority for cybersecurity programs at a number of enterprises. Customers will not view your vendor as a separate company from your own in the event that something goes sideways and the information goes public. Protect your company’s reputation by protecting it from third party risks.

      Parting Thoughts

      The above tools are just several resources for ensuring your cloud environment is secure in multi-tenant or private cloud situations. As you consider the options for your cloud implementation, working with a trusted partner is a great way to meet your unique needs for your specific cloud environment.

      Explore INAP Managed Security.

      LEARN MORE

      Allan Williamson
      • Technical Account Manager


      READ MORE



      Source link

      3 Tips for Making Sure Your Brand’s Website Is Ready on Super Bowl Sunday


      Editor’s note: This article was originally published Jan. 31, 2020 on Adweek.com.

      There’s a hidden cost to even the most successful, buzz-generating Super Bowl ads: All that hard-earned (and expensively acquired) attention can easily bring a website to a standstill or break it altogether.

      We’re 12-plus years into the “second screen” era, and websites and applications during the Big Game are still frequently overwhelmed by the influx of visitors eagerly answering calls to action. Last year it was the CBS service streaming the game itself that failed to stay fully operational. In 2017, it was a lumber company taking a polarizing post-election stand. Advertisers in 2016’s game collectively witnessed website load time increases of 38%, with one retail tech company’s page crawling at 10-plus seconds.

      We pay a lot of attention to the ballooning per-second costs of these prized spots. We need to make more of a fuss around the opportunity costs of sites that buckle under the pressure of their brand’s own success.

      Note that a mere tenth of second slowdown on a website can take a heavy toll on conversion rates. Any length of time beyond that will send viewers back to their Twitter feeds. For first-time advertisers, this is an audience they may never see again. For big consumer brands, the expected hype can pivot quickly to reputation damage control. For ecommerce brands, downtime is a disaster that could mean millions in lost revenue.

      This year’s game may or may not yield another showcase example, but there’s a lesson here for marketers for brands of all sizes. Align your planned or unplanned viral triumphs with a tech infrastructure capable of rising to the occasion.

      To do so, lets briefly address two reasons why gaffes like this happen. The first, lightly technical explanation is that crashes and overloads occur when the number of requests and connections made by visitors outweigh the resources allocated to the website’s servers. The second, much-less-technical explanation is because executives didn’t sit down with their IT team early enough (or at all) to prevent explanation one.

      So, in that spirit of friendly interdepartmental alignment, here are a few pointers:

      Focus on the Site’s Purpose

      What’s the ideal user experience for those fleeting moments you hold a visitor’s attention? Answering this simple question will help your IT partners think holistically, identify potential bottlenecks in the system and allocate the right amount of resources to your web infrastructure.

      For instance, if you’re driving viewers to a video, your outbound bandwidth will need to pack a punch. If you’re an ecommerce site processing a high volume of transactions concurrently, you’ll need a lot of computer power and memory to handle dynamic requests. Image-heavy web assets may need compression tools. In any instance, your IT team will need to be ready with scalable contingencies. It’s why we see more enterprises adopting sophisticated multi-cloud and networking strategies that ensure key assets remain online through the peaks and valleys.

      Have the Cybersecurity Talk

      Mass publicity could very well make your website a target for bad actors. It’s the simple reality in an economy that’s increasingly digital. Ensure information security experts probe your site for vulnerabilities prior to major campaigns. Similarly, ask your IT team if your network can fend off denial of service attacks in which malicious actors send a deluge of fake traffic to your servers for the sole purpose of taking you offline. While these attacks are increasingly powerful and prevalent, gains in automation and machine learning mean they can be mitigated with the right tools.

      Don’t Forget the Dress Rehearsal

      If you’re planning a major campaign or your business is prone to seasonal traffic spikes, request that your tech partners run load tests. You’ll see firsthand what happens to your site performance when, for instance, your social team’s meme game finally strikes gold.

      Ultimately, website performance should be a 24/7 consideration. Ask your IT team about their monitoring tools in place and, more importantly, the processes and people at the ready to take any necessary action.

      Here’s hoping Sunday’s advertisers don’t squander their 15 minutes of fame with a 15-second page load. But if history does repeat itself, use it as fuel to ensure it doesn’t happen to you.

      Jennifer Curry
      • SVP, Global Cloud Services


      Jennifer Curry is SVP, Global Cloud Services. She is an operational and technology leader with over 17 years of experience in the IT industry, including seven years in the hosting/cloud market. READ MORE



      Source link

      From the Experts: 20 Great Blogging Tips for 2020


      There are a lot of A-list bloggers out there. We interviewed a handful of them to gather 20 tips that will help take your blog content to the next level this year.

      Just open your Instagram app, and it’s obvious: there are a lot of bloggers out there. Influencers sharing content on a myriad of topics — from paleo diets to patio furniture — seem to occupy every inch of internet real estate, peddling travel tips and gardening how-tos. With glossy photos and witty copy, it seems they’ve got it figured out. They’re real bloggers, right? 

      Is there even room for aspiring bloggers like you and me?

      Short answer? Yes! 

      Nearly 409 million people view more than 20 billion pages each month, according to WordPress. That’s a lot of opportunities. If you’re looking to enter the blogosphere (or increase the success of your already-established blog), you might think you need a lot of luck to make it happen. But there’s no need to buy lotto tickets or wish on shooting stars. You just need some expert advice. 

      Luckily, we’ve got that in spades. 

      We’ve done the legwork for you, talking with the web’s blogging elite and garnering their best tips. Consider these 20 tips an all-inclusive handbook to blogging success, chock-full of guidance from a handful of virtual mentors. These expert bloggers will instruct you on the keys to blogging success: how to get the ball rolling, create quality content, and stay dedicated, even in an evolving blogging environment.

      Are you ready to be a more professional blogger in 2020? Read on!

      Blog More with DreamPress

      Our automatic updates and strong security defenses take server management off your hands so you can focus on content creation.

      1. It’s About Time

      Before you even think of pursuing a blog — with the intent to make money blogging or simply as a hobby — you have to be real with yourself. Know your capabilities, as far as time and availability go.

      “Successful blogging requires time, dedication, and some strategic planning,” says Brittany Watson Jepsen of powerhouse DIY craft blog, The House That Lars Built. “I wouldn’t plan on doing it if you don’t have sufficient time to devote to it.”

      The House That Lars Built home page.

      According to a survey of more than a thousand bloggers, a typical blog post takes nearly four hours to create. The same study reveals that a large number of bloggers write outside of regular “work hours,” including on weekends and at night. Translation: bloggers are always on; blogging is their lifestyle, and it requires quality time to produce success.

      And writing blog posts is just the beginning; in addition to creating content, bloggers must optimize for search engines, make time for social media, market their content, network, and engage with readers.

      For design guru Emily Henderson, running a blog isn’t a back-burner endeavor, either. 

      “I had to make it a major priority or else it won’t get done,” the full-time blogger says. “Now I have a staff that helps keep it running on a daily basis, and we fill it with original content every single day.” 

      Not being fully committed is what separates amateur bloggers from the pros.

      “I think the main mistake I see in new bloggers is not being totally committed to what they’re doing,” says Jill Nystul, creator of phenom blog One Good Thing by Jillee. “You can’t do anything halfway in the blogging industry and expect to be successful. I see a lot of people start blogs, post a few things over a couple of months, and then wonder why they aren’t getting any traffic. Commit to a topic and a posting schedule and show your readers that you are dedicated to providing great content consistently.”

      2. Invest in Good Gear

      When you decide to start a blog, use whatever tools you have to get the ball rolling. But when you are financially able, your blog will benefit from getting your hands on some professional equipment.

      “The look of my blog definitely got a lot better when I invested in a real camera rather than using my phone which I totally did in the early days of my blog,” Nystul says. “And you don’t have to spend a fortune. We still use a Canon Rebel, and it works great.”

      A few other popular blogging tools: WordPress software, the Adobe Suite, a web hosting package, email marketing software, and useful plugins. The more professional and put together your blog, the more trust you’ll earn from readers.

      3. Your Mission (Should You Choose to Write It)

      You’ve got a burning passion for blogging, yes? Well, first, take a breath. 

      It’s crucial that you figure out a few things first, like what your blog is all about and what you want to do with it. Having a kick-butt blog is a good goal, but let’s dig deeper. 

      Ever heard of a mission statement? It’s commonly used by businesses to identify values, goals, and purpose — typically in a few easy-to-remember sentences. And it’s critical to the success of your blog.

      “I wish I would have found my mission sooner,” Jepsen says. “But I started it in a time when bloggers weren’t making money, and I didn’t know that was a trajectory I could take, so I didn’t write it accordingly. If you’re looking to make money, you will write differently than someone who does it just for fun. Create a focused mission statement in order to know what your content should be and who your audience is.” 

      Let’s look at a few examples of mission statements.

      • Amazon: “Our vision is to be earth’s most customer-centric company; to build a place where people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.”
      • IKEA: “Our vision is to create a better everyday life for the many people. Our business idea supports this vision by offering a wide range of well-designed, functional home furnishing products at prices so low that as many people as possible will be able to afford them.”
      • Nike: “To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete* in the world.”

      Can you see how these concise statements guide how each business operates, shepherding big decisions to even the tiniest ones? It works the same way with your blog.

      Take creating content, for example. 

      “Before we write a single post, we ask ourselves, ‘Does this help our readers make or save money?’” says Kathleen Garvin, editor and marketing strategist for finance blog The Penny Hoarder. “That’s key for us. We’re content creators, but we only want to publish a story if we think it’s truly helpful or interesting for our readers.”

      The Penny Hoarder website.

      A well-crafted mission statement will, ideally, inspire and steer — but not confine — your choices and provide a roadmap for content, structure, and voice. A few minutes of work for a valuable return.

      Great! Now. Where to start? Begin by pondering the following questions:

      • Why did you start blogging?
      • Who is your target audience or blogging niche?
      • What questions do you want to answer?
      • What are you passionate about?
      • In what way is your voice unique?

      Next, try to organize these answers into a few short statements that summarize your goals. Try the Twitter approach — spelling out your purpose and goals in 280 characters or less. You could even try this fill-in-the-blank formula:

      My mission is to _______ for _______ through _______.

      Things to keep in mind: keep it short and sweet, grammar-and-spell-checked, specific but jargon-free, realistic, and focused. Then put it where you can see it — preferably in BIG, bold letters. Refer to it often and adjust as needed.

      4. Just Get Started

      Achieving top-tier blogging status can seem like a long shot. But every successful blogger started somewhere.

      “Produce, produce, produce,” Henderson says. “Leave your perfectionism at the door and just put your work out there. Get feedback, adjust, move on. Without creating and putting your product or service out there, no one will find you and hire you. Just start.”

      Emily Henderson’s blog.

      Begin with exercises to simply get you writing every day. This will help you form the habit that will make blogging easier.

      For content ideas, try a brainstorming worksheet to collect your thoughts (you can do this on a device, too). 

      “Write as often as you possibly can,” says Erin Loechner, design and lifestyle blogger at Design for Mankind. “This does not mean publish as often as you possibly can. Get in the habit, work on your craft. Discover your voice. It takes great practice and great patience. Do it anyway. Sit down in your chair and type it out. Edit later. Publish later. For now, just write.”

      Design for Mankind home page.

      5. You Get What You Go After

      If you’ve been around the block, you know that blogging involves two very crucial Cs: content and consistency. These skills may be the most vital keys to success. We already discussed the importance of creating. Now, let’s talk consistency. 

      It’s proven that marketers who prioritize blogging efforts are 13x more likely to see positive ROI. That’s a big deal. Consistency is an essential part of those efforts.

      “A common mistake early bloggers make is not posting on a consistent schedule,” Garvin says. “Yes, it can be tough, especially in the beginning when you might not have much of a readership, but it’s important for SEO and to build a community. Producing quality content and consistently has been essential to our growth. Like they say, if content is king, consistency is queen!”

      Brittany Watson Jepsen found consistency key to achieving success when she created her blog.

      “I think one of the best things you can do as a blogger is to keep your content constant and consistent,” Jepsen says. “Even when I started out nine years ago, I worked on my blog every single day. That consistency kept people coming back because they didn’t have to wonder if there was content. There was! The next best thing to focus on the main message I was trying to convey. It took me a while to figure out the main thing I wanted to focus on, but once I did,  that’s when the traffic started to roll in. Once I focused on crafts and DIY making, I became known for that, and people started to see me as a trusted voice.”

      If you want to be the authority, the go-to on a particular topic, your readership needs to trust that your blog will have content they need. Your quality content, consistently posted, will draw a following. The two Cs really are inseparably connected. 

      “There are a lot of more detailed keys to blogging success like photography, SEO, social media tips and tricks, etc., but the number one thing I always tell bloggers is that content is king,” Nystul says. “That can mean different things depending on the topic of your blog, but readers will always respond to quality content. My team uses CoSchedule for our editorial calendar, and we love it. It helps keep us super organized and on the same page even when we all work remotely. A couple of other things we love are Slack for messaging and Wunderlist for making to-do lists.” 

      There a host of useful tools available online for planning posts and establishing a schedule. 

      “An important key is to have a plan for what you are wanting to post rather than sitting down and writing every time,” says Syed Balkhi, founder of tech-help site WPBeginner. “Tools like Asana or the WordPress plugin Edit Flow are great for planning out blog posts in advance.”

      The WPBeginner home page.

      To nail down a consistent blogging schedule, try an online calendar or one of a variety of template worksheets available. 

      6. Be Your Own Reader

      When you want to have a successful blog, you really should put yourself in a new pair of shoes — the shoes of your reader, that is. While you are blogging to share a passion, you’ve got to stay focused on your blog visitors and how your content can appeal to their needs and questions.

      The team at The Penny Hoarder made their content more functional to readers by breaking down complex and jargon-heavy financial information into useful, readable packages.

      “When people think of personal finance, they usually expect the content to be dry or boring,” Garvin says. “So we do our best to make it accessible and fun. We write in a friendly, conversational manner, and try to showcase that tone across all media. With that said, we take our readers’ trust seriously.”

      The team at Emily Henderson takes a similar approach when considering their blog’s usability for readers.

      “With every post, we want to be our own reader and ask ourselves, ‘Would I find this interesting, helpful, informative, and beautiful?’” Henderson says. “If not, then we come up with different content that we feel will better suit the audience.”

      Sure, while you’re slaving away at your keyboard, it’s easy to forget that someone is on the other side. But keeping your reader in mind will help you to create attractive, useful content that draws a crowd.

      7. Think (Twice) Before You Hit Publish

      As tempting as it may be, resist the urge to hastily click “Submit” the instant you finish a blog post. 

      “Once the blog posts are planned out,” Balkhi of WP Beginner says, “a common mistake is not going back through to take a look at some of the finer points of the blog post to ensure it reads well for your visitors as well as search engines.”

      Prep your post for publishing by working through a checklist (or a WP plugin) to help you optimize the content — a tool like Naytev works well — and make it appealing to search engines (48% of consumers start mobile research with a search engine) and readers.

      Take time to make sure you’re citing sources correctly and that you haven’t overlooked glaring grammar mistakes (don’t make the off-putting their/they’re/there error). This extra time is a worthwhile investment.

      8. Talk About Yourself

      It may seem like a silly thing, but talking about yourself on your blog is important. And by this, I mean, don’t neglect your blog’s “About Me” page. 

      This page is crucial for helping readers to get to know you, your purpose, and what they can expect to find on your site.

      “This is one of the most highly trafficked pages on any blog because it tells people who you are, gives your background, and explains why someone should follow you,” writes Matthew Karsten, travel blogger at The Expert Vagabond. “Keep it fun and personable. Let your readers know who you are!” 

      Instead of listing random facts about yourself, have a purposeful statement that answers the following questions.

      Who Is Your Audience?

      Let’s look at Karsten’s blog, Expert Vagabond. On his “About Me” page, he writes:

      “It’s a place for people like you who are looking for daily inspiration and motivation to live a life full of adventure.”

      The Expert Vagabond ‘About Me’ page.

      For whom? Check. Karsten clearly identifies the intended audience of his blog.

      What Value Are You Offering to Readers?

      Look at The Penny Hoarder’s manifesto:

      “[The Penny Hoarder’s] purpose is to help people take control of their personal finances and make smart money decisions by sharing actionable articles and resources on how to earn, save, and manage money.” 

      Bam. Garvin and her team have readily identified what they’re offering to those who visit the site.

      What Credibility Does Your Blog Have?

      You could share sites your blog has been featured on, like done on WPBeginner’s About Me page or reader testimonials. Share why your content can be trusted.

      Why Are You Passionate About What You Do?

      While it’s better not to be haphazard about the info you share, you should let readers connect with you by offering a snapshot of yourself and specifically, how your blog grew out of your passion. After all, your readers’ connection to you is what will likely draw them back for more.

      Take Jepsen’s”About Me” page, for example. A little of her bio:

      “Brittany Watson Jepsen here. I grew up teething on the seaweed of Southern California though I preferred reading and creating in the great indoors. My mom’s favorite quote was ‘a creative mess is better than tidy idleness,’ and so my childhood was spent creating artwork, music, and yes, lots of messes.”

      See? Well-written, purposeful statements connect Jepsen to her readers and them to the purpose of the blog.

      What Is Your Call to Action?

      Don’t let your readers browse your “About Me” page and click away with an “Oh, that’s nice.” Encourage them to visit other pages of your blog by providing links to more content, whether that be additional blog posts or social media handles. After all, more clicks equal more traffic.

      And if it wasn’t already obvious, make sure your “About Me” page is accessible and easy to navigate.

      9. Give Your Blog a Facelift

      Ever happened upon a website that seems like it never left the dial-up, over-animated era of the early internet? Well, we have.

      Shudder.

      Even if your site isn’t outfitted with rainbow colors and crowded layouts, its design could be unintentionally frustrating readers. A smart design sets your reader up for a pleasant experience that will entice them to visit again. Never neglect a user-friendly design.

      “A good site design is like settling in to write at a clean, beautiful-to-you desk,” Loechner says. “It is surprisingly important for you and for those who might be visiting such a desk. Pay attention to it; design needn’t be complicated.”

      Be flexible and willing to alter your blog design based on what works best for your readers.

      Keep learning and always be willing to adapt,” Garvin says. “For instance, we recently got rid of display ads on our site because it negatively affected our user experience. It can be scary to remove a revenue source and pivot, but it’s necessary for continued growth. Don’t be afraid of change, but do find out what works best for you and your readers.”

      Have a friend or outsider look at your blog and consider a few questions:

      • Is it dated, confusing, or “broken” or attractive, functional, and engaging?
      • Is there clutter?
      • Does the site load quickly?
      • Would a first-time visitor immediately know what it is about and how to navigate it?

      Utilize themes on WordPress for tried-and-true designs, consult experts, or outsource to a designer (we can help with that!) to ensure your design is aesthetically pleasing. Trust us — no one wants spinning graphics or animated mouse icons. No one.

      Professional Website Design Made Easy

      Make your site stand out with a professional design from our partners at RipeConcepts. Packages start at $299.

      10. Think Mobile

      It’s a pretty startling statistic: 80% of internet users own a smartphone. 

      Chances are good that readers are accessing your blog on a mobile device, likely while they’re commuting to work, sitting in a waiting room, or logging miles on the treadmill. So along with establishing a beautiful design, you’ve also got to optimize for mobile users.

      “Blogs are widely read on the go, so consider a simple and minimal design that looks just as great on your phone as it does in the cubicle,” Loechner says.

      Often, this means choosing a responsive template, but you can also utilize plugins to optimize a WordPress theme. You should consider the following as well:

      • If using a pop-up opt-in form or ad, are mobile users able to navigate around it? 
      • Are outbound links mobile friendly? 
      • Do your social media buttons work properly?
      • If using video, does the player work? Some mobile devices don’t allow Flash.
      • Is your comment platform still mobile friendly?
      • Are slideshows functional?
      • Can users read infographics?

      And really, the only sure way you have to analyze your site for effectiveness across devices is to test it. Use this handy Google tool.

      11. You’ve Got Mail

      You’re probably used to sending most of your inbox to the trash bin, so you might not think that email plays a significant role in blogging success. Think again.

      “One mistake we’ve talked about is neglecting our email list,” says Garvin. “In the beginning of The Penny Hoarder, Kyle used to write a regular, personal email to readers; it was one of his best traffic sources, and he had an open rate of over 50%! However, as the site started taking off and he was pulled in different directions as CEO, we dropped the personalization in favor of a simpler format. We turned things around this year: We’ve started offering a ‘weekender’ roundup email, a daily newsletter, and several other targeted ones. So start an email list early, and keep working to improve it for your readers.”

      Think about this: A survey reported that most of us spend more than five hours checking our email each day. FIVE! Why not capitalize on the habit? It’s easy to monitor your success with email marketing, and it can help you establish a lasting relationship with readers.

      Be Awesome on the Internet

      Join our monthly newsletter for tips and tricks to build your dream website!

      12. Accept the Daily Grind

      You’ve heard that the biggest part of success comes from showing up, right? Ask anyone at the top of their field — Michael Jordan, Martha Stewart, or Yo-Yo Ma — and we’re pretty sure they’d be the first to say that their success amounts to hours, days, and years of putting in hard work.

      Well, that’s true in blogging too. 

      “Determination is an essential quality to have as a blogger,” Balkhi says. “There are no overnight successes with blogs, but when you write about what you are passionate about, they can be great successes.” 

      Remember Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hours principle? Just like playing the piano, painting, or running sprints, honing your blogging skills requires lots of work. 

      “Our keys to blogging success are practice, practice, practice,” say Ryan and Sam Looney of travel blog Our Travel Passport. “Seriously, it’s just about putting in the time to learn your skill and becoming an expert at what you do. We think it’s important to remember that the industry is always changing and content is king. Be original and adaptable and authentic. Don’t use bots. Focus on what makes you unique and tell your story in a way that people can relate to what you have to say.”

      Try a goal chart to keep you motivated when the going gets rough (blogger’s block is real). And of course, keep your mission statement close by. Sometimes all it takes is to remember why you started in the first place.

      “I think the main quality that is essential for bloggers is passion,” Nystul says. “Blogging is not an easy business, and when the going gets tough, passion is the thing that keeps you motivated and working hard.”

      13. Have a Strategy

      Say you’ve got great content and a snazzy site. How do you get people to see it? If you have social media platforms, then you have multiple channels to market your content.

       “Our social media, video, and PR teams work to amplify our content, engage our readers, and raise our profile,” Garvin says. “All of these things contribute significantly when growing our community.”

      The Penny Hoarder team is right. According to consumers, the three characteristics of an effective social media strategy are: 

      1. The brand shares new content.
      2. The brand’s content is relevant.
      3. The brand engages with followers.

      That said, social media is the most effective digital marketing tactic for customer retention after email; it’s essential to choose the right social platforms to get your content in front of readers.

      The Expert Vagabond Instagram page.

      If you intend to manage your social media marketing on your own, then utilize tools like HootSuite or NUVI to manage and monitor on one dashboard. And there’s no shame in admitting that assembling a social team or hiring an agency to help distribute the content online could be best for your blog. You can only bootstrap so much, right?

      14. Engage With Others

      In the blogging game, it’s not you against the world. In other words, it’s not you against every other food/travel/tech blog in your field. Running a successful blog can be a collaborative, community effort that’s personally validating (as opposed to competitive). Go, team!

      Good engagement starts with your content. (Need a refresher? See tips No. 4 and 5.)

      The Looneys recommend staying engaged by posting regularly. “Whether that means posting blog posts once a week or on Instagram every day, it’s important to keep your community involved in what’s going on and what you have to share.”

      15. Go Easy with Analytics

      Numbers say a lot. For instance, a game score tells us who’s on the winning side — and who’s not. The nutritional information in a meal tells us whether or not we can justify dessert. 

      Numbers are important. But they aren’t everything. 

      We know it’s tempting, but clicking the refresh button every 10 seconds on your website’s analytics page fuels an unhealthy obsession that won’t help your success as a blogger (or your blood pressure). Instead, focus on your content, prepare for fluctuations in the stats, and breathe.

      “Forget stats,” Loechner says. “People are not numbers. Readers are not stats. They are humans in all of their lovely complexities. Do not fret yourself over bounce rates and conversion metrics. There are plenty of other things to fret over, after all.”

      Keep an eye on a few metrics for goal purposes, but don’t obsess — numbers change.

      16. Understand Revenue Sources

      The ideal for most people is that their blog becomes a valid source of income. Now, this won’t happen right away, so don’t panic (see No. 11). But you should understand the different ways that you can make money online, so you can decide how — and if — you want to incorporate those methods into your blog.

      Consider using affiliate programs to earn a kickback for the products you promote on your site or running display ads with Google’s AdSense. These revenue streams increase as traffic increases. So if you want to make money by blogging, your first priority should be getting eyes on your content. 

      “The more traffic your blog receives, the more money you can make with it,” Karsten says. “But it takes time to build an audience and grow traffic. Don’t focus on making money right away. Focus on building your audience.”

      17. Combat Internet Trolls

      It seems like anyone who dares to send their work out into the web is, sadly, bound to face the ceaseless negativity of cyberbullies.

      You don’t have to grin and bear it, though. Be intentional about combating the mean-spiritedness you might encounter (no boxing gloves required).

      “For better or worse, I can be really emotionally affected by how people perceive or respond to my blog,” says Lindsay Ostrom, creator of viral food blog Pinch of Yum. “I wish I had that toughness factor, but what I have is more like Sensitivity with a capital S. So I set rules for myself when it comes to reading and processing my social media content and blog comments. Bottom line: be selective about what voices you let speak into your life.”

      Whether you decide to refrain from reading blog comments before noon or you post a motivational message above your computer as a reminder of your potential, know that it’s your blog. Take control and set your own rules.

      18. Don’t Be a Copycat

      Imitation may be the highest form of flattery, but in the blogosphere, it’s just plain ol’ copying. And it’s not going to do anything for your online rep — readers can see right through it. With the inundation of blogs and content creators out there, it can be H-A-R-D to produce content that’s new, fresh, and original. But for a quality blog, a loyal following, and a distinguished brand, it’s more than essential to think outside the box.

      “It’s important to remember that you need to create your own original content,” the Looneys say. “A lot of people go to the same places and pose in the exact same way as big travel bloggers. That’s not creative or original. That’s copying someone else’s work, which doesn’t tell anything about you or your story.”

      Build a blog that allows people to get to know you — and what you’re passionate about, not just posting a CTRL + C reproduction of similar work produced in your field or industry. Be aware of the exhausted been-there-done-that content. Followers will reward the extra effort you take to put your own touch on what you produce.

      19. Find A Cheerleader

      With all the hard work, long days, and (probably) blood, sweat, and tears that go into creating a successful blog, you really need someone in your corner — an encouraging mentor who will wave that foam finger when the going gets rough.

      “Having a single person — literally just one, although more friends equal more party — to talk with when things are spinning into that downward spiral is so important to your ability to bounce back,” Ostrom says. “I guess that’s just true in life, right? And it’s especially true for me in blogging. Find someone who really understands and can relate in some tiny way or another why it’s frustrating when people scrape your content, or what it feels like to deal with that rude comment, or how challenging Facebook’s news feed changes have been lately. It is one thing to talk about this stuff, but it’s another thing to talk about it with someone who really understands blogging.”

      Who is this person for you? A spouse, a friend, a coworker? Finding that supportive someone will help you to overcome the difficult days and celebrate your blogging successes. 

      20. Lower Your Expectations

      Yeah, we know how that sounds. But let us explain.  When getting started, “It’s important to not go into it with high expectations of becoming the next big blogger,” says mega fashion blogger Julia Engel of Gal Meets Glam. “That pressure alone could ruin the whole experience for you. Starting a blog should be fun, and you should do it because you’re passionate about a topic(s)!”

      Blog because you love it. Of course, we know you have the potential to make it to the big leagues of blogging, but that name-in-lights mentality shouldn’t be the end-all, be-all of your efforts. Early on, establish your “why” and remain rooted in it. Not only will it help sustain your motivation through the hard moments, but it will keep your passion ignited. Once you’re sure of your “why,” GET GOING. “Ask yourself, why am I creating this?” Engels says. “If you can answer that question, then just start! I live by this quote: ‘Doubt kills more dreams than failure ever will.’” 

      Be a Content Marketing Master

      We know you’re champing at the bit to get your own blog up and running. We get it. To help you get started, we’ve put together a series of guides on different blogging niches: 

      Now that you’re equipped with the best tools, resources, and you-can-do-it! encouragement from the web’s best bloggers, you need a hosting partner. Let our Managed WordPress Hosting plans start your brand-spankin’-new blog off on the right foot with the high-tech tools, stellar support, and abundant resources offered by DreamHost. 2020 is your year!



      Source link