One place for hosting & domains

      Virtual

      Dedicated Private Cloud vs. Virtual Private Cloud: What’s the Difference?


      What is the difference between a dedicated private cloud and a virtual private cloud? As solutions architects, this is a question my teammates and I hear often. Simply put:

      • Dedicated Private Cloud (DPC) is defined as physically isolated, single-tenant collection of compute, network and sometimes storage resources exclusively provisioned to just one organization or application.
      • Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) is defined as a multi-tenant but virtually isolated, collection of compute, network and storage resources.

      A simple analogy comparing the two would be choosing between a single-family private home (DPC) versus a condo building (VPC).

      Despite the differences, both dedicated and virtual private clouds offer secure environments with flexible management options, which allow you to concentrate on your core business instead of struggling to keep up with daily infrastructure monitoring and maintenance.

      Let’s discuss each cloud product in greater depth and review use cases for dedicated vs. virtual private clouds. I’ll use INAP’s dedicated private cloud (DPC) and virtual private cloud (VPC) products as examples for the DPC and VPC differentiators.

      Dedicated Private Cloud (DPC)

      DPCs are scalable, isolated computing environments that are tailored to fit unique requirements and rightsized for any of workload or application. DPCs are ideal for mission-critical or legacy applications. When applications can’t be easily refactored for the cloud, a DPC can be a viable solution.  DPC is also ideal for organizations seeking to reduce time spent maintaining infrastructure. You do not need to sacrifice control, compliance or performance with a DPC. INAP DPCs are built with trusted enterprise-class technologies powered by VMware or Hyper-V.

      DPC use cases:

      • Compliance and audit requirements, such as PCI or HIPAA
      • Stringent security requirements
      • Large scale applications with rigorous performance and/or data storage requirements
      • Legacy applications, which may require hardware keys or specific software licensing components
      • Data center migration — scale physical compute, network and storage capacity as needed without significant investments in data center build outs
      • Complex network requirements, which may include MPLS, SDWAN, private layer 2 connections to customers, vendors or partners
      • Fully-integrated active or hot-standby disaster recovery environments
      • Infrastructure Management Services, all the way to the operating system
      • High CPU/GPU/RAM requirements
      • AI environments
      • Big Data
      • Always on applications that are not a fit for hyper-scale providers

      INAP’s DPC differentiators:

      • Designed and “right-sized” to fit your application, economics and compliance requirements
      • Built with enterprise-class technologies and powered by VMware or Hyper-V.
      • Utilize 100 percent isolated compute and highly secure, single-tenant environments perfect for PCI or HIPAA compliance.
      • Flexible compute and data storage options which allow you meet any application performance and growth requirements.
      • OS Managed services free up time from routine tasks of patching
      • Transparency into the core infrastructure technology allows you complete visibility in the inter-workings of the environment.
      • No restrictions on sizing of the VMs or application workloads because the infrastructure is custom designed for your organization specific technology needs.
      • SDN switching for flexible, quick and easy network management or dedicated switching for complex network configurations to meet any network requirements.
      • MDR security services available, which include vulnerability scanning, IDS/IPS, log management with SOC (Security Operations Center)
      • Off-site cloud backups and fully integrated and managed DRaaS available.

      Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)

      VPCs are ideal for applications with variable resource requirements and organizations seeking to reduce time spent maintaining infrastructure without sacrificing control of your virtual machines, compliance, and elasticity. They provide a customized landscape of users, groups, computing resources and a virtual network that you define. Different organizations or users of VPC resources do not have access to the underlying hypervisor for customization or monitoring plugin installation.

      VPCs are pre-designed for smaller to medium workloads and provide management and monitoring tools. They allow for very fast application deployment because the highly available compute, security, storage and hypervisors are already deployed and ready for your workload.

      VPC use cases:

      • Small to medium sized workloads with 10 to 25 VMs and simple network requirements
      • Applications with lower RAM requirements
      • Ideal for additional capacity needed for projects. Deploy in hours—not days.
      • Quickly spin up unlimited Virtual Machines (VMs) per host to support new projects or peak business cycle’s ability to quickly add resources on demand

      INAP’s VPC differentiators:

      • Designed for fast deployments enabling you to eliminate lengthy sourcing and procurement timelines
      • Shield Managed Security services included
        • 24/7 physical security in SSAE 16/SOC 2 certified Data Centers
        • Private networks & segmentation
        • Account security for secure portal access
        • DDoS protection & Mitigation
      • OS Managed services free up time from routine tasks of patching
      • Easy to use interface simplifies management and reduces operational expense of training IT staff
      • Off-site Cloud Backups and Fully integrated On-Demand (Paygo) DRaaS available
      • MDR security services available, which include vulnerability scanning, IDS/IPS, log management with SOC (Security Operations Center)

      Next Steps

      Do you know which private cloud model will work with your company’s workload and applications? Whether you’re certain that a DPC or VPC will be a good fit or you’re still unsure, INAP’s experts can help take your cloud infrastructure to the next level. Chat today to talk all things private cloud.

      Explore INAP Private Cloud.

      LEARN MORE

      Rob Lerner


      READ MORE



      Source link

      So richten Sie Apache Virtual Hosts unter Ubuntu 18.04 ein [Schnellstart]


      Einführung

      Dieses Tutorial führt Sie durch das Einrichten mehrerer Domänen und Websites mit virtuellen Apache-Hosts auf einem Ubuntu 18.04-Server. Bei diesem Prozess lernen Sie, wie Sie je nach Art der angeforderten Domäne verschiedenen Benutzern unterschiedlichen Inhalt bereitstellen können.

      Eine ausführlichere Version dieses Tutorials mit besseren Erklärungen zu den einzelnen Schritten finden Sie unter So installieren Sie Apache Virtual Hosts unter Ubuntu 18.04.

      Voraussetzungen

      Um diesem Tutorial zu folgen, benötigen Sie Zugriff auf Folgendes auf einem Ubuntu-18.04-Server:

      • Einen Sudo-Benutzer auf Ihrem Server
      • Einen Apache2-Webserver, den Sie mit sudo apt install apache2 installieren können

      Schritt 1 – Verzeichnisstruktur erstellen

      Zunächst erstellen wir eine Verzeichnisstruktur, in der die Site-Daten gespeichert werden, die wir den Besuchern in unserem Top-Level-Apache-Verzeichnis bereitstellen können. Wir verwenden Beispiele von Domänennamen, die nachstehend hervorgehoben sind. Sie müssen diese durch Ihre tatsächlichen Domänennamen ersetzen.

      • sudo mkdir -p /var/www/example.com/public_html
      • sudo mkdir -p /var/www/test.com/public_html

      Schritt 2 – Berechtigungen erteilen

      Jetzt müssen wir die Berechtigungen auf unseren aktuellen Benutzer ohne Rootberechtigung ändern, um diese Dateien ändern zu können.

      • sudo chown -R $USER:$USER /var/www/example.com/public_html
      • sudo chown -R $USER:$USER /var/www/test.com/public_html

      Außerdem stellen wir sicher, dass der schreibgeschützte Zugriff auf das allgemeine Webverzeichnis und alle darin enthaltenen Dateien und Ordner gestattet ist, damit Seiten richtig bereitgestellt werden können.

      • sudo chmod -R 755 /var/www

      Schritt 3 – Demo-Seiten für jeden virtuellen Host erstellen

      Erstellen wir jetzt Inhalt, den wir bereitstellen können. Dazu erstellen wir eine index.html-Demo-Seite für jede Site. Wir können eine index.html-Datei in einem Textbearbeitungsprogramm für unsere erste Site öffnen, beispielsweise nano.

      • nano /var/www/example.com/public_html/index.html

      In dieser Datei erstellen wir dann ein domänenspezifisches HTML-Dokument wie das folgende:

      /var/www/example.com/public_html/index.html

      <html>
        <head>
          <title>Welcome to Example.com!</title>
        </head>
        <body>
          <h1>Success! The example.com virtual host is working!</h1>
        </body>
      </html>
      

      Speichern und schließen Sie die Datei und kopieren Sie dann diese Datei als Grundlage für unsere zweite Site:

      • cp /var/www/example.com/public_html/index.html /var/www/test.com/public_html/index.html

      Öffnen Sie die Datei und ändern Sie die relevanten Informationen:

      • nano /var/www/test.com/public_html/index.html

      /var/www/test.com/public_html/index.html

      <html>
        <head>
          <title>Welcome to Test.com!</title>
        </head>
        <body> <h1>Success! The test.com virtual host is working!</h1>
        </body>
      </html>
      

      Speichern und schließen Sie auch diese Datei.

      Schritt 4 – Neue virtuelle Host-Dateien erstellen

      Apache wird mit einer virtuellen Standard-Host-Datei namens 000-default.conf geliefert, die wir als Vorlage verwenden. Wir kopieren sie, um eine virtuelle Host-Datei für jede unserer Domänen zu erstellen.

      Erste virtuelle Host-Datei erstellen

      Kopieren Sie als Erstes die Datei für die erste Domäne:

      • sudo cp /etc/apache2/sites-available/000-default.conf /etc/apache2/sites-available/example.com.conf

      Öffnen Sie die neue Datei in Ihrem Textbearbeitungsprogramm (wir verwenden nano) mit Rootberechtigungen:

      • sudo nano /etc/apache2/sites-available/example.com.conf

      Wir werden diese Datei für unsere eigene Domäne anpassen. Ändern Sie den nachstehend hervorgehobenen Text je nach Bedarf.

      /etc/apache2/sites-available/example.com.conf

      <VirtualHost *:80>
          ServerAdmin admin@example.com
          ServerName example.com
          ServerAlias www.example.com
          DocumentRoot /var/www/example.com/public_html
          ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log
          CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined
      </VirtualHost>
      

      Speichern und schließen Sie dann die Datei.

      Ersten virtuellen Host kopieren und für die zweite Domäne anpassen

      Jetzt haben wir unsere erste virtuelle Host-Datei eingerichtet und können dann unsere zweite Datei erstellen, indem wir diese Datei kopieren und je nach Bedarf anpassen.

      Kopieren Sie zu diesem Zweck die Datei:

      • sudo cp /etc/apache2/sites-available/example.com.conf /etc/apache2/sites-available/test.com.conf

      Öffnen Sie die neue Datei mit Rootberechtigungen in Ihrem Textbearbeitungsprogramm:

      • sudo nano /etc/apache2/sites-available/test.com.conf

      Jetzt müssen Sie alle Informationen so ändern, dass sie auf Ihre zweite Domäne verweisen. Die endgültige Datei sollte in etwa wie folgt aussehen, wobei der hervorgehobene Text Ihren eigenen Domäneninformationen entsprechen sollte.

      /etc/apache2/sites-available/test.com.conf

      <VirtualHost *:80>
          ServerAdmin admin@test.com
          ServerName test.com
          ServerAlias www.test.com
          DocumentRoot /var/www/test.com/public_html
          ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log
          CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined
      </VirtualHost>
      

      Wenn Sie fertig sind, speichern und schließen Sie die Datei.

      Schritt 5 – Neue virtuelle Host-Dateien aktivieren

      Nach Erstellung unserer virtuellen Host-Dateien müssen diese aktiviert werden. Dazu verwenden wir das a2ensite-Tool.

      • sudo a2ensite example.com.conf
      • sudo a2ensite test.com.conf

      Deaktivieren Sie als Nächstes die unter 000-default.conf definierte Standard-Site:

      • sudo a2dissite 000-default.conf

      Wenn Sie fertig sind, müssen Sie Apache neu starten, damit diese Änderungen wirksam werden, und systemctl status verwenden, um den Erfolg des Neustarts zu verifizieren.

      • sudo systemctl restart apache2

      Ihr Server sollte jetzt für zwei Websites eingerichtet sein.

      Schritt 6 – Lokale Hosts-Datei einrichten (optional)

      Wenn Sie keine tatsächlichen Domänen verwenden, die ihnen gehören, um dieses Verfahren zu testen, und stattdessen Beispielsdomänen benutzen, können Sie Ihre Arbeit testen, indem Sie die hosts-Datei auf Ihrem lokalen Computer kurzzeitig ändern.

      Geben Sie auf einem lokalen Mac- oder Linux-Rechner Folgendes ein:

      Für einen lokalen Windows-Rechner finden Sie Anweisungen zur Änderung Ihrer Hosts-Datei hier.

      Nach Verwenden der in diesem Leitfaden verwendeten Domänen und Ersetzen Ihrer Server IP im Text your_server_IP sollte Ihre Datei wie folgt aussehen:

      /etc/hosts

      127.0.0.1   localhost
      127.0.1.1   guest-desktop
      your_server_IP example.com
      your_server_IP test.com
      

      Speichern und schließen Sie die Datei. Damit werden alle Anfragen z. B. example.com und test.com auf unseren Rechner weitergeleitet und auf unseren Server übertragen.

      Schritt 7 – Ergebnisse testen

      Nach der Konfiguration Ihrer virtuellen Hosts können Sie Ihr Setup testen, indem Sie zu den Domänen gehen, die Sie in Ihrem Web-Browser konfiguriert haben.

      http://example.com
      

      Sie sollten eine Seite sehen, die so aussieht:

      Beispiel für einen virtuellen Apache-Host

      Sie können auch Ihre zweite Seite besuchen und die Datei sehen, die Sie für Ihre zweite Site erstellt haben.

      http://test.com
      

      Test für einen virtuellen Apache-Host

      Wenn beide Sites wie erwartet funktionieren, haben Sie zwei virtuelle Hosts auf ein und demselben Server konfiguriert.

      Wenn Sie die Host-Datei Ihres eigenen Rechners angepasst haben, löschen Sie die von Ihnen hinzugefügte Zeilen.

      Relevante Tutorials

      Hier sehen Sie Links zu detaillierteren Leitfäden, die im Zusammenhang zu diesem Tutorial stehen:



      Source link

      So richten Sie Apache Virtual Hosts unter Ubuntu 18.04 ein


      Einführung

      Der Apache-Webserver ist eine beliebte Methode zur Bereitstellung von Websites im Internet. Ab 2019 wird er schätzungsweise 29 % aller aktiven Websites bereitstellen und bietet Entwicklern Robustheit und Flexibilität. Mit Apache kann ein Administrator einen Server einrichten, um mehrere Domänen oder Websites über eine einzige Schnittstelle oder IP zu hosten, indem er ein übereinstimmendes System verwendet.

      Jede mit Apache konfigurierte Domäne oder individuelle Site – bekannt als „virtueller Host“ – leitet den Besucher zu einem bestimmten Verzeichnis, das die Informationen dieser Website enthält. Dies geschieht, ohne anzugeben, dass derselbe Server auch für andere Sites verantwortlich ist. Dieses Schema ist ohne jegliche Softwarebeschränkung erweiterbar, solange Ihr Server die Last bewältigen kann. Die Basiseinheit, die eine individuelle Website oder Domäne beschreibt, wird als virtueller Host bezeichnet.

      In diesem Leitfaden führen wir Sie durch die Einrichtung von virtuellen Apache-Hosts auf einem Ubuntu 18.04-Server. Bei diesem Prozess lernen Sie, wie Sie je nach Art der angeforderten Domäne verschiedenen Benutzern unterschiedlichen Inhalt bereitstellen können.

      Voraussetzungen

      Bevor Sie mit diesem Tutorial beginnen, sollten Sie einen Benutzer ohne Rootberechtigung erstellen.

      Sie müssen auch Apache installiert haben, um diese Schritte durcharbeiten zu können. Falls Sie dies noch nicht getan haben, können Sie Apache mit der Paketmethode apt auf Ihrem Server installieren lassen.

      • sudo apt update
      • sudo apt install apache2

      Wenn Sie genauere Anweisungen sowie die Einrichtung einer Firewall wünschen, lesen Sie bitte unseren Leitfaden So installieren Sie den Apache-Webserver unter Ubuntu 18.04.

      Für die Zwecke dieses Leitfadens wird unsere Konfiguration einen virtuellen Host für example.com und einen weiteren für test.com erstellen. Auf diese wird im gesamten Leitfaden Bezug genommen, doch sollten Sie Ihre eigenen Domänen oder Werte einsetzen, während Sie dem Leitfaden folgen.

      Wenn Sie DigitalOcean verwenden, können Sie anhand der Produktdokumentation So fügen Sie Domänen hinzu lernen, wie Sie Domänen einrichten. Für andere Anbieter lesen Sie die entsprechende Produktdokumentation. Wenn Sie zu diesem Zeitpunkt keine Domäne zur Verfügung haben, können Sie Testwerte verwenden.

      Wir zeigen Ihnen später, wie Sie Ihre lokale hosts-Datei zum Testen der Konfiguration bearbeiten können, wenn Sie Testwerte verwenden. Auf diese Weise können Sie Ihre Konfiguration von Ihrem Heimcomputer validieren, auch wenn Ihr Inhalt über den Domänennamen nicht für andere Besucher verfügbar ist.

      Schritt Eins – Erstellen der Verzeichnisstruktur

      Im ersten Schritt werden wir eine Verzeichnisstruktur erstellen, die die Daten der Website enthält, die wir den Besuchern zur Verfügung stellen werden.

      Unser Dokumentenstamm (das Verzeichnis auf oberster Ebene, in dem Apache nach den bereitzustellenden Inhalten sucht) wird unter dem Verzeichnis /var/www auf einzelne Verzeichnisse gesetzt. Wir erstellen hier ein Verzeichnis für beide virtuellen Hosts, die wir erstellen wollen.

      In jedem dieser Verzeichnisse erstellen wir einen Ordner public_html, der unsere eigentlichen Dateien enthält. Dies gibt uns eine gewisse Flexibilität bei unserem Hosting.

      Zum Beispiel werden wir für unsere Sites unsere Verzeichnisse wie folgt erstellen. Wenn Sie tatsächliche Domänen oder alternative Werte verwenden, tauschen Sie den hervorgehobenen Text gegen diese aus.

      • sudo mkdir -p /var/www/example.com/public_html
      • sudo mkdir -p /var/www/test.com/public_html

      Die rot markierten Abschnitte stellen die Domänennamen dar, die wir von unserem VPS aus bereitstellen möchten.

      Schritt Zwei – Erteilen von Berechtigungen

      Jetzt haben wir die Verzeichnisstruktur für unsere Dateien, aber sie gehören unserem Root-Benutzer. Wenn wir möchten, dass unser normaler Benutzer in der Lage ist, Dateien in unseren Webverzeichnissen zu ändern, können wir die Eigentümerschaft ändern, indem wir Folgendes tun:

      • sudo chown -R $USER:$USER /var/www/example.com/public_html
      • sudo chown -R $USER:$USER /var/www/test.com/public_html

      Die Variable $USER nimmt den Wert des Benutzers an, als der Sie gerade angemeldet sind, wenn Sie die EINGABETASTE drücken. Dadurch besitzt unser normaler Benutzer nun die Unterverzeichnisse public_html, in denen wir unsere Inhalte speichern werden.

      Wir sollten auch unsere Berechtigungen ändern, um sicherzustellen, dass der Lesezugriff auf das allgemeine Webverzeichnis und alle darin enthaltenen Dateien und Ordner erlaubt ist, damit die Seiten korrekt bereitgestellt werden können:

      • sudo chmod -R 755 /var/www

      Ihr Webserver sollte nun über die erforderlichen Berechtigungen verfügen, um Inhalte bereitzustellen, und Ihr Benutzer sollte in der Lage sein, Inhalte in den erforderlichen Ordnern zu erstellen.

      Schritt Drei – Erstellen von Demo-Seiten für jeden virtuellen Host

      Wir haben nun unsere Verzeichnisstruktur eingerichtet. Lassen Sie uns einige Inhalte erstellen, die wir bereitstellen können.

      Zu Demonstrationszwecken werden wir für jede Website eine Seite index.html erstellen.

      Beginnen wir mit example.com. Wir können eine Datei index.html in einem Texteditor öffnen. In diesem Fall verwenden wir nano:

      • nano /var/www/example.com/public_html/index.html

      Erstellen Sie innerhalb dieser Datei ein HTML-Dokument, das die Website angibt, mit der sie verbunden ist, wie folgt:

      /var/www/example.com/public_html/index.html

      <html>
        <head>
          <title>Welcome to Example.com!</title>
        </head>
        <body>
          <h1>Success! The example.com virtual host is working!</h1>
        </body>
      </html>
      

      Speichern und schließen Sie die Datei (in nano drücken Sie STRG + X, dann Y und dann die EINGABETASTE) wenn Sie fertig sind.

      Wir können diese Datei kopieren und als Grundlage für unsere zweite Website verwenden, indem wir Folgendes eingeben:

      • cp /var/www/example.com/public_html/index.html /var/www/test.com/public_html/index.html

      Dann können wir die Datei öffnen und die relevanten Informationen ändern:

      • nano /var/www/test.com/public_html/index.html

      /var/www/test.com/public_html/index.html

      <html>
        <head>
          <title>Welcome to Test.com!</title>
        </head>
        <body> <h1>Success! The test.com virtual host is working!</h1>
        </body>
      </html>
      

      Speichern und schließen Sie auch diese Datei. Sie verfügen nun über die erforderlichen Seiten zum Testen der Konfiguration des virtuellen Hosts.

      Schritt Vier – Erstellen neuer virtuelle Host-Dateien

      Virtuelle Host-Dateien sind die Dateien, die die tatsächliche Konfiguration unserer virtuellen Hosts spezifizieren und bestimmen, wie der Apache-Webserver auf verschiedene Domänenanfragen reagieren wird.

      In Apache ist eine virtuelle Standarddatei namens 000-default.conf enthalten, die wir als Ausgangspunkt verwenden können. Wir werden sie kopieren, um eine virtuelle Host-Datei für jede unserer Domänen zu erstellen.

      Wir beginnen mit einer Domäne, konfigurieren sie, kopieren sie für unsere zweite Domäne und nehmen dann die wenigen weiteren erforderlichen Anpassungen vor. Die Standardkonfiguration von Ubuntu erfordert, dass jede virtuelle Host-Datei auf .conf endet.

      Die erste virtuelle Host-Datei erstellen

      Dazu kopieren Sie die Datei für die erste Domäne:

      • sudo cp /etc/apache2/sites-available/000-default.conf /etc/apache2/sites-available/example.com.conf

      Öffnen Sie die neue Datei in Ihrem Editor mit Root-Berechtigungen:

      • sudo nano /etc/apache2/sites-available/example.com.conf

      Ohne Kommentare wird die Datei in etwa wie folgt aussehen:

      /etc/apache2/sites-available/example.com.conf

      <VirtualHost *:80>
          ServerAdmin webmaster@localhost
          DocumentRoot /var/www/html
          ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log
          CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined
      </VirtualHost>
      

      Innerhalb dieser Datei werden wir Elemente für unsere erste Domäne anpassen und einige zusätzliche Anweisungen hinzufügen. Dieser virtuelle Host-Abschnitt entspricht allen Anfragen, die auf Port 80, dem standardmäßigen HTTP-Port, gestellt werden.

      Zuerst müssen wir die Anweisung ServerAdmin in eine E-Mail ändern, über die der Website-Administrator E-Mails empfangen kann.

      ServerAdmin admin@example.com
      

      Danach müssen wir zwei Anweisungen hinzufügen. Der erste namens ServerName legt die Grunddomäne fest, die mit dieser Definition des virtuellen Hosts übereinstimmen sollte. Dies wird höchstwahrscheinlich Ihre Domäne sein. Die zweite namens ServerAlias definiert weitere Namen, die übereinstimmen sollten, als wären sie der Basisname. Dies ist nützlich für die von Ihnen definierte Zuordnung von Hosts, wie beispielsweise www:

      ServerName example.com
      ServerAlias www.example.com
      

      Das einzige, was wir für unsere virtuelle Host-Datei ändern müssen, ist der Speicherort des Dokumentenstamms für diese Domäne. Wir haben das benötigte Verzeichnis bereits erstellt, also müssen wir nur die Anweisung DocumentRoot so ändern, dass sie das von uns erstellte Verzeichnis widerspiegelt:

      DocumentRoot /var/www/example.com/public_html
      

      Nach Fertigstellung sollte unsere virtuelle Host-Datei wie folgt aussehen:

      /etc/apache2/sites-available/example.com.conf

      <VirtualHost *:80>
          ServerAdmin admin@example.com
          ServerName example.com
          ServerAlias www.example.com
          DocumentRoot /var/www/example.com/public_html
          ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log
          CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined
      </VirtualHost>
      

      Speichern und schließen Sie dann die Datei.

      Den ersten virtuellen Host kopieren und für die zweite Domäne anpassen

      Jetzt haben wir unsere erste virtuelle Host-Datei eingerichtet und können dann unsere zweite Datei erstellen, indem wir diese Datei kopieren und je nach Bedarf anpassen.

      Kopieren Sie zu diesem Zweck die Datei:

      • sudo cp /etc/apache2/sites-available/example.com.conf /etc/apache2/sites-available/test.com.conf

      Öffnen Sie die neue Datei mit Rootberechtigungen in Ihrem Textbearbeitungsprogramm:

      • sudo nano /etc/apache2/sites-available/test.com.conf

      Jetzt müssen Sie alle Informationen so ändern, dass sie sich auf Ihre zweite Domäne beziehen. Wenn Sie fertig sind, sollte sie wie folgt aussehen:

      /etc/apache2/sites-available/test.com.conf

      <VirtualHost *:80>
          ServerAdmin admin@test.com
          ServerName test.com
          ServerAlias www.test.com
          DocumentRoot /var/www/test.com/public_html
          ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log
          CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined
      </VirtualHost>
      

      Wenn Sie fertig sind, speichern und schließen Sie die Datei.

      Schritt Fünf – Aktivieren der neuen virtuellen Host-Dateien

      Nachdem wir nun unsere virtuellen Host-Dateien erstellt haben, müssen wir sie aktivieren. Apache enthält einige Tools, mit denen wir dies tun können.

      Wir verwenden das Tool a2ensite, um jede unserer Sites zu aktivieren. Wenn Sie mehr über dieses Skript lesen möchten, können Sie die Dokumentation zu a2ensite einsehen.

      • sudo a2ensite example.com.conf
      • sudo a2ensite test.com.conf

      Deaktivieren Sie die unter 000-default.conf definierte Standard-Site:

      • sudo a2dissite 000-default.conf

      Wenn Sie fertig sind, müssen Sie Apache neu starten, damit diese Änderungen wirksam werden, und systemctl status verwenden, um den Erfolg des Neustarts zu verifizieren.

      • sudo systemctl restart apache2
      • sudo systemctl status apache2

      Ihr Server sollte jetzt für zwei Websites eingerichtet sein.

      Schritt Sechs – Einrichten der Datei „Local Hosts“ (optional)

      Wenn Sie zum Testen dieses Verfahrens keine tatsächlichen Domänennamen, die ihnen gehören, verwendet haben, sondern stattdessen einige Beispieldomänen, können Sie zumindest die Funktionalität dieses Prozesses testen, indem Sie die Datei hosts auf Ihrem lokalen Rechner vorübergehend ändern.

      Dadurch werden alle Anfragen für die von Ihnen konfigurierten Domänen abgefangen und an Ihren VPS-Server verwiesen, so wie es das DNS-System tun würde, wenn Sie registrierte Domänen verwenden würden. Dies funktioniert jedoch nur von Ihrem lokalen Rechner aus und nur zu Testzwecken.

      Stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie für diese Schritte auf Ihrem lokalen Rechner arbeiten und nicht auf Ihrem VPS-Server. Sie müssen das administrative Passwort des Rechners kennen oder anderweitig ein Mitglied der administrativen Gruppe sein.

      Wenn Sie auf einem Mac- oder Linux-Rechner arbeiten, bearbeiten Sie Ihre lokale Datei mit administrativen Berechtigungen, indem Sie Folgendes eingeben:

      Wenn Sie auf einem Windows-Rechner arbeiten, finden Sie hier Anweisungen zur Änderung Ihrer Datei hosts.

      Die Angaben, die Sie hinzufügen müssen, sind die öffentliche IP-Adresse Ihres Servers, gefolgt von der Domäne, mit der Sie diesen Server erreichen möchten.

      Nach Verwenden der in diesem Leitfaden verwendeten Domänen und Ersetzen Ihrer Server-IP im Text your_server_IP sollte Ihre Datei wie folgt aussehen:

      /etc/hosts

      127.0.0.1   localhost
      127.0.1.1   guest-desktop
      your_server_IP example.com
      your_server_IP test.com
      

      Speichern und schließen Sie die Datei.

      Damit werden alle Anfragen, z. B. example.com und test.com, an unseren Rechner weitergeleitet und auf unseren Server übertragen. Genau das möchten wir, wenn wir nicht tatsächlich die Besitzer dieser Domänen sind, um unsere virtuellen Hosts zu testen.

      Schritt Sieben – Testen Ihrer Ergebnisse

      Nach der Konfiguration Ihrer virtuellen Hosts können Sie Ihr Setup testen, indem Sie zu den Domänen gehen, die Sie in Ihrem Webbrowser konfiguriert haben.

      http://example.com
      

      Sie sollten eine Seite sehen, die so aussieht:

      Beispiel für einen virtuellen Apache Host

      Sie können auch Ihre zweite Seite besuchen und die Datei sehen, die Sie für Ihre zweite Site erstellt haben.

      http://test.com
      

      Test für einen virtuellen Apache Host

      Wenn beide Sites wie erwartet funktionieren, haben Sie erfolgreich zwei virtuelle Hosts auf ein und demselben Server konfiguriert.

      Wenn Sie die Datei hosts Ihres Heimcomputers angepasst haben, möchten Sie die hinzugefügten Zeilen möglicherweise löschen, nachdem Sie die Funktionalität Ihrer Konfiguration überprüft haben. Dadurch wird verhindert, dass Ihre Datei hosts mit Einträgen gefüllt wird, die nicht mehr erforderlich sind.

      Wenn Sie langfristig auf diese Datei zugreifen müssen, sollten Sie in Erwägung ziehen, für jede benötigte Website einen Domänennamen hinzuzufügen und sie so einzurichten, dass sie auf Ihren Server verweist.

      Zusammenfassung

      Wenn Sie diesem Beispiel gefolgt sind, sollten Sie jetzt einen einzigen Server haben, der zwei separate Domänennamen verwaltet. Sie können diesen Prozess erweitern, indem Sie die oben beschriebenen Schritte befolgen, um zusätzliche virtuelle Hosts zu erstellen.

      Es gibt keine Softwareeinschränkung für die Anzahl der Domänennamen, die Apache verarbeiten kann, also zögern Sie nicht, so viele zu erstellen, wie Ihr Server verarbeiten kann.



      Source link