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      How To Use Git to Manage Your Writing Project


      Introduction

      Version control isn’t just for code. It’s for anything you want to track, including content. Using Git to manage your next writing project gives you the ability to view multiple drafts at the same time, see differences between those drafts, and even roll back to a previous version. And if you’re comfortable doing so, you can then share your work with others on GitHub or other central Git repositories.

      In this tutorial you’ll use Git to manage a small Markdown document. You’ll store an initial version, commit it, make changes, view the difference between those changes, and review the previous version. When you’re done, you’ll have a workflow you can apply to your own writing projects.

      Prerequisites

      Step 1 — Creating a Workspace for Your Writing Project

      To manage your changes, you’ll create a local Git repository. A Git repository lives inside of an existing directory, so start by creating a new directory for your article:

      Switch to the new article directory:

      The git init command creates a new empty Git repository in the current directory. Execute that command now:

      You’ll see the following output which confirms your repository was created:

      Output

      Initialized empty Git repository in /Users/sammy/article/.git/

      The .gitignore file lets you tell Git that some files should be ignored. You can use this to ignore temporary files your text editor might create, or operating systems files. On macOS, for example, the Finder application creates .DS_Store files in directories. Create a .gitignore file that ignores them:

      Add the following lines to the file:

      .gitignore

      # Ignore Finder files
      .DS_store
      

      The first line is a comment, which will help you identify what you’re ignoring in the future. The second line specifies the file to ignore.

      Save the file and exit the editor.

      As you discover more files you want to ignore, open the .gitignore file and add a new line for each file or directory you want to ignore.

      Now that your repository is configured, you can start working.

      Step 2 — Saving Your Initial Draft

      Git only knows about files you tell it about. Just because a file exists in the directory holding the repository doesn’t mean Git will track its changes. You have to add a file to the repository and then commit the changes.

      Create a new Markdown file called article.md:

      Add some text to the file:

      article.md

      # How To Use Git to Manage Your Writing Project
      
      ### Introduction
      
      Version control isn't just for code. It's for anything you want to track, including content. Using Git to manage your next writing project gives you the ability to view multiple drafts at the same time,  see differences between those drafts, and even roll back to a previous version. And if you're comfortable doing so, you can then share your work with others on GitHub or other central git repositories.
      
      In this tutorial you'll use Git to manage a small Markdown document. You'll store an initial version, commit it, make changes, view the difference between those changes, and review the previous version. When you're done, you'll have a workflow you can apply to your own writing projects.
      

      Save the changes and exit the editor.

      The git status command will show you the state of your repository. It will show you what files need to be added so Git can track them. Run this command:

      You’ll see this output:

      Output

      On branch master No commits yet Untracked files: (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed) .gitignore article.md nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

      In the output, the Untracked files section shows the files that Git isn’t looking at. These files need to be added to the repository so Git can watch them for changes. Use the git add command to do this:

      • git add .gitignore
      • git add article.md

      Now run git status to verify those files have been added:

      Output

      On branch master No commits yet Changes to be committed: (use "git rm --cached <file>..." to unstage) new file: .gitignore new file: article.md

      Both files are now listed in the Changes to be committed section. Git knows about them, but it hasn’t created a snapshot of the work yet. Use the git commit command to do that.

      When you create a new commit, you need to provide a commit message. A good commit message states what your changes are. When you’re working with others, the more detailed your commit messages are, the better.

      Use the command git commit to commit your changes:

      • git commit -m "Add gitignore file and initial version of article"

      The output of the command shows that the files were committed:

      Output

      [master (root-commit) 95fed84] Add gitignore file and initial version of article 2 files changed, 9 insertions(+) create mode 100644 .gitignore create mode 100644 article.md

      Use the git status command to see the state of the repository:

      The output shows there are no changes that need to be added or committed.

      Output

      On branch master nothing to commit, working tree clean

      Now let’s look at how to work with changes.

      Step 3 — Saving Revisions

      You’ve added your initial version of the article. Now you’ll add more text so you can see how to manage changes with Git.

      Open the article in your editor:

      Add some more text to the end of the file:

      ## Prerequisites
      
      * Git installed on your local computer. The tutorial [How to Contribute to Open Source: Getting Started with Git](https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-contribute-to-open-source-getting-started-with-git) walks you through installing Git and covers some background information you may find useful. 
      

      Save the file.

      Use the git status command to see where things stand in your repository:

      The output shows there are changes:

      Output

      On branch master Changes not staged for commit: (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed) (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory) modified: article.md no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

      As expected, the article.md file has changes.

      Use git diff to see what they are:

      The output shows the lines you’ve added:

      diff --git a/article.md b/article.md
      index 77b081c..ef6c301 100644
      --- a/article.md
      +++ b/article.md
      @@ -5,3 +5,7 @@
       Version control isn't just for code. It's for anything you want to track, including content. Using Git to manage your next writing project gives you the ability to view multiple drafts at the same time,  see differences between those drafts, and even roll back to a previous version. And if you're comfortable doing so, you can then share your work with others on GitHub or other central git repositories.
      
       In this tutorial you'll use Git to manage a small Markdown document. You'll store an initial version, commit it, make changes, view the difference between those changes, and review the previous version. When you're done, you'll have a workflow you can apply to your own writing projects.
      +
      +## Prerequisites
      +
      +* Git installed on your local computer. The tutorial [How to Contribute to Open Source: Getting Started with Git](https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-contribute-to-open-source-getting-started-with-git) walks you through installing Git and covers some background information you may find useful. 
      

      In the output, lines starting with a plus (+) sign are lines you added. Lines that were removed would show up with a minus (-) sign. Lines that were unchanged would have neither of these characters in front.

      Using git diff and git status is a helpful way to see what you’ve changed. You can also save the diff to a file so you can view it later with the following command:

      • git diff article.md > article_diff.diff

      Using the .diff extension will help your text editor apply the proper syntax highlighting.

      Saving the changes to your repository is a two-step process. First, add the article.md file again, and then commit. Git wants you to explicitly tell it which files go in every commit, so even though you added the file before, you have to add it again. Note that the output from the git status command reminds you of that.

      Add the file and then commit the changes, providing a commit message:

      • git add article.md
      • git commit -m "add prerequisites section"

      The output verifies that the commit worked:

      Output

      [master 1fbfc21] add prerequisites section 1 file changed, 4 insertions(+)

      Use git status to see your repository status. You’ll see that there’s nothing else to do.

      Output

      On branch master nothing to commit, working tree clean

      Continue this process as you revise your article. Make changes, verify them, add the file, and commit the changes with a detailed message. Commit your changes as often or as little as you feel comfortable. You might perform a commit after you finish each draft, or right before you do a major rework of your article’s structure.

      If you send a draft of a document to someone else and they make changes to it, take their copy and replace your file with theirs. Then use git diff to see the changes they made quickly. Git will see the changes whether you typed them in directly or replaced the file with one you downloaded from the web, email, or elsewhere.

      Now let’s look at managing the versions of your article.

      Step 4 — Managing Changes

      Sometimes it’s helpful to look at a previous version of a document. Whenever you’ve used git commit, you’ve supplied a helpful message that summarizes what you’ve done.

      The git log command shows you the commit history of your repository. Every change you’ve committed has an entry in the log.

      Output

      commit 1fbfc2173f3cec0741e0a6b21803fbd0be511bc4 Author: Sammy Shark <sammy@digitalocean> Date: Thu Sep 19 16:35:41 2019 -0500 add prerequisites section commit 95fed849b0205c49eda994fff91ec03642d59c79 Author: Sammy Shark <sammy@digitalocean> Date: Thu Sep 19 16:32:34 2019 -0500 Add gitignore file and initial version of article

      Each commit has a specific identifier. You use this number to reference a specific commit’s changes. You only need the first several characters of the identifier though. The git log --oneline command gives you a condensed version of the log with shorter identifiers:

      Output

      1fbfc21 add prerequisites section 95fed84 Add gitignore file and initial version of article

      To view the initial version of your file, use git show and the commit identifier. The identifiers in your repository will be different than the ones in these examples.

      • git show 95fed84 article.md

      The output shows the commit detail, as well as the changes that happened during that commit:

      Output

      commit 95fed849b0205c49eda994fff91ec03642d59c79 Author: Sammy Shark <sammy@digitalocean> Date: Thu Sep 19 16:32:34 2019 -0500 Add gitignore file and initial version of article diff --git a/article.md b/article.md new file mode 100644 index 0000000..77b081c --- /dev/null +++ b/article.md @@ -0,0 +1,7 @@ +# How To Use Git to Manage Your Writing Project + +### Introduction + +Version control isn't just for code. It's for anything you want to track, including content. Using Git to manage your next writing project gives you the ability to view multiple drafts at the same time, see differences between those drafts, and even roll back to a previous version. And if you're comfortable doing so, you can then share your work with others on GitHub or other central git repositories. + +In this tutorial you'll use Git to manage a small Markdown document. You'll store an initial version, commit it, make changes, view the difference between those changes, and review the previous version. When you're done, you'll have a workflow you can apply to your own writing projects.

      To see the file itself, modify the command slightly. Instead of a space between the commit identifier and the file, replace with :./ like this:

      • git show 95fed84:./article.md

      You’ll see the content of that file, at that revision:

      Output

      # How To Use Git to Manage Your Writing Project ### Introduction Version control isn't just for code. It's for anything you want to track, including content. Using Git to manage your next writing project gives you the ability to view multiple drafts at the same time, see differences between those drafts, and even roll back to a previous version. And if you're comfortable doing so, you can then share your work with others on GitHub or other central git repositories. In this tutorial you'll use Git to manage a small Markdown document. You'll store an initial version, commit it, make changes, view the difference between those changes, and review the previous version. When you're done, you'll have a workflow you can apply to your own writing projects.

      You can save that output to a file if you need it for something else:

      • git show 95fed84:./article.md > old_article.md

      As you make more changes, your log will grow, and you’ll be able to review all of the changes you’ve made to your article over time.

      Conclusion

      In this tutorial you used a local Git repository to track the changes in your writing project. You can use this approach to manage individual articles, all the posts for your blog, or even your next novel. And if you push your repository to GitHub, you can invite others to help you edit your work.



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      How to Create a  Freelance Writer Website That Actually Gets You Writing Gigs


      The future is freelance. Did you know? By 2020, 50% of the U.S. workforce will do some type of freelance work — and it’s predicted that by 2027, freelancers will make up the majority. Whether you work exclusively freelance or take on additional side projects in conjunction with your full-time work, you’re joining an ever-growing population of successful, flexible, untethered, and creative craftspeople.

      What’s more, the innovation and growth of technology have made the work environment more fruitful for freelancers: 64% of freelancers found work online — a 22-point increase in the last five years.

      And you freelance writers, bloggers, and web content writers — we see you. We know you’re out there, coloring the world with your beautiful language and lightbulb ideas.

      But because freelancers must do their own marketing legwork, you need to take advantage of every tool available to you in building a prolific writing business. One of the biggest weapons in your arsenal? A relevant web presence. Forget scouring the wanted ads to find work — establishing an online presence and showing off a strong virtual CV is vital for getting seen and earning $$$.

      How to put your best foot — and word — forward online? A top-of-the-class website. For writers, a killer freelance writer website is a make-it-or-break-it tool for getting you leads on quality writing gigs. And we’re going to show you how to do it. Here’s what we’ll cover in this guide (in case you want to jump ahead):

      With a website, you can flaunt your talent and personality, create sustainable sales, build your writing portfolio, and connect with potential and return customers, building your business and financial success — all in one place.

      Build Your Online Portfolio with DreamHost

      We make sure your freelance writing website is fast, secure and always up so you never miss a gig. Plans start at $2.59/mo.

      Why is Having a Good Freelance Writer Website Important?

      You’re a writer — you know, good ‘ol pen and paper. Why do you even need a website in the first place? With a well-built freelance writer website, you can:

      • Showcase Your Online Portfolio. One of the most significant advantages of creating a freelance writer website is having a living, breathing portfolio that is easily accessible online. Prospective clients can access your work, and through a broad range of content, get a feel for your style, voice, and writing ability. They can view your previous work and a wealth of relevant content that will help them trust their business to you.
      • Increase Brand Visibility. Your website is a visible showcase of your writing ability and a crucial tool for establishing awareness of your brand. With a powerful online presence, visitors don’t have to go digging around to discover info on your offerings. Not only do you make it possible for people to find you online, but your website also helps you build likability. With great content and engaging content, visitors start to care about you and your work and will entertain the prospect of working with you. It illustrates your legitimacy as a writing professional and helps you position yourself as an authority in your field. By making your work accessible, you broaden your visibility and provide social proof which, in turn, increases your chances of getting rewarding freelance writing work.
      • Strengthen Brand Legitimacy. Let’s be real. Companies without a website or an internet presence tend to raise some red flags in the e-commerce ecosystem, right? Everything’s on the web. These days, a dot com is an essential requirement in the biz world. If internet users can’t find your virtual corner of the web, customers seeking out a particular product or service will instantly think: can we trust that business if they’re not online in an everything-digital age?

      It’s a no-brainer that if you want to do business and market a product or service in the world we live in, potential clients need to be able to find you with just a couple of clicks from their browser. So on a very basic level, having a website helps establish your brand as a legitimate business, rather than just operating amateur or letting customers rely on what they gather from your social media presence. What’s more, the better you are at outfitting your site with great content and strong visuals, the more that legitimacy will increase and work in your favor. To bless your bottom line and earn trust from internet visitors, it’s crucial to demonstrate not only your tech-savvy web skills but also your ability to establish a professional and valuable web presence.

      We know you’re wondering: Do I have to have a freelance writer website if I’m just getting started? The short answer: No. BUT — having an established site for your freelance writing (your services and a showcasing portfolio) is the best way to build a marketing funnel and establish a legitimate, cohesive, and authoritative brand. It’s a clear way to put your best foot forward and secure quality writing jobs.

      OK, but hold up. It’s 2019, you say. Can’t I just use social media, like a LinkedIn company page, instead of a website to promote my writing business? Sure. But a website, even a simple one, is a good idea. With a well-established freelance writer website, you build authority as a brand, and increase your chances of getting seen by potential clients. Plus, you’ll own all the content on your site — something that isn’t always true on social media sites.

      Perhaps building a high-performing and snazzy-looking freelance writer website seems like an overwhelming task. But putting in the effort to set up a website is an investment with guaranteed returns.  A site to be admired — and get you hired.

      How to Build a Great Freelance Writer Website (7 Steps)

      Like we said, creating a great-looking freelance writer website doesn’t have to be rocket science or overly time-intensive. We’ll show you how to set up a website in seven easily-manageable steps.

      1. Brand Your Business

      Time to pick a name, business owner! If you’re branding yourself and marketing your skills, you can use your own name, but ask yourself a few of the following big-picture questions before nailing down a moniker:

      Would you ever sell your business? Even if you’re not entirely sure of your long-term business plan, you probably have an idea if you ever intend to pass the torch on your writing business or include others’ services or products in conjunction with your business.

      If you’ve entertained the idea of selling your brand one day or partnering up, don’t brand yourself with your own name. Obviously, that is unique to you and won’t transfer. Also, if your name is difficult to spell, pronounce, or remember, consider the possible confusion using your name might cost your business.

      But then again, your personal name might help brand you uniquely as potential clients can differentiate you from other common-name writing businesses. So consider your options before jumping into a brand or business name haphazardly. You never know how you’ll grow, adapt, and change in your freelance writing business. You’ll want to choose carefully in order to set yourself up for long-term success.

      Freelance writer at laptop.

      2. Choose a Content Management System

      Now that you’ve got your brand’s fancy new name tag, you need a content management system (CMS) to facilitate the creation and publication of your content on the web. The best part? You don’t have to know how to program a single line of code to use one! Take WordPress, one of the web’s most popular content management systems out there (it powers 30% of the internet!)

      With the WordPress platform, you can create and manage your web content without the pressure of a deep learning curve — you can get a website set up with little-to-no technical know-how.

      3. Register a Domain and Set up Hosting 

      OK, you’ve decided you want to use WordPress, and you’re full of great content ideas. Good to go, right? Well, first, you need to find your site a home on the web so that visitors can actually view and engage with your content. All those great ideas won’t amount to anything if your website isn’t available online. That means you need two very critical components: a domain and a hosting provider.

      A domain is the unique web address where your website can be found. This is what visitors will type into their browser to navigate to your site (for example, www.dreamhost.com). Your domain is unique to your website and should match your brand or business name. You should also consider your choice of top-level domain —  meaning .com or .blog or dot-whatever —  in order to position yourself as an authority in search engine rankings. Whatever domain name you choose, you purchase it through a registrar.

      Next, you need a hosting provider. Hosting companies sell unique-to-you plans that include space on a server so that your website has a place to live online. Without a server, your website won’t be available to visit. For the best chance at scoring quality gigs, you need a quality hosting provider.

      There are a lot of providers out there, but only DreamHost can offer you the best of the best: one-of-a-kind features, high-performance tech, and responsive support. Plus, we make things easy: domain registration and hosting services under one roof and one-click WordPress installs. With Shared Hosting, just check the “Pre-Install WordPress” box during sign-up and boom! We install it for you.

      Shared Hosting provides ambitious WordPress beginners everything they need to create a killer freelance writing website that gets them hired. Even better? Our Shared Hosting plans start at just $2.59 per month.

      DreamHost’s Shared Hosting

      4. Choose a WordPress Theme

      Time to outfit your website with a WordPress theme. The theme you select doesn’t just dictate the overall appearance of your site (though it does do that), but it also determines what sort of functionality your site will have. The right theme will allow you to control and customize your website to your exact specifications and niche. Browse the WordPress Theme Directory or search WordPress theme developers to find and install your perfect theme.

      WordPress Theme Directory

      5. Decide What Content Your Site Needs

      So what does your freelance writer website need? What are the must-have content and features relevant to your niche? Time to make a plan. While you have the freedom to customize your website according to your brand and personality, there are a few essential pages that your site should have to set you up for the best possible business success:

      • Homepage: An easy-to-navigate and attractive landing page that can direct visitors and potential clients to important parts of your website.
      • Online Portfolio: Your website should be a solid, structured way to demonstrate your skills as a professional writer. A vital feature — nay, asset —  of your website is an easy-to-find, specially-dedicated portfolio section where you can showcase relevant published work and prove your capabilities as a writer.
      • Services: Nearly 50% of website visitors check out a company’s product or services page before any other sections of the site. That’s big. What do you offer? Give potential clients a clear and detailed description of the specific writing services you offer.
      • About: Don’t be a robot behind the computer screen. Demonstrate your writing chops, let potential clients and visitors get to know you, and help them get acquainted with your unique voice with an engaging and humanizing Get-to-Know-Me section. Showcase your accomplishments and passion for what you do but also share what makes you unique.
      • Contact: How can potential clients get in touch with you? Make your contact information easy to find and use.

      Now that you’ve got your essential pages set up, you can go above and beyond to bring your freelance writer website to the next level. While you should avoid non-essentials, you can consider adding the following optional (but helpful) pages:

      • Clients: Name-dropping your current clients on your website is a great way to demonstrate social proof and establish your authority in the field. Think of it as a virtual word-of-mouth recommendation.
      Speaker, writer, and consultant Hillary Weiss proudly displays the well-known brands that believe in her work.
      • Testimonials: The power of a good review cannot be overstated, especially in an online environment. Confidently showcasing positive feedback you’ve received from clients in your field about your writing services can be great fodder for snagging new clients and more writing jobs. It’s OK to toot your own horn.
      Writer and speaker Colleen M. Story inspires confidence with a visible display of reader testimonials.
      • Blog: In addition to your portfolio, you can showcase your writing chops and your unique voice with a content-rich blog. The extra effort and value you’re providing your visitors with relevant blog content can be an investment with rich returns.
      • Resume: Allow visitors and potential clients to check out a bulleted list of your skills and achievements with an easy-to-view CV.
      • FAQs: If you want to answer potentially common questions about your work or services or provide more specific details to potential clients about what you offer, consider adding a FAQ section.
      • Downloads/Freebies: Making free, downloadable goodies available to your visitors on your site shows that you’re going above and beyond to offer value, demonstrating the high-quality nature of your freelance business.

      Lastly, consider pricing: if you want to be explicit on your site about the cost of your services, be transparent, upfront, and confident in the value of your work. Or if you have adjust-to-fit service options, you can keep costs mum and invite interested visitors to contact you for a quote.

      6. Create the Content

      Time to get creating! You know the adage: content is king. Live by it. You need to fill your website with rich content to attract traffic and prove your worthiness as a business. Fill the content on your must-have pages first, then continue to provide valuable content regularly.

      Of just as much importance as creating content is creating it smartly — meaning, using it to get found by potential clients. How to do that? Using keywords. Consider: what are relevant topics and search terms related to your field? Being smart about how you use phrasing and common search terms in your content will allow you to position yourself for good rankings and stronger search engine optimization. So do your research and incorporate common search terms into your content. Use tools like Google’s comprehensive (and free!) Keyword Planner to create high-traffic website content with smart keyword research and build a strong content marketing strategy.

      Also, consider the tone of your content. Does it appropriately and uniquely represent your brand? Does it showcase your expertise and/or personality? One of the most marketable tools in your writer repertoire is your voice — use it smartly.

      7. Launch

      Celebrate! Toast to yourself, do a little dance, pat yourself on the back. You did it! Your website is up and running! You should be proud. We know that having something living, breathing out there on the web can be nerve-wracking. Don’t worry about your website not being perfect. The important thing is that it’s out there.

      Remember, you can always perfect and tweak over time. Most importantly, people can start finding you — and you have something you can improve on.

      7 Mistakes to Avoid When Setting Up Your Writer Website

      When you’re starting out with your website, it’s inevitable to face a learning curve. Some things just take time to learn. You will improve over time. But guess what? We want you to succeed —  as soon as possible. So we’re giving you some inside knowledge: a list of thou-shalt-nots when setting up your freelance writer website. Avoid these major whoopsies, and you’ll be one step ahead in attracting quality writing jobs.

      1. Bad Visuals

      Let’s talk a little science. Did you know 90% of the information processed by the brain is visual? What’s more, 80% of people remember what they see (compared to 10% of what they hear and 20% of what they read.) Lastly, know that visuals help grow traffic — content creators who feature visual content grow traffic 12 times faster than those who don’t.

      Not having visuals as a part of your freelance writer website is a BIG no-no. But even more, having bad visuals can torpedo your chance at building a successful freelance writing business. Judgments on a company’s credibility are 75% based on the company’s website design, so take seriously the first impression you’re making with your visuals. Your visuals should be reflective of the quality work you offer, proving you trustworthy to potential clients and their money.

      To benefit from the traffic-building and engaging powers of excellent visuals, select quality images, a robust visual structure, and remember: white space is good space.

      2. CTA Issues

      When visitors come to your website, you want them to do something. But if you don’t ask them to do anything, they will click away and you won’t get any business. Not ideal. Even if you have kick-butt writing skills and excellent website design, having confusing, conflicting, or nonexistent CTAs (70% of small biz websites lack a CTA) will damage your chances of growing your business.

      So think: what do you need visitors to do to get writing gigs for your business? Whether it’s subscribing to an email list, filling out a contact form, or viewing your portfolio of work, make sure that your CTA is visible, clear, and focused.

      Elna of Innovative Ink has a clear CTA front and center — visitors know just what to do.

      3. Sloppy Formatting

      You’re not just a freelancer — you are a brand. As such, your potential clients expect a level of professionalism from you, so they need to see that the minute they click onto your site. Along with clear navigation, focused visual structure, and a frictionless contact funnel, your website needs to be fine-tuned, sleek, and polished.

      Even as a freelancer, an entrepreneurial free spirit, you need to channel those suit-and-tie vibes on your website to gain the trust of potential clients. No sloppy formatting, no error-filled copy, or overly-casual design. Concern yourself with the details. If you want people to trust you with their dollars, you need to be professional. Not only does meticulous formatting help your site design make a killer first impression (remember the eye-opening stats about visuals?), but it helps people view you as a trustworthy business.

      4. TMI (Too Much Information)

      Don’t get us wrong; it’s great to be personable and relatable. A critical part of your brand’s success is your likability. You want to be a person to visitors and potential clients, not just a robot writer behind a screen.

      But your website is not your online diary.

      Refrain from sharing too much personal info or content irrelevant to your field. Focus your content and be strategic about what you choose to share, making it all in the aim of building your business and earning clients.

      5. No Target Audience

      You have a brand-spankin’-new freelance writer website and are ready to bring in traffic, and ideally, new business. But who are you trying to reach through your website? What kinds of people are you looking to attract? In simple terms: who is your target audience?

      Your success is hugely determined by how you focus your efforts on building a business. If you cast too wide a net, you won’t be able to effectively target the high-quality clients that you want. So before you start seeking to build traffic, identify your target.

      6. Weak Copy

      You’re a writer. Skilled wordsmithing is your talent, your money-making tool, and your passion. That being said, every aspect of your website should reflect your abilities as a writer. Weak, lackluster copy will not earn you clients, build trust, or engage visitors. In fact, it will send potential clients to your competitors.

      Take special, even meticulous care in making sure that your copy is strong, engaging, and polished. Whether you’re writing blog posts, articles, or landing page copy, don’t just wing it — write and rewrite, seek a second pair of eyes for outside observation, and edit, edit, edit. The strength of your copy will make or break your business.

      7. Infrequent Updates

      Reality check: creating a money-making freelance writer website isn’t a one-and-done affair. Just like software needs regular updates, so does your website. Not only do periodic refreshes help you out SEO-wise, but they keep things relevant and professional. Update blog content, test plugins, solicit feedback, and use site analytics frequently to adjust how it operates for maximum UX. Know that you won’t always get things right the first time — continually be looking to improve all aspects of your website.

      Handy Resources for Starting a Writer Website

      Don’t worry — we’re not going to just throw you out to the web’s wolves without a few more top-tier tools for your burgeoning freelance writer website. Here, we offer you a well-curated roundup, a well-stocked toolbox of handy virtual resources destined to help you reach your goals.

      Web Hosting

      We know we’ve mentioned this before, but a good web hosting provider can make all the difference for the success of your freelance writing business. It’s true. Not only can a reliable hosting provider help make creating content easy, but it can make the management of your website a snap, leaving you to focus on the most crucial aspects of running your writing business.

      With DreamHost Shared Hosting plans, we offer you those benefits and more — including 24/7 support, high-performance tech, and budget-friendly options. Choosing a hosting provider is one of the first choices you’ll make on your journey — make it a smart choice with DreamHost.

      DreamHost’s Shared Hosting

      Logo

      Like we’ve said, your freelance writing business is just that: a business. And most companies out there are easily identified by a unique marker — their logo. Think about any famous company: Nike, Apple, McDonald’s — you can quickly think of their logo just by seeing the name, right? Or you’d be able to pick it out easily if you just saw the logo’s telltale visual?

      Having your own logo is an integral part of establishing and building your brand. It’s essential for consistency, visibility, and growth. But don’t worry; making one that your visitors will love isn’t hard to do.

      Brand Colors

      In addition to your logo, you should establish a color palette that is unique to your brand. This will help your website and materials feel cohesive and professional and can even help you grow your business by highlighting relevant sections or CTAs with specific colors. Picking your brand colors is as easy as 1-2-3, but remember to be intentional about your personal branding choices.

      Stock Images

      We’ve already emphasized how significant visuals are for helping bring in traffic and engage visitors. So where do you get professional-looking images and other visuals? Try Pexels or Unsplash for high-res, royalty-free photos, or find a photographer to take some for you. If you’re ambitious, follow a DIY at-home photography guide to snap your own for cheap. And remember, copyright rules rule, so keep things legal. Give credit where necessary and don’t steal.

      Photo Editing

      You don’t have to be a Photoshop master to give your images that extra oomph. Crop, adjust, and enhance your photos to improve composition and make your website visuals a powerful tool in earning your business. Try a few simple photo editing tricks on the software of choice.

      Icons

      As another type of visual, icons or symbols on your website can make it easy for visitors to find exactly what they’re looking for — whether it be your social media pages, your portfolio, or contact form — without even having to navigate menus or copy. They’re a universal language! Get great-looking icons on sites like The Noun Project, Creative Market, or for free on Flat Icon.

      Design

      Your freelance writer website should have its own unique feel. After all, you are your unique brand. Your design incorporates not only your layout, but the style of your copy, visuals, and navigation. A well-designed website is carefully thought-out for ultimate functionality and aesthetic, and we’ve got the guide to help you make it look snazzy.

      If you don’t have an eye for design, DreamHost can help. We’ve partnered with the experts at RipeConcepts, a leading web design firm, to offer professional web design services to our users.

      Professional Website Design Made Easy

      Make your site stand out with a professional design from our partners at RipeConcepts. Packages start at $299.

      The Final Word

      Now, we’ll reveal the results of our crystal ball reading: we see a bright (and prolific) freelance writing career in your future! Getting quality writing gigs may take some website-building legwork, but with a well-built site, you’re well on your way to new clients and a growing portfolio.

      Because your success is our success, DreamHost offers you the perfect beginning-of-the-journey hosting packages to get you on your feet. Check out our comprehensive Shared Hosting plans to start taking your career to the next level with a freelance writing website.



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